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View Full Version : re: improving stock Cordoba 25CD uke



entfred
01-17-2010, 01:32 AM
I just purchased a Cordoba 25CK uke.

I went to two different stores that carried them and played three different ukes. Two of the ukes buzzed very bad and
the third uke I ended up getting at a reduced price has the bridge slightly coming off one one end and fret sprout.
It was the best sounding uke of the three.

I don't want to invest a lot of money fixing a few hundred dollar uke, but I was thinking it might not be so expensive to
fix this and give me some good practice on doing things I would not do to the Kala tenor uke I own (the Kala has perfect
workmanship and zero flaws).

I have a few files of various sizes, but I have never filed down fret sprout (i.e. would pay a luthier to do this). Is there a
particular sized file or sandpaper block or something that people recommend to use to file down frets sticking out on a
concert sized uke, such as the Cordoba 25CD uke?

Where is the best place to purchase a uke bridge, saddle, and nut?

Anyone try something like trimming the braces on this Cordoba? I think if the top was just a little thinner and/or
the bracing not as thick, this uke could really sing. As it is stock, it is not the loudest instrument, but just has a wonderful
tone.

Thanks for any advice on the above

---- Entfred

Matt Clara
01-17-2010, 02:26 AM
If by fret sprout you mean the ends are sticking out the sides of the fretboard, the first thing I would try is humidifying the uke. If you find you need to file the ends after that, just carefully apply masking tape between the frets and on the sides of the neck and take some small needle files and first file them back, and then round the edges. You may have to reapply tape in areas you wear through before completing the job. Take your time. If you want specialized tools for doing the job, they can be found at LMI (http://www.lmii.com/CartTwo/Secondproducthead.asp?CategoryName=Fretting) and StewMac (http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Fretting_supplies/Shaping_and_crowning.html). As for working on the insides of an already finished uke, I wouldn't. You won't be able to see what you're doing, so unless you have experience working on braces, you'll really be hacking at them, and it's unlikely you'll be able to reach them all without specialized tools and a way to see them. It's my opinion, and I am new at this luthier thing, if the body's glued shut, and it's screwed up inside, then that's a screwed up uke and that's all there is to it. My opinion may change if I screw one up made of expensive wood! Have you tried different strings?

entfred
01-17-2010, 05:35 AM
I have to get some new strings for it. They are not the best. Yeah - probably dumb idea to mess with the braces. I can try humidifying the uke, more. Plenty of humidity at home except for when the heater is on too much
(i.e. extreme cold outside). I have one of those sound hole humidifiers, I can try, too. Thanks for the explanation of the filing.

Matt Clara
01-17-2010, 06:47 AM
I have to get some new strings for it. They are not the best. Yeah - probably dumb idea to mess with the braces. I can try humidifying the uke, more. Plenty of humidity at home except for when the heater is on too much
(i.e. extreme cold outside). I have one of those sound hole humidifiers, I can try, too. Thanks for the explanation of the filing.

I'm happy to help, but you should wait for some of the pros to weigh in before you make up your mind.

entfred
01-22-2010, 05:16 AM
I decided to send the uke back for factory work on it to fix problems.