PDA

View Full Version : Humidifiers!



Sic_Rob
01-08-2010, 04:37 AM
So I have my first real big boy (or big person) Uku on it's way. I ordered a Mahogany Concert from Mike at Mainland thanks to his help and all of the feedback that I received from the UU populationg. Thanks all.

Now my question is do I need a humidifier in the case? As I said, I ordered a solid Mahogany. i live in the North East coast of the USA which I'm sure might make a difference. If the uku is effected by the weather as bad as my sinuses then I am guessing that I should get 1 right away. Can I get come feed back on this? You all have not let me down yet so thanks in advance.

UkuleleHill
01-08-2010, 04:47 AM
In your area its probably a good idea to have a humidifier, but I wouldn't go get an expensive one. You can make one like this easy and cheap!

http://ukuleleunderground.com/2008/02/11/uke-minutes-4-diy-ukulele-case-humidifier/

molokinirum
01-08-2010, 04:59 AM
In your area its probably a good idea to have a humidifier, but I wouldn't go get an expensive one. You can make one like this easy and cheap!

http://ukuleleunderground.com/2008/02/11/uke-minutes-4-diy-ukulele-case-humidifier/

Thanks for the link, this is a simple idea and easy to do!!!
Mahalo again!!

maui.mike
01-08-2010, 06:55 AM
Great idea for a humidifier. I am going to go out and pick up some pez dispensers this weekend. :)

Big Bob
01-08-2010, 08:00 AM
I am located in the northeast maritime provinces of Canada and I am the proud owner of a solid koa kanilea tenor ukulele.Humidity was a big concern for me in the winter months.In my uke case I have a planet waves hygrometer and a herco humidyfier and two 35 milimerter film canisters with a wet sponge inside with pin holes in the caps.Needless to say It's getting crowded in the uke case.But I found out that it's important to zip up the uke case to maintain humidity above 45%. In other words don't just close the cover ,zip it up. Hope this helps.

luvdat
01-09-2010, 04:09 AM
In your area its probably a good idea to have a humidifier, but I wouldn't go get an expensive one. You can make one like this easy and cheap!

http://ukuleleunderground.com/2008/02/11/uke-minutes-4-diy-ukulele-case-humidifier/

I have to comment on this video and please do not be offended anyone including A.G.. As an RN who has worked in an emergency room, the drilling part of this video leaves a lot to be desired.

How much is your left hand worth? 12 bucks?

Especially for younger folks on UU who may suddenly "borrow" their Dad's drill, you could end up with plenty of humidity here...when the drill slips into skin, muscle and nerve tissue. Such an accident takes a Uke Second.

leftovermagic84
01-09-2010, 04:17 AM
Another option that isn't usually talked about is to just humidify your entire music room. My wife plays a bit of piano and guitar, and when you throw my ukes into the mix, its just easier to plug one of these in and call it a day.

http://www.amazon.com/Vicks-Warm-Mist-Humidifier-Shut-Off/dp/B001FWXKTA/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1263050030&sr=8-3

I still have a couple of hercos for when i take a uke with me somewhere, but for the most part, its easier to worry about refilling one tank than several little hercos. Just a thought

luvdat
01-09-2010, 05:23 AM
Another option that isn't usually talked about is to just humidify your entire music room. My wife plays a bit of piano and guitar, and when you throw my ukes into the mix, its just easier to plug one of these in and call it a day.

http://www.amazon.com/Vicks-Warm-Mist-Humidifier-Shut-Off/dp/B001FWXKTA/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=hpc&qid=1263050030&sr=8-3

I still have a couple of hercos for when i take a uke with me somewhere, but for the most part, its easier to worry about refilling one tank than several little hercos. Just a thought

I also think "reaching for perfection" can backfire. Sure, sustained dry is bad, but sudden frequent changes may be worse. Now that you've got your uke "perfect" in the case, play it for how many hours in what kind of room, place?

Paul December
01-09-2010, 06:02 AM
I also think "reaching for perfection" can backfire. Sure, sustained dry is bad, but sudden frequent changes may be worse. Now that you've got your uke "perfect" in the case, play it for how many hours in what kind of room, place?

It's not so much the change of humidity in the room, as in the instrument. While wood can change temperature relatively quickly, It dries out much slower. I've read many warnings of how bad "sudden" shifts of (room) humidity are. Do people mean to say "drastic", because I find it difficult to believe "sudden" would have much effect. OTOH prolonged exposure to a drastic change in humidity definitely would cause damage.

luvdat
01-09-2010, 04:31 PM
It's not so much the change of humidity in the room, as in the instrument. While wood can change temperature relatively quickly, It dries out much slower. I've read many warnings of how bad "sudden" shifts of (room) humidity are. Do people mean to say "drastic", because I find it difficult to believe "sudden" would have much effect. OTOH prolonged exposure to a drastic change in humidity definitely would cause damage.

Thanks for helping me finetune this...but I think when it comes down to it my sense of "sudden" is "sudden and drastic" related to temp as in cold outside into a warm house. In practice, for example, the need for letting the case adjust to the temp from coming outside esp. from the cold is what I do before opening it again. Yes, prolonged bad is pretty clear, but I think its good to let things gradually warm up, etc..and I'd apply this coming from outside in summer into AC.

The "sudden and drastic" has more visible effect in higher gloss instruments with more incremental effects in finishes...I think...and in tone with light gloss to zip. Also, of course, a dry string instrument gives you that "low action" some folks want, lol, not me. More than 2 weeks dry (lower temp/indoor higher temp with heat on)say, can be rememdied for the reason you stated: that instruments dry out more slowly. While the wood may "dry out more slowly" it can expand/contract more quickly. With those backs and forths when it DOES dry out, its worse then and harder to get back on track.

In short, I think it's ultimately easier to think of temp first in most situations. The range of acceptable RH makes temp more the dealbreaker.