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View Full Version : The correct way (ukulele vs uke)



Howlie Boy
02-08-2010, 03:57 PM
I know we have had several discussions like this but its fun to have and see your opinions. The way to say it, some people say uke and some say ukulele. What's your opinion?

Here is mine, I say ukulele, reason is because i feel its more proper. This shortning of terms is looked down on in other aspects that I know of so maybe this is why my opinion is what it is. Like in the tattoo industry yoou never say tat or tatted. Generaly speaking its a slap in the face. Also growing up with a lot of Hawaiian and other island culture it was never called a uke. This is my opinion, what's yours?

deach
02-08-2010, 04:03 PM
:deadhorse::deadhorse::deadhorse::deadhorse:

Ron
02-08-2010, 04:24 PM
This is interesting ( to those of us, Deach, who haven't taken part in such a convo before ;-)).

New Zealand has a Polynesian culture too, of course, Maori. Many of our place names are Maori and some of our everyday language is Maori.
Since I was kid we've come a long way to respecting the language and trying to pronounce words properly and have pretty much scrapped various shortened Anglicised versions of Maori place names that we all used as a matter of course 30 years ago (Paraparaumu used to be Paraparam, Waipukerau was called Waipuck, Motueka was often just called Mot.). Quite a few of our landmarks now have two names because Maori and Englisdh are both official languages herei (Our tallest mountain is either Mt Cook or Aoraki, another is either Mt Egmont or Taranaki). There ARE place names (most notably Wanganui which properly should be spelt Whanganui and pronounced differently) that many feel is now an English word and shouldn't be changed. But generally in our culture it's respectful to use the correct name and try to pronounce people's names and other Maori words properly.
So - I'm imagining it's the same for Hawaiian speakers.
Soooo - I wouldn't now say yookalaylee. But I do say yook. Is "uke" now an English word? Can we use it withouit offence? Uke lends itself to puns more easily than ukulele, doesn't it? (says he of the Ukes of Hazard).
In New Zealand the language (te Reo) is "owned" or "protected" by the people as a treasure - so I tend to be led by the opinions of Maori. If they like their language to be spoken a certain way - who am I to argue?

deach
02-08-2010, 04:30 PM
This is interesting ( to those of us, Deach, who haven't taken part in such a convo before ;-))....

Let me summarize what's going to happen.

Half the people won't care, the other half will get offend. There will be a heated argument and this thread will join the rest of the locked uke vs ukulele threads.

rpeters
02-08-2010, 04:34 PM
Or we could all sit back, enjoy some tea and discuss the many connotations of the words "uke" and "ukulele" in a pleasant setting.


I use both words. When I talk to people who are familiar with the ukulele I say "uke", but when I'm talking to people who know very little about the ukulele I say "ukulele".

"Uke" makes me feel like I'm part of the ukulele community, as if its slang from a gang or group or something.

Melissa82
02-08-2010, 04:38 PM
Let me summarize what's going to happen.

Half the people won't care, the other half will get offend. There will be a heated argument and this thread will join the rest of the locked uke vs ukulele threads.That pretty much sums it up.

Ahnko Honu
02-08-2010, 04:59 PM
Just don't call it an "uku".

Melissa82
02-08-2010, 05:04 PM
Just don't call it an "uku".Why not? I see a lot of Europeans calling it that in the boards.

pithaya9
02-08-2010, 05:05 PM
Let me summarize what's going to happen.

Half the people won't care, the other half will get offend. There will be a heated argument and this thread will join the rest of the locked uke vs ukulele threads.

'ukulele :deadhorse: 'ukulele :deadhorse: 'ukulele :deadhorse:

LOL :rofl:

ukulelearp
02-08-2010, 05:09 PM
I don't mind using "uke" in conversation. In text, even on an informal message board, I prefer to write out the word. I'm one of those people who cares about grammar. I usually refrain from correcting others, though.

heyjude
02-08-2010, 05:35 PM
I call it a uke, pronounced yuke, or a ukulele, pronounced yukulele. Never ookulele and I always say "a" and not "an" ukulele. Not correct but I don't care, it's what I'm comfortable with.

Jude

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
02-08-2010, 05:54 PM
Why not? I see a lot of Europeans calling it that in the boards.

That's the one that really gets me. An "uku"is a flea, a nit, or more commonly, head lice! It's common to hear "MY daughter get ukus and have to keep her away from the other kids for a week." Sometimes you sit and scratch and scratch. Guaranteed you get ukus.

ukecantdothat
02-08-2010, 07:23 PM
Deach is right. Having said that, let me chime in anyway and say that, from what I've obzoived, in the mainland, it is trad to say both " a uke" and "a ukulele" (pronounced Yooka-lay-lee) and in Hawaii, where the name was coined, "an 'ukulele" and on occasion, "a uke." Being a mainlander myownself, it feels pretentious when I use the Hawaiian pronunciation around other mainlanders and the otherwise uninitiated, but online here in "mixed" company, I will stick the "an" in front of it as a gesture of respect. Never heard "uku" but I like Chuck's take on it! And having said that, I now defer back to deach.

Really, It dudn't much make no diff, y'all.

luvdat
02-08-2010, 08:17 PM
We're gonna be getting some real snow here in NJ up north this time...nice for...'ukin...

Ahnko Honu
02-08-2010, 08:17 PM
Why not? I see a lot of Europeans calling it that in the boards.

Just goes to show a lot of Europeans are wrong. As Chuck states Uku = head lice.

Kanaka916
02-08-2010, 08:46 PM
Chuck and Ahnko, Mahalos fo da responses on the word uku. My dos centavos . . . and I've posted this before. Being born and raised in the 808, uku has only one meaning and it's not a shortcut for 'ukulele. You can play the 'ukulele but you sure as hell won't play with an uku. As far as pronunciation, I agree with deach . . .

Let me summarize what's going to happen.

Half the people won't care, the other half will get offend. There will be a heated argument and this thread will join the rest of the locked uke vs ukulele threads.

BTW, here are some other threads . . .
http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?4501
http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?12021
http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?982

seeso
02-08-2010, 08:54 PM
I had spaghetti for dinner tonight.

Kanaka916
02-08-2010, 08:55 PM
I had some kind of pancit (I think?).

Ahnko Honu
02-08-2010, 10:24 PM
I had some kind of pancit (I think?).

I made some for dinner too, I guess great minds eat alike.

buddhuu
02-08-2010, 11:09 PM
Let me summarize what's going to happen.

Half the people won't care, the other half will get offend. There will be a heated argument and this thread will join the rest of the locked uke vs ukulele threads.
Yup.

One or two posts already seem to be inviting challenge. :rolleyes:

buddhuu
02-08-2010, 11:13 PM
Why not? I see a lot of Europeans calling it that in the boards.
Oy! :stop:

LOLz.

casarole45
02-09-2010, 01:36 AM
let me put it this way, I don't pronounce Irish words with a Irish accent in England. Same with Hawaii, your starting a debate about accents, its simple in English we pronounnce it Ukulele. You say tomate'o I say tomarto. Please stop this insanity!

luvdat
02-09-2010, 01:56 AM
I had some kind of pancit (I think?).

They might have been bihon noodles?

As far as ukus go, post-treatment have Mom comb out the nits...don't make the kid feel bad...she can come back to school just as long as there ain't live ukus.

Just trying to say something useful...BTW, the worst offenders are the French...I will try to get a Russian to say the word and report back to the forum my findings...maybe with a sound sample...a quality sound sample.

Actually, the most misused word on the forum is "an upgrade."

bazmaz
02-09-2010, 02:07 AM
Uke suits me!

http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=9796

ogikloavailable
02-09-2010, 02:30 AM
Well i think it's same. But in my place,sometimes people misspelled the word,so it become an Okulele
Hahaha

buddhuu
02-09-2010, 04:30 AM
[...] You say tomate'o I say tomarto. Please stop this insanity!
Reminds me... I'm out of ketchup.

Melissa82
02-09-2010, 04:36 AM
I tawt I taw a puddy tat!

hoosierhiver
02-09-2010, 04:44 AM
I tawt I taw a puddy tat!

Now those were great cartoons!

1014
02-09-2010, 04:54 AM
i'll take my cultural hegemony with kulolo, thank you.

jinny
02-09-2010, 04:56 AM
the kids at my daughter's elementary school call it, a "little guitar".
and a couple days ago, a 1st grader called it a "pretty banjo"

Swampy Steve
02-09-2010, 05:00 AM
dont matter to me ,,, but , I was at the library and the librarian was looking for ukulele books for me. She asked me how to spell it , I spelled ukulele, she said "No theres a "a" in the word somewhere, ahhh no

jinny
02-09-2010, 05:10 AM
... she said "No theres a "a" in the word somewhere, ahhh no

ahem... an "a"

;)

Sic_Rob
02-09-2010, 05:57 AM
Just don't call it an "uku".

Just don't call it late for dinner!

Sic_Rob
02-09-2010, 05:59 AM
We're gonna be getting some real snow here in NJ up north this time...nice for...'ukin...

Uku'in with my daughters while watching the snow come down, Sounds like a great idea.

dhkane
02-09-2010, 06:05 AM
Put it to rest, you can call it uke or ukulele. But don't call it uku.

ukecantdothat
02-09-2010, 06:45 AM
I had spaghetti for dinner tonight.

Me, too! That's so weird... Two weeks ago, my son, who's only eight, sunk a 3 pointer from half court. So weird...

Howlie Boy
02-09-2010, 08:21 PM
Let me summarize what's going to happen.
g
Half the people won't care, the other half will get offend. There will be a heated argument and this thread will join the rest of the locked uke vs ukulele threads.



Only The people that take things to serious will think this offensive. it is fun to have an opinion and all should be open to accepting others opinions. this site is world wide people from lots of other countries may have different ways of doing things. and yes this may to end up with the rest of the locked threads until another gets started. Until then lets read and be open minded.

buddhuu
02-09-2010, 11:51 PM
Only The people that take things to serious will think this offensive. [...]
Possibly true, but history bears out Deach's theory.

It's not the topic that's been the problem, just the inability of some contributors to keep calm. Who knows, this time may be different. ;)

44fanatic
02-12-2010, 01:54 AM
Or we could all sit back, enjoy some tea

Could I have coffee instead?

luvdat
02-12-2010, 02:18 AM
Could I have coffee instead?

Decaf for everyone! Or 2mg. of Ativan. Let's wait till we go for the Haldol.

HaileISela
02-12-2010, 04:03 AM
Let me summarize what's going to happen.

Half the people won't care, the other half will get offend. There will be a heated argument and this thread will join the rest of the locked uke vs ukulele threads.

I'm with the offended.

if you call it by the wrong name, I'm gonna come and do some Maculele:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZW-JNu7V4ek

MartinLil
02-12-2010, 04:37 AM
Just don't call it an "uku".

I agree! I cannot stand when someone uses the word "uku" in place of uke or ukulele. Also, ukulele has one correct pronunciation. Use that one and only that one!

cerebus
02-12-2010, 05:07 AM
I agree! I cannot stand when someone uses the word "uku" in place of uke or ukulele. Also, ukulele has one correct pronunciation. Use that one and only that one!

The idea of the "correct" pronunciation is interesting... If you talk to a linguist/language nerd, they would insist that there is no such thing as a correct pronunciation as language is forever changing, being exchanged between cultures, etc. That said, I can totally understand the desire to keep the association to Hawaiian culture via the traditional pronunciation.

I admit, I do say yook you leh lee, but only because it is what I had forever heard it by. That said, in my mind, this pronunciation makes me think of the 1950's singing cowboy (think a cross between woody from toy story and Will Rodgers-- I don't know if either even played a ukulele!). The original Hawaiian makes me think of traditional music, while Uke makes me think of the various youtube videos of uke covers. I know, it doesn't make sense, but each word/pronunciation gives me a different musical connotation.

All that said, while I currently only aspire to playing "uke" music, I still call it the incorrect name... Sorry to my Hawaiian friends, I promise that I am working on it!

molokinirum
02-12-2010, 05:12 AM
Put it to rest, you can call it uke or ukulele. But don't call it uku.

:agree: For me if I write it it is a uke. If I speak it it is a ukulele.
But NEVER, NEVER, NEVER is it EVER a uku!!!!! (NEVER)

Ukulele JJ
02-12-2010, 06:26 AM
Also, ukulele has one correct pronunciation. Use that one and only that one!

Ukulele has one correct Hawaiian pronunciation, true.

But to insist that a word should be pronounced exactly the same in every language is a bit unrealistic, don't you think?

I'm willing to bet that you use words that come from languages other than English pretty much every day, and that you do not pronounce them the way they would be pronounced in their language of origin. You're speaking English, so you use the common, English pronunciation of the word. Makes sense to me.

People call that island south of Florida "kyoo-buh" instead of a "koo-bah". They drink "socky" instead of "sah-keh". They ask the guy making their sandwich at the deli for "pro-vuh-LOAN" instead of "pro-voh-LOH-neh". And you know what? It's no big deal when they do!

I get that there is a rich, native Hawaiian culture that unfortunately has, for generations, been slowly eroding. That's a sensitive issue, and rightly so. But jeez, when someone simply uses the common, Webster's-supported English pronunciation of "ukulele", it's not some grand, evil act of Western imperialism. It's just someone speaking in the language they're used to.

It's interesting that the free and happy aloha spirit and chilled-out "do your own thing" vibe that supposedly possesses every ukulele player suddenly goes smack out the window and temporarily turns otherwise cool people into uptight pedants when it comes to pronouncing a single freakin' word.

JJ

HaileISela
02-12-2010, 06:37 AM
It's interesting that the free and happy aloha spirit and chilled-out "do your own thing" vibe that supposedly possesses every ukulele player suddenly goes smack out the window and temporarily turns otherwise cool people into uptight pedants when it comes to pronouncing a single freakin' word.

JJ

:agree:

but do we really have to have this discussion again? this always ends up with people getting angry...

maybe we should put another thing to the golden rule:

"Don't be a jerk and NEVER EVER ask for the pronounciation of 'ukulele"

^^

didgeridoo2
02-12-2010, 06:59 AM
I agree! I cannot stand when someone uses the word "uku" in place of uke or ukulele. Also, ukulele has one correct pronunciation. Use that one and only that one!

That's funny coming from someone who probably says "wooder" instead of water. ;)

Now I am off to play my novelty guitar.

ukecantdothat
02-12-2010, 07:03 AM
:agree:

but do we really have to have this discussion again? this always ends up with people getting angry...

maybe we should put another thing to the golden rule:

"Don't be a jerk and NEVER EVER ask for the pronounciation of 'ukulele"

^^

When Deach said this would degenerate into people getting offended, I thought, "Nah..." , but he's usually right about this stuff, so I've been following this thread and checked the others dealing with the topic, and sho' 'nuff... I mean, what's in a name, right? Can't we all just get along? (Where have I heard that before?)

This bears repeating:

UU is a place to be happy and free, to share the spirit of Aloha and meet likeminded people.
please don't turn it into a place of narrow-mindedness, suspiciousness and hatred.
mahalo

didgeridoo2
02-12-2010, 07:19 AM
When Deach said this would degenerate into people getting offended, I thought, "Nah..." , but he's usually right about this stuff, so I've been following this thread and checked the others dealing with the topic, and sho' 'nuff... I mean, what's in a name, right? Can't we all just get along? (Where have I heard that before?)

This bears repeating:

UU is a place to be happy and free, to share the spirit of Aloha and meet likeminded people.
please don't turn it into a place of narrow-mindedness, suspiciousness and hatred.
mahalo

The ukulele community isn't the only music community that deals with this. I'll refer to the didgeridoo community as having many heated debates regarding this issue. There are types of traditional didges called Yidaki and Mago. They come from communities that aren't far from each other. They have different dynamics and shape and are played differently in each of the communities. If the didge is crafted outside of those communities, even if by another aboriginal community, then it is considered a didgeridoo, or didjeridu, or didge, or even didj. Didgeridoo is a word given to the instrument by the western man. And generally it is the western man who argues about the treatment of the name on forums. It can get interesting and it can get personal.

ukecantdothat
02-12-2010, 07:59 AM
The ukulele community isn't the only music community that deals with this. I'll refer to the didgeridoo community as having many heated debates regarding this issue. There are types of traditional didges called Yidaki and Mago. They come from communities that aren't far from each other. They have different dynamics and shape and are played differently in each of the communities. If the didge is crafted outside of those communities, even if by another aboriginal community, then it is considered a didgeridoo, or didjeridu, or didge, or even didj. Didgeridoo is a word given to the instrument by the western man. And generally it is the western man who argues about the treatment of the name on forums. It can get interesting and it can get personal.

How odd... Being the smart-ass I am sometimes, I was thinking of putting into my last post, "I wonder if didgeridoo players get into this..." but I thought better of it! I'll have to check out the didgeridoounderground sometime. They sound like a fun group, too!

buddhuu
02-12-2010, 09:28 AM
Same thing occasionally happens with bodhran and uillean pipes. People say them wrongly, or with the wrong regional pronunciation, someone else corrects the "error" and gets invited to kiss the original speaker's posterior. Downhill from there...

Musicians are touchy souls. At an informal acoustic session a couple of months ago a bloke told me that he played bodhran. I said "Excellent, drag it along and give it a batter sometime."

"Batter?" he huffed, indignantly. "Batter? I'm a musician. I don't batter: I play."

Whatever.

Well good for him. He may have been a virtuoso, but he pronounced bodhran with an audible "d". Tut tut.

DogBisquit
02-12-2010, 09:48 AM
Reminds me... I'm out of ketchup.

You mean "catsup"?

ukecantdothat
02-12-2010, 10:59 AM
You mean "catsup"?

Now see here, you! Just because the lable sez "catsup" dud'n mean I gotta go an' stop sayin' "ketchup" now, dud'n it? Which reminds me... I'm outta club soda, erm... I mean... seltzer...

Ukuleleblues
02-12-2010, 11:18 AM
I have an idea. If an "official" spelling and pronunciation could be decided on then you could bless folks to use the "slang" terms as they see fit. Kind of like the slang used so frequently to refer to genitalia or the act of having sex. We do it all the time for lots of things, like your vehicle. No one says I'm going to jump in my "Toyota Prius Hybrid vehicle (in correct Japanese)" and get a pack of american blended tobacco cigarettes. They are more likely to say "I'm jumping in my toaster and get some coffin sticks, smokes, fags, etc."

I was laying in bed last night thinking about this and could't get to sleep. It reminded me of the time I performed an old Willie Dixon Blues tune, Dead Presidents. It starts off "A little bit of Lincoln can't park the the car, Washington he don't go to far, Jefferson is good if you gonna play that track... if you think you gonna bring some big fish back. Them Dead Presidents, Dead Presidents, I ain't broke, I'm badly bent, everyone needs them Dead Presidents."

See it's a song about money, Dead Presidents is slang for currency. But the wrinkle is in later lyrics it refers to a 100 dollar Franklin, and Franklin wasn't a president. So this guy with a seriously pained look after the show tells me that "You know Franklin wasn't a President". So I think here I am playing a ukulele singing the blues about the slang reference for money and I am causing some poor fellow discomfort. The thought of analyzing the correctness of lyrics based on slang was not even remotely considered by me. I felt really bad, for me, for him, for everyone. It's all about values, communication and our perception of reality.

Reminds me of that joke about the dog at the Western Union. You know the punch line. The dog wants to send a message: woof woof woof woof woof and the guy behind the counter helpfully says "You know for the same amount of money you can add another woof" and the dog replies back sarcastically "What sense would THAT make".

BTY, I had hot sauce injected whole chicken cooked in a Smoker Grill on a beer can holder with Cherry wood for dinner. It was real tender.

Woof Woof Woof Woof

Ukulele JJ
02-12-2010, 02:51 PM
Reminds me of that joke about the dog at the Western Union. You know the punch line. The dog wants to send a message: woof woof woof woof woof and the guy behind the counter helpfully says "You know for the same amount of money you can add another woof" and the dog replies back sarcastically "What sense would THAT make".

Reminds me of the joke about the guy who goes with his friend to a bar where a bunch of comedians hang out. One of the comedians shouts out "47!" and everyone laughs. Later, one of them yells "925!", and there's laughter again.

They guy turns to his friends and asks, "What's going on here?"

The friend says, "Well these guys are old pros. They know every joke there is and have heard and told them all a million times. So they just assign each joke a number to save time."

"Oh, I see," says the guy, "I think I'll give it a shot myself!" And with that, he yells out "18!"

Silence. An uncomfortable cough from the corner. Somewhere, a cricket chirps.

The guy looks at his friend, confused.

The friend says, "I guess some people just can't tell a joke."



JJ

Ukuleleblues
02-12-2010, 03:02 PM
I love it!!

Mim
02-12-2010, 03:07 PM
I have said this before... but I suppose I will say it every time this comes up... but you guys will have to forgive the fact that I says Ukulele with the "Yoo" sounds and I say "Uke". I am from the south, southern accent and all. I use the phrase "bless your/his/her heart" for everything. People would much rather see a 'fiddle' player than a 'violin' player. Saying 'ukulele would come across as well as saying "chap" without a British accent. It sort of sounds ostentatious and people would probably look at me funny. It sounds "right" coming from those of Hawaiian decent or from people who have lived in Hawaii or even people who do not have an accent. And when I am with people "in the ukulele know" I try to remember to pronounce it correctly. But still... often I don't. Plus, being from where I am from and having a very "mountain-folk" family, they would tease me for being pretentious. Seriously yall ;)! So I say, you say po-tay-to, I say po-ta-to... let's call the whole thing off!

But I agree... uku is weird.

Kanaka916
02-12-2010, 03:19 PM
Well, IMHO, I don't think you can beat an old fashioned Meat Loaf and Macaroni n Cheese for comfort food. But if you're in the 808, that can be drastically changed.

Ukuleleblues
02-12-2010, 03:51 PM
I have said this before... but I suppose I will say it every time this comes up... but you guys will have to forgive the fact that I says Ukulele with the "Yoo" sounds and I say "Uke". I am from the south, southern accent and all. I use the phrase "bless your/his/her heart" for everything. People would much rather see a 'fiddle' player than a 'violin' player. Saying 'ukulele would come across as well as saying "chap" without a British accent. It sort of sounds ostentatious and people would probably look at me funny. It sounds "right" coming from those of Hawaiian decent or from people who have lived in Hawaii or even people who do not have an accent. And when I am with people "in the ukulele know" I try to remember to pronounce it correctly. But still... often I don't. Plus, being from where I am from and having a very "mountain-folk" family, they would tease me for being pretentious. Seriously yall ;)! So I say, you say po-tay-to, I say po-ta-to... let's call the whole thing off!

But I agree... uku is weird.

Yes yes yes once down here at an Oyster Roast I pronounced Van Gogh "the correct way" and this dude threw me down an performed the heimlich maneuver. He was just trying to help.

ukecantdothat
02-12-2010, 04:17 PM
Yes yes yes once down here at an Oyster Roast I pronounced Van Gogh "the correct way" and this dude threw me down an performed the heimlich maneuver. He was just trying to help.

Yeah, I had an art history prof who did the "Van Gock" bit and half the class rolled their eyes at the perceived pretense, but by the end of the course they were all a-Gock-in' like Dutchmen!

Uncle-Taco
02-12-2010, 04:58 PM
East is still east and west is still west and if you take cranberries and stew them like applesauce, it tastes a lot more like prunes than rhubarb does.

And yeah, I have a tattoo, not a tat. For that matter, It ain't a tat[pause]too, too.

And I don't care how anybody pronounces Nevada. (The h is not only silent, it's invisible.)

[hiccup...]

dnewton2
02-12-2010, 05:47 PM
BTY, I had hot sauce injected whole chicken cooked in a Smoker Grill on a beer can holder with Cherry wood for dinner. It was real tender.

Woof Woof Woof Woof

That sounds delicious!

Woof Woof?

KvnO
02-13-2010, 10:41 AM
Forgive me if I don't understand the logic in this thread, but I'll write out my understanding to make sure it's correct.

"Ukulele" can be translated to "jumping flea." But calling the instrument an "uku" is right out because "uku" means part of exactly what the proper name translates to.

However, if you create an ukulele to be sold to thousands, calling it a "Flea" is perfectly acceptable (as illustrated by Flea Market Music).

Is that right? And if so, can you understand why I don't get he big deal about the word "uku?"

ukecantdothat
02-13-2010, 01:21 PM
... if so, can you understand why I don't get he big deal about the word "uku?"
I believe, as Chuck Moore pointed out, it's because "uku" in Hawaii is commonly used to refer to head lice. So, it's really more amusing than "wrong" to say it when refering to the ukulele.

Papa Dave
02-13-2010, 01:45 PM
Due to the fact that Monday comes on Tuesday this Wednesday our weekly Thursday meeting will be on Friday this Saturday.
Since Sunday is a holiday.
Attendance is mandatory!

Thumper
02-13-2010, 01:56 PM
Because I'm such a big fan of Sade, I now call the pointy metal part of a knife the "blarday."

seeso
02-13-2010, 02:25 PM
This thread has probably run its course.