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View Full Version : What's with my new instrument glue?



curlykoa
12-04-2009, 05:33 AM
I just purchased "instrument glue" from LMI and used it to glue up my bridge plate and tone bars. It dried white as milk although they say it dries clear. Called the company and talked to them. They said wait awhile, but 24 hours and it is still white.

I know it is not supposed to freeze and I work in an unheated basement where the temp stays about 45 degrees. Maybe it froze during shipment. What happens to the glue when it freezes? I just don't want to compromise my project with glue that won't perform as it should. Thanks, Wendy:(

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
12-04-2009, 05:51 AM
I don't know about your specific question, but if you are working in a 45 degree environment you're going to have more serious issues down the road.

Kekani
12-04-2009, 06:46 AM
I don't know about your specific question, but if you are working in a 45 degree environment you're going to have more serious issues down the road.

Yup.

As for the glue, I keep my LMI in the refrigerator - supposed to last longer. Shelf life is something like 6-9 months (longer if you're in 45 degree weather I'm guessing). It took over a year for it to start smelling (yes, I date the glue when I open it).

ksquine
12-04-2009, 07:32 AM
Been there....
anything under 60degrees is too cold. The joint will be white and have no strength. Just bend that joint and it will break.
Bring it in the house and glue up there

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
12-04-2009, 07:41 AM
Aaron, What are the qualities you like about the LMI glue as opposed to the Titebond Original that is favored by many builders? I've been thinking of ordering some but I'm not sure why I'd want to since I've had no issues with the Titebond.......

Kekani
12-04-2009, 02:08 PM
Aaron, What are the qualities you like about the LMI glue as opposed to the Titebond Original that is favored by many builders? I've been thinking of ordering some but I'm not sure why I'd want to since I've had no issues with the Titebond.......

I was on that thought process as well. Titebond has served me well, so I thought, "Why should I spend that much on glue that'll spoil sooner than TB?"

I like the open time, which is much less than TB. The only issue there is when I'm gluing on linings and I have to clamp them, really fast. Of course, it makes me work faster. It creeps less than TB, and from what Rick Turner alluded to, dries harder. This you can tell, especially when it dries clear. IF it happens to seep out after I'm done clamping and cleaning, it dries clear, and all it takes is a blade/chisel and it chops right off (gotta do this to know what I'm talking about).

My thought now is, "LMI makes the glue specifically for instruments. Anyone else doing that?" Of course, it reminds me of the glue that Paul uses (could possibly be the same?).

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
12-04-2009, 03:36 PM
Thanks Aaron. Yes, I believe Paul told me he uses LMI glue as well. said it dried much faster. I can see the reason for both glues in my shop.

thejumpingflea
12-04-2009, 06:30 PM
Thanks Aaron. Yes, I believe Paul told me he uses LMI glue as well. said it dried much faster. I can see the reason for both glues in my shop.

Sounds like the start of G.A.S.







Glue Acquisition Syndrome!! :D

koalohapaul
12-04-2009, 07:11 PM
We use WilsonArt. They used to be owned by someone else, but the name escapes me. It's basically the same thing as Titebond, but a different brand. Type II PVA glue. I've used Titebond in the past and we often use it when we can't ship our glue off island. Ever since 9/11, finding a company that will ship liquids and solvents, even inter island, is tough.

I like the quick set time over Titebond. A good joint will hold in under a minute and working set time can be as little as 5 minutes. I've tried to break joints in as little as ten minutes, after catching a last minute mistake. You'll break wood. The joints do remain slippery enough to move around for a bit, to final adjust positioning, then hold for about 15-30 more seconds and you can clamp without creeping.

maclay
12-05-2009, 08:37 PM
both the lmi glue and the Titebond are great, but i prefer the lmi glue. as long as there is not a lot of squeeze out, the glue should dry clear. as always, the key is glue control......using the correct amount of glue will eliminate most of your problems.
and when in doubt, use hide glue!

Matt Clara
12-06-2009, 04:32 AM
Sounds like the start of G.A.S.







Glue Acquisition Syndrome!! :D

I got me some GAS. Went out and bought some gorilla glue this morning to help feed the beast.
;)

Steve vanPelt
12-06-2009, 07:32 AM
I got me some GAS. Went out and bought some gorilla glue this morning to help feed the beast.
;)

Oooh, gorilla GAS....keep the windows open :eek:

curlykoa
12-07-2009, 09:33 AM
Thanks for all the feedback. I've done the gluing up here in the house. 'Have been pondering Moore Bettah's warning: "more serious issues down the road"...expansion and contraction disasters vis a vi the gluing in cool temps? Time will tell.

This morning the outside temperature was 8 degrees and I spent some time in the basement hanging up visquene etc. to make the space small enough for an electric space heater to work. Plugged it is and it's warmed up from 30 degrees to 45 in there and feels toasty! But I have taken all warnings to heart and am trying to mitigate the looming problems.

Aloha

Pete Howlett
12-07-2009, 10:13 AM
A dehumidifier might help or at least a cabinte where you keep the wood at a constant temperature and relative humidity of between 45% and 55%. heat is not the only thing you need...

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
12-07-2009, 10:53 AM
Time will tell.

Yep, and you won't have to wait long. Just as soon as it warms up a bit.
You really should be trying to build in an environment that is as close to 65 -70 degrees and 50% RH as you can. This is critical. We see lots of amateur builds turn to rubbish as soon as the weather changes or the uke is moved to a different environment. I'm on solar power only, yet I am able to build in a room with air conditioning and dehumidifiers, so it can be done. Also, don't ignore what's happening to your work when you close down the shop for the day. At the minimum your work in progress should be stored in a dry, stable environment. A closet with a light bulb or two burning should handle it. They even make closet heating rods that are probably safer than the light bulbs. I use a couple of tiny "Eva-Dry" dehumidifiers for over night.