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luvdat
01-10-2010, 01:54 AM
Hey, I know anyone could respond simply, "Because..." but I would like to know what makes them up their on your list. Feel free to also include a bit of history of the pineapple uke, in additional to the tonal pluses for you, and even to relate it a bit to the concert...just trying to get those pineapple juices flowing...on this really cold day in NJ...Go Jets!!!

deach
01-10-2010, 02:23 AM
If I have to explain, you just wouldn't understand.

jkevinwolfe
01-10-2010, 02:31 AM
(Not pineapple's specifically, but any uke with a body shaped like a ham can.) These oval body shapes have more liberated soundboard to vibrate. Depending on the wood the soundboard is made of, this usually means longer sustain and a warmer tone.

luvdat
01-10-2010, 06:02 AM
If I have to explain, you just wouldn't understand.

Thanks deach for your response. With respect to "sound" there's no substitute for experience. Only experience can help us assess the sound of anything.

pdxuke
01-10-2010, 06:58 AM
Part of it is a feeling of tradition, part of it is whimsey. I like the difference in sound as well. What I don't like is finding a hard case!

luvdat
01-10-2010, 07:09 AM
(Not pineapple's specifically, but any uke with a body shaped like a ham can.) These oval body shapes have more liberated soundboard to vibrate. Depending on the wood the soundboard is made of, this usually means longer sustain and a warmer tone.

Ahnko Honu made some, not exactly of course connection to the sound of a concert...

Ahnko Honu
01-10-2010, 07:23 AM
To ME a pineapple is extra special because I grew up with a Kamaka pineapple ukulele in the house my dad bringing it out almost every aloha Friday for regular pau hana parties the sound of the Kamaka pineapple first heard while I was still in my momma's belly, and to me what a Hawaiian 'ukulele should sound like. This design is also uniquely Hawaiian designed by Sam Kamaka in the early 1920s and patented by him in 1928. Connections both personal and cultural.

luvdat
01-10-2010, 07:30 AM
To ME a pineapple is extra special because I grew up with a Kamaka pineapple ukulele in the house my dad bringing it out almost every aloha Friday for regular pau hana parties the sound of the Kamaka pineapple first heard while I was still in my momma's belly, and to me what a Hawaiian 'ukulele should sound like. This design is also uniquely Hawaiian designed by Sam Kamaka in the early 1920s and patented by him in 1928. Connections both personal and cultural.

Thanks for a real response in an organic context. It goes beyond the whole "idea of things" approach...or any attempt at sounding enlightened. Reading the blurb on the Kamaka site I felt oddly inspired for lack of a better word. It went beyond cranking out a product but something out of life.