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View Full Version : Yoink! May have to sell my uke! What would be your hardest sacrifice?



buddhuu
02-05-2010, 03:51 AM
I seem to spend my life buying and selling instruments. My role in bands and sessions changes, so my instrument requirements change. Due to my own monumental stupidity and irresponsibility years ago, I am still climbing out of debt, so I can't just buy stuff. If I want something, then something else has to go.

I quit my band a while ago as the vibe had changed so much since we started it that the fun was waning. In the band I was mainly bluegrass mandolin and uke.

I now lead a folk session, and a folk band seems to be emerging from that session in much the same way as The Ploughmen emerged from a previous jam I started at the same local pub a few years ago. My duties now are mostly Irish trad mandolin and tin whistle. When uke is appropriate I can use my wife's soprano.

My bluegrass mandolin is really not appropriate for the genre. I need to buy a folk mandolin. This means I have to sell my current mando, a good carbonfibre fiddle bow and (AAARGH!) maybe my Kala tenor uke. It seems like only 5 minutes ago I was selling a mandolin to afford the Kala! It's a bummer because I'm not giving up 'ukulele, and I love my Kala. But I love the music I make with other people even more.

Looks like I may be walking everywhere soon as my car died too!

Anyway, it sounds worse than it is. I'm still a lucky guy with a lucky and happy life, and I'm having a great time with the music. I just like complaining! LOLz.

So, here's the nosy bit: If you had to sell something to buy a new instrument (or a new car!), what would you find hardest to part with, and why?

Melissa82
02-05-2010, 04:10 AM
Aw man, so sorry to hear about this all!

My uke would be the hardest, it is the only instrument I can play now. I have a keyboard that I never use (but hopefully that will change if I start song writing). Between my ukes, I think my Ohana would be the hardest to let go because it was my 1st one and it was a gift. If it wasn't for that uke, I'd never have bought my Mainland or received my Dawgnot as a gift (I love that little thing).

Rzr
02-05-2010, 04:26 AM
Sell your body instead, that's what I would do.

paraclete
02-05-2010, 04:37 AM
I could not sell my violin. I would have to be at the utter end of desperate. I've had it since the late 80s, and it is one of a kind. It's nearly 200 years old, and I would never be able to replace it.

Ukeffect
02-05-2010, 05:08 AM
Don't sell your body...but blood etc? That's a renewable source of cashflow if you are really strapped...AND it will let you keep your Kala!

leftovermagic84
02-05-2010, 05:22 AM
Don't sell your body...but blood etc? That's a renewable source of cashflow if you are really strapped...AND it will let you keep your Kala!

I sold plasma for a while in college. It's a nice little boost to the income, and the place I went generally had new release movies playing too, so it was almost like a free movie rental too.

Skitzic
02-05-2010, 05:22 AM
I couldn't sell my Breedlove. It was a gift, is the best guitar I own, and the person who gave it to me is no longer with us.

So yeah, that guitar will be buried with me.

Skitzic
02-05-2010, 05:23 AM
Don't sell your body...but blood etc? That's a renewable source of cashflow if you are really strapped...AND it will let you keep your Kala!

I hear you get more $ for your...uh...for other types of bodily fluids.

buddhuu
02-05-2010, 05:29 AM
Ahem, guys, the question is "what would be the hardest thing for you to sell", not "what soggy contribution would you willingly hawk around the clinics if you could find a buyer"! LOLz...

Skitzic
02-05-2010, 05:48 AM
Hey I'm just trying to help save another instrument from having to find a new home. I know a lot of people who really regret selling instruments.

:P

ukecantdothat
02-05-2010, 05:56 AM
Ahem, guys, the question is "what would be the hardest thing for you to sell", not "what soggy contribution would you willingly hawk around the clinics if you could find a buyer"! LOLz...

The hardest thing would be my red 100 watt '69 Marshall head. Even though my current line up has only uke, steel drum, bass & percussion, I just can't bring myself to part with it. I've seen it described on line as the holy grail of Marshall heads, but it was my first "real" amp when I got it in high school over 30 years ago. I think I'm better off sitting on it and passing it down to one of my kids one day if one becomes a guitarist. They may not,, but by then the value will really be thru the roof.

Brewerpaul
02-05-2010, 06:15 AM
Sorry to hear your troubles Budd. Hope things work out.
I shouldn't ask, but what Mando are you selling? Still have my Fullerton, but y'never know.
I don't suppose trading for a whistle would be of any help...

In response to your question, I guess as far as instruments go, that Fullerton mando would be my toughest one to sell. Items overall, I'd have to say my whistle making lathe.

gobes
02-05-2010, 06:34 AM
The easiest thing to sell would be the car.

didgeridoo2
02-05-2010, 06:36 AM
The hardest thing for me to sell would be one of my yidaki even though I haven't been playing them a whole lot since I started up with the uke. Yidaki is the word used to describe a didgeridoo crafted in Northeastern Arnhemland. They are crafted in the traditional way by the Yolgnu people who lay claim as the custodians of the instrument, even though the "didgeridoo" has been adopted as a symbol of all Australian Aboriginals, most other tribes have only played it for 1 or 2 hundred years. They can trace the use of yidaki in ceremony for about 3000 years and it is believed to have been used longer than that. Yidaki are instruments, but can be considered artifacts as well.

My prized Yidaki has been on display in a museum in Melbourne and I have a Youtube clip of a player who passed away a couple years ago. He was considered to be one of the top players when he was alive, having recorded the best resource for learning traditional playing styles. He was also the yidaki player for the Yolgnu rock band Yothu Yindi. His passing was tragic like a lot of top players and crafters because he ended up taking his own life.

The Yidaki was cut and crafted by the brother of the official custodian and painted by a former Australian artist of the year. The drone is the note F and the overtone note is F#. I have recently been thinking about selling some of my yidaki because I have been experiencing strong UAS, but wouldn't know where to start. This one would be my most valuable and I have 8 others that don't get played much.

Here is a the quick video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Afx8LUyR32s

Lori
02-05-2010, 06:56 AM
I didn't even know there was a "folk mandolin". What's the difference? Can you get by on what you have by using different strings or something? As you can tell, I know nearly nothing about mandolins. Anyway I would like to learn something.

I guess my Kanile'a SuperConcert is the thing I would most regret losing. I got that one in Hawaii last October for my birthday. Such a lovely instrument, the grain, the gloss finish, the sound and the craftsmanship makes it a total pleasure to play.

–Lori

Ukulele JJ
02-05-2010, 07:18 AM
Due to my own monumental stupidity and irresponsibility years ago, I am still climbing out of debt, so I can't just buy stuff. If I want something, then something else has to go.

[...]

So, here's the nosy bit: If you had to sell something to buy a new instrument (or a new car!), what would you find hardest to part with, and why?

First of all, congrats on a wise and sensible attitude toward debt! You'll be out of it no time with that sort of outlook.

We tend to imbue a musical instrument with a lot more personality/emotion/connection/memories than, say, a foot stool. But really, it's all just "stuff". It's wood and metal and plastic. Your larger goal is more important (and will yield more long-term satisfaction) than the far less significant goal of maintaining an attachment to another piece of stuff.

You can always buy another uke some day down the road. And, as you said, you'll still have one in the house to play.

As for me? I would never get rid of my keyboard (except to buy a better one) unless I was is serious financial trouble. I would sell my TV and most of my furniture first. It actually makes me a bit of money now and again, so it would be short-sighted to get rid of it anyway.

I have more than one uke, so to get rid of any of them wouldn't be too bad. As long as I have one left, I'm fine.

So I'm going with my accordion. If money got tight, it's a definite candidate for the chopping block since I would earn more money by selling it than by gigging with it. But man, that would suck. I love playing the thing.

JJ

ukecantdothat
02-05-2010, 07:33 AM
The hardest thing for me to sell would be one of my yidaki
Well, I would have to say, didgeri, don't! It sounds like priceless a one of a kind instrument you've got there and you're right to hang onto it. Good thing you have others to sacrifice if and when UAS becomes unbearable. Is there a "yidakiunderground?"

Ahnko Honu
02-05-2010, 07:38 AM
My firstborn son followed by my cat.

Moondoggie
02-05-2010, 07:40 AM
...If you had to sell something to buy a new instrument (or a new car!), what would you find hardest to part with, and why?

My wife, 'cause she's deceptively strong and has a really big brother.

Juan Sapatos
02-05-2010, 08:08 AM
We tend to imbue a musical instrument with a lot more personality/emotion/connection/memories than, say, a foot stool. But really, it's all just "stuff". It's wood and metal and plastic. Your larger goal is more important (and will yield more long-term satisfaction) than the far less significant goal of maintaining an attachment to another piece of stuff.
JJ

In 1988 I bought a '67 fender mustang for $200. It was never a very useful instrument. Horrible intonation. Anyway, despite that it was my first guitar and I loved it. Then Cobain started playing a Mustang and they became valuable. I traded it this Christmas for a very high tech musicman guitar for my son. I thought I would be heartbroken but it was liberating. He's such a better player than I will ever be. Let go of the stuff!

Lanark
02-05-2010, 08:38 AM
In 1988 I bought a '67 fender mustang for $200. It was never a very useful instrument. Horrible intonation...

Funny, I've got a '66 that's still in my keep pile of guitars. It was my workhorse for many years and I can't bring myself to part with it even though I'm not playing any guitar these days.

I used to think I wouldn't be able to part with my '67 Gretsch Country Gentleman, but since the current plan is to be living in Hawaii before the end of the year (my wife is from there and it's where her folks are.) it's currently on the block. That one I bought in 1988 for every red cent I owned.

However I think it'd be most heart wrenching for me to have to part with

http://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs183.snc3/19055_1346826477088_1424090374_30954697_1289957_n. jpg

a 1965 Martin GT-70. Never seen another one and I've had this guitar since 1983. I've brought this to places to get adjusted over the years and had gearheads scoff at it when I open the case only to make me cash offers when I come back to pick it up.

buddhuu
02-05-2010, 09:40 AM
I didn't even know there was a "folk mandolin". What's the difference? Can you get by on what you have by using different strings or something? As you can tell, I know nearly nothing about mandolins. Anyway I would like to learn something.[...]

Well, there are many names for the kind I need - flat top mando, Celtic mando, folk mando. Basically they have flat tops and backs (or a very shallow induced arch) rather than the carved arched back and top plates of A and F style bluegrass mandos. The sound is really very different - both more delicate and a little fuller at the same time. Oval hole mandos don't cut and project as dramatically as f hole models, but they usually have a better balanced bass response. More suited to jigs, reels, hornpipes etc than for shredding bluegrass breaks - and no way will you get a Monroe style chop out of a folk mando.

For me, I've always found it hard to play Celtic style with bluegrass mandolins. When I play bluegrass style I don't plant my picking hand. When I play Irish trad tunes I do, and a flat top mando gives my hand the support I need. The arch of a bluegrass mando means that the height of the bridge/strings above the bit where I rest my hand is too high for comfort and is pretty awkward for me.

The fretboards on folk mandos are often a bit wider too.

@ JJ: Thanks for the supportive words, bro. Appreciated. I'm fine. It'll all be good. :)

@ Brewerpaul: My mando isn't much over the Fullerton Gloucester, mate. A Gloucester with a nut and bridge upgrade would give mine a run for its money any day. I still miss my Fullerton. What a bargain those were!

buddhuu
02-05-2010, 09:43 AM
The hardest thing would be my red 100 watt '69 Marshall head. Even though my current line up has only uke, steel drum, bass & percussion, I just can't bring myself to part with it. I've seen it described on line as the holy grail of Marshall heads, but it was my first "real" amp when I got it in high school over 30 years ago. I think I'm better off sitting on it and passing it down to one of my kids one day if one becomes a guitarist. They may not,, but by then the value will really be thru the roof.
Oh wow!

There's nothing quite like the sound or smell of a warmed-up Marshall valve head! :drool:

didgeridoo2
02-05-2010, 09:49 AM
Well, I would have to say, didgeri, don't! It sounds like priceless a one of a kind instrument you've got there and you're right to hang onto it. Good thing you have others to sacrifice if and when UAS becomes unbearable. Is there a "yidakiunderground?"
It would be tough to unload that one, of course. The thing with didges is they play one note, with overtones (higher toot-like sounds) varying depending on the shape, length, material, etc....so, musically it's nice to have a range of instruments. I do have a plastic slide didge that acts like a trombone, ranging with potential of playing all notes, but there's nothing like the harmonics coming from a naturally hollowed out (eaten by termites) instrument made of eucalyptus.

There are a couple of great forums for didge players. There are a lot more issues at hand when you consider cultural integrity and many of the folks I've fallen in with are amateur ( and some professional) ethnomusicologists. The culture in the Northern Territory of Australia is in a crisis and it's a difficult situation for artistic spiritual people who been around for 50,000 years.

haolejohn
02-05-2010, 10:09 AM
Well let's see. I almost sold my sceptre 2 weeks ago to buy my new motorcycle. That's right I said my SCEPTRE. Thankfully my wife wouldn't let me. I do know that the hardest uke to let go would be my KoAloha concert b/c Papa KoAloha blessed me with it. Then it would be the Sceptre for obvious reasons or my wife's long neck KoAloha soprano b/c it sounds so sweet and it is for her. My double puka will be hard to let go of as well but I think it is not really mine so it'll end up somewhere else if that makes sense.

Buddhuu-Keep your head up (sounds like you are) and try not to fret. Play what you got and be patient.

CoLmes
02-05-2010, 11:11 AM
almost sold my xbox 360 once.. and considering selling plasma

ukecantdothat
02-05-2010, 12:19 PM
Oh wow!

There's nothing quite like the sound or smell of a warmed-up Marshall valve head! :drool:

You are so right about that, particularly the smell when it hasn't been used for a while. Dust collects on the top of the tubes and when it burns off... well... Breathe deep, y'all! I know, it sounds sick, but that's what all Marshall freaks will tell you (Unless they have solid state, in which case I should market a spray "odorizor" to imitate that beautifully putrid fragrance... Marshall in a can).

I just remembered there's a brief shot of it in my Strawberry Fields vid at about the 2 minute mark: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frUtU3SD7ME

buddhuu
02-05-2010, 02:10 PM
You are so right about that, particularly the smell when it hasn't been used for a while. Dust collects on the top of the tubes and when it burns off... well... Breathe deep, y'all! I know, it sounds sick, but that's what all Marshall freaks will tell you [...]
Yup. That's what I'm talking about. Many years ago I had a Vox AC30 that used to do the hot-dust smell thing. To be honest I don't know that I could tell the smell of a Marshall from the smell of an AC30, but that tube amp smell is pure rock and roll!

Uncle-Taco
02-05-2010, 02:56 PM
Been there (often), done that (a lot).

Some of the more tragic:

One I built (lost my job):
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2789/4248914451_5cd4dc0565_o.jpg

A 25/50 Anniversary Gibson Les Paul Custom (needed a refrigerator):
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1321/1254726630_ed8fc82a5d_o.jpg

A Gretsch Chet Atkins Nashville (needed a car):
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1149/1253865477_b7b7006ee9_o.jpg

I could go on and on; this is just a representative sampling.

Know what though, buddhu? They still make stuff like this every day, and people get rid of stuff like this every day. And while you don't have the stuff, you still have the memories and the music. I know it isn't that comforting, but you seem to have a grip on how life is and I know you'll understand this:
Stuff is wonderful, but at the end of the day, it's just stuff, brother. :shaka:

KamakOzzie
02-05-2010, 02:58 PM
The very hardest instrument for me to part with would be my upright bass. I've had it about 27 years and it's a real killer.
A 1907 Lyon & Healy 7/8 size, all carved. It's had its share of repairs over the years, but that only makes it sound better.
We were jamming under the ball field backstop at Galax several years ago, and someone came up to me and said " just walked over from the other side of the outfield fence to see the bass I had been listening to".
I would be brought to tears to have to part with her.

experimentjon
02-05-2010, 06:02 PM
Ukulele: KoAloha Sceptre. I had always wanted one, and I finally got one recently. And it's super sweet too, because my name is laser engraved into the top. It's mine, all mine. Plus, I had a Fishman Matrix put in there, and stickered it up, so it's a keeper.

Acoustic Guitar: Rainsong OM1000. I love that guitar. It just feels special every time. I just like carbon fiber anything.

Electric Guitar: Fender 62 RI Telecaster USA Limited Production Run Thin Skin in Mary Kay Whitewash finish. She's such a beauty.

Steiner
02-05-2010, 06:02 PM
Hardest thing to part with: Don Mattingly signed ball

clayton56
02-05-2010, 09:19 PM
for me probably my Selmer Eeb contra-alto clarinet (lower than a bass clarinet), it's gorgeous rosewood and sounds like a whole string section. However, I don't actually play it all that often. I have two banjos made from Stew-Mac parts that are irreplaceable - they don't offer those tone rings anymore.

buddhuu
02-06-2010, 12:36 AM
Ukulele: KoAloha Sceptre. I had always wanted one, and I finally got one recently. And it's super sweet too, because my name is laser engraved into the top. It's mine, all mine. Plus, I had a Fishman Matrix put in there, and stickered it up, so it's a keeper.[...]
Oh yeah! I saw the pictures of your KoAloha. A keeper if ever! Beautiful. :)

I absolutely agree with those who have said that stuff is just stuff. But isn't it funny how musical instruments almost seem to go a little bit beyond being simply stuff? Most of the things people have said that they would find hard to part with have been musical instruments.

Don't get my original post wrong. It's no huge calamity. I'm not having to go without music or instruments, just having to juggle stuff around to suit what I'm currently doing.

I restrung my wife's Stagg soprano last night and changed the crappy cheap geared tuners for fair friction pegs. It'll do fine for a back-up if the Kala does have to go.

I actually quite like sopranos! :)

Some of the stuff you guys have (or have had) may be just stuff, but some of it has had me drooling! LOLz.

Barbablanca
03-21-2011, 04:53 AM
As a newbie here, I hope it's OK to re-open an old thread.

Firstly, I hope you resolved the problems you were having last year, BuddhUU (funny, we got a guy with that nickname here in the small town in Catalonia where I live).

I would find it hardest to part with my Yamaha FG 180 Guitar. I've had it since 1973 and it gets sweeter with age. I wrote most of my earliest songs on it and then when I moved to Catalonia I lent it to my father and he played it in the last years of his life. I reacquired it from his bitch of a widow (but that's another story, worthy of a song). It'd be a real wrench to have to sell that... and what would I get for it, compared with the dear memories and good feeling that come out whenever I pick it up?

Mind you, it'd be pretty low down the list of instruments for sale, if it ever came to that... about 45th in the list to be precise. Yes, like many here, I suffer from MIAS (Musical Instrument Acquisition Syndrome) :D

Instruments really do take on a personality of their own, don't they, despite our efforts to see them in a Zen way as only wood and steel. (I'd love to know what happened to my Grandfather's bowl back mandolin, which disappeared when my grandma died, that was a treasured object to me as a boy, and probably just got junked when grandma's house was cleared out!!! I was out of the country at the time.

Nickie
03-21-2011, 07:09 AM
There are some neat comments here. Stuff is just stuff. I agree that musical instruments can be hard to part with. I used to have a beautiful old fiddle I bought in Nashville many years ago. I never got very good at it. When I found out that a very close friend's son was learning fiddle, I asked her if he would like to have mine. I didn't think I could have sold it to a stranger, but giving it to him was pure joy.
Americans are fascinated with, obsessed with, even owned by stuff. It's important to ask yourself periodically, "What can I do without?"
We make frequent trips to the Hospice Thrift Store to donate, it frees up some room for something we'd rather have.
The Aborigines have a saying: "The more you know, the less you need."
Very wise, indeed.
And don't worry about the car. If you're a good enough picker/player, people will give you rides, for a little gasoline money.

bazmaz
03-21-2011, 10:30 AM
buddhuu - for me it would be my Fender Strat.

Its a real nice one. - the story.

I was in the market for a new electric guitar, spending about 300-400 pounds. I spent a week trawling various local instrument stores, but nothing was floating my boat. I then, by absolute chance, came across a real dingy, dark old used instrument store that specialized in drums and basses. Kind of a metal / rock type place and went in.

Hanging on the wall, totally out of place with the various other instruments was a Fender Strat, with a humbucker, and a pearloid guard. USA made, with the upgraded saddles and machine heads so I knew it was a nice one, but I didnt know much about it (neither did the dealer). It was used, but absolutely mint and came with a hard case.

I asked the guy for a play, and maaaaaan, this thing was like absolute butter. It was an absolute joy. Price tag - 600. OUCH... Spent the rest of the afternoon playing it, and you guessed it, bought it. I am absolutely of the view that the guitar chose ME! The dealer was delighted too, because I figured he had trouble trying to shift it in a rock guitar store (its rather country looking and sounding!) - which may explain why it hadnt been snapped up before.

Anyway when I got it home did a lot of research - it turns out its a 2000 American Fat Strat Texas Special - a very high end Fender, with the upgraded pickups (including a Seymour Duncan) and rolled fingerboard edges - all the trimmings. Lovely looking wood grain, impeccable neck. At the time, the price I paid for it was about what they were exchanging for used, so i was happy.

That was about 5 years ago, and I did a bit of update checking on the net recently and found that these are now going for over 1000. Turns out that it was a short run that Fender replaced with the Lone Star series - very much similar but without the "trimmings".

I have had money shortages in the past and had to sell some stuff that did make me wince. If I was forced to sell my Strat I think I would rather lose a limb! Sweetest guitar I have ever played.

OldePhart
03-21-2011, 11:29 AM
Never let your stuff own you - I think we modern folks are all too guilty of that at times. My in-laws, even before they got old enough to make getting around difficult, reached the point that they would not even leave the house at the same time for more than a couple of hours for fear that somebody would steal their stuff while they were gone (and, frankly, they didn't really have much of anything that a self-respecting thief would go to the trouble of jimmying a lock for). It's just that as they got older they let their stuff own them.

I've got a lot of stuff, and some things I'd really miss if I had to give them up, but as long as I've got something that makes noise left I'll get by. If I ever get to the point where I won't go on vacation for fear of coming back to an empty house then I hope somebody does clean me out so I can get over that silliness!

John

Plainsong
03-21-2011, 12:01 PM
All the ukes I have now could go if there was an emergency. Not that I'm looking to sell!

I have two incoming that could never go. I'm in the queue for a curly myrtle Mya-Moe, and that will have my name in the label, so it's all mine. :) The other one is an incoming gift that means the world to me, and will get played the hell out of.

We could never sell the '73 Ibanez ric copy bass that Anders' brother gave him after he passed away, with the message that it was Anders that was the bass player.

I've sold off lots of stuff in the name of keeping a budget, but the one I regret most is a watch, a Sinn 356 UTC. But I have two other Sinns now so it deadens the pain.

pdxuke
03-21-2011, 01:12 PM
I could sell them all if need be--but if that happened I'd keep the Ohana SK35 as the "survival uke."

Hippie Dribble
03-21-2011, 01:53 PM
thought this verse from the New Testament might have some resonance with some of us. I should say, I don't mean to proselytise but it just kept coming back to me as I read through the responses on this thread...

"Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust decay and where thieves break in and steal, but rather, store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moth and rust do not decay and thieves do not break in and steal..."

and the punch: "for where your treasure is, there your heart will be also" Some years back I recorded an album and called it "Where Your Treasure Is". It's a great reminder for us to define what are our priorities in life. Bottom line: People matter. Stuff doesn't.

ukularwarhead
03-21-2011, 02:34 PM
@eugene ukulele:
The Good Book has all of the answers for life.

Plainsong
03-21-2011, 03:02 PM
:wallbash:

Nixon
03-22-2011, 02:02 AM
Guitar: Would have to be my 89 Fender HM strat. Basically worthless and butt ugly but it's easily the nicest guitar I've ever played and most guitarists I know think the same. http://media.photobucket.com/image/fender%20hm%20strat/hemmelight/Fender_HM_Strat_001-1.jpg Imagine this, but a whole lot more beaten up.

Uke: Don't technically own it yet but my Pete Howlett Tenor he's currently building me. It will be truly irreplaceable as it uses andaman padauk which is now an extinct species of tree, as well as madagascar rosewood(legally sourced before the export ban) which is nigh on impossible to get legally now but absolutely stunning to look at,