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kissing
03-10-2010, 02:45 AM
Like many ukers, I really dislike the E and Eb chord.

But I just realised something that might work for me LOL.
Apparently the Bb chord shape, if you use the same shape of it in higher frets, it will play the chord that many semitones up.

ie: Bb chord <one fret up> B --->C ---> C# ----> D etc.

So if you play the Bb chord shape 6 frets up, you have your E (1st finger on 7th fret).
It does sound unusually high, but realising that chords transpose up n down just added a whole new set of chords to my arsenal.
I imagine the same applies for any other chord shapes that fret all 4 strings (like Bminor---> Cminor ---> C#minor---> etc).

I would always have trouble recognising weird chords like C# or C#minor or G#, etc... but now I can just power chord them, HAHA!

kissing
03-10-2010, 02:58 AM
*just learns that man cannot live on power chords alone*


unless you like random high chords in the middle of nowhere LOL

rvabdn
03-10-2010, 03:10 AM
I could be wrong but I don't think 'power chord' is the right term. Form a guitar point of view you're talking about bar chords I've heard them called moveable chords on the uke.

Power chords on a guitar are bar chords where you only play the root notes of the chords. They tend to be shaped like E or A on the guitar and you play only the 456 strings for the E shapes and 345 for the A shapes. The B chord on a uke is really a barred A which is the same fingering as an E on the guitar so to play the power chord using that form you would need 2 more strings(456).

rvabdn
03-10-2010, 03:29 AM
Sorry.

I was wrong about the root notes thing. A power chord contains the root note of the chord the fifth note and the root note again an octave higher. If you're playing a B as 4322 then there is an Eb in there that shouldn't be in a power chord.

Kanaka916
03-10-2010, 03:30 AM
You should also learn the chord inversions, for example; D7 is 2223 and you can play it as 5155, F is 2010 and can be played as 5553.

kissing
03-10-2010, 03:47 AM
HMm "power chord" seems to be the wrong term for it. My guitar playing friend told me that's what it was, but wikipedia tells me something completely different.

As Richard said, these are technically bar chords or 'moveable' chords.

Melissa82
03-10-2010, 04:22 AM
HMm "power chord" seems to be the wrong term for it. My guitar playing friend told me that's what it was, but wikipedia tells me something completely different.

As Richard said, these are technically bar chords or 'moveable' chords.Yup, the correct term is "movable chords."

csibona
03-10-2010, 04:25 AM
You should also learn the chord inversions, for example; D7 is 2223 and you can play it as 5155, F is 2010 and can be played as 5553.

I wish I could play 5155 - to my fingers it doesn't even seem possible... You can play this on a tenor? I think it might work for me on a soprano. By golly I have a lot to learn...

thejumpingflea
03-10-2010, 05:03 AM
A 'Power" chord is really just a 5 chord. (The 1st and 5th note of the scale, in the case of C it would be C and G)

Technically, it isn't a chord at all as it only contains two notes. 0033 is your C5 on the uke and that is your real power chord. ;)

the52blues
03-10-2010, 06:14 AM
Here we go...."Bar" chord is actually spelled "Barre" chord and can apply to any root chord moved up the neck using the first finger to Barre a fret acting as the nut i.e. on guitar we take the E chord and play it with 3,4,5 and barre the fret behind this form with the first finger. We also do this with the A chord. I've seen it done with the D chord but that one is harder than it's worth. I also use the C7 chord and move it up the neck (not a barre chord but a movable chord) and block the E strings. This can also be called an "Inside" chord. By using the E (or if you prefer F) , A (or Bb) and C7 forms you can place most 3 chord songs in almost any key or do key changes during the song.

SailingUke
03-10-2010, 06:17 AM
the beauty of a uke over guitar is the ease in which you can play moveble chords.
It is much easier with 4 strings than 6. Any chord shape can be moved up the neck.
3 notes make up a major chord (1,3,5). The "C" (0003) shape can be moved to the 4th fret (4447) for an easy "E"
If you can learn the fret board and identify the root note in any chord shape you should be able to figure out how to move it up the fret board.
You can attempt to memorize all the chord shapes or learn a little theory which I believe is easier.
Playing chords in different positions, also known as an inversion, can really add to your playing.
I find when jamming in a group I look for different inversions just to add some dynamic to the group.
For example when everyone is playing "C" in first position (0003), I play 2nd position (5433).
A little practive and they become second nature. The book "Fretboard Roadmap" is an excellent reference.

gobes
03-10-2010, 06:44 AM
I wish I could play 5155 - to my fingers it doesn't even seem possible... You can play this on a tenor? I think it might work for me on a soprano. By golly I have a lot to learn...

I think that he meant 5655.

csibona
03-10-2010, 06:56 AM
I think that he meant 5655.

Whew, that I can do. Unfortunately it still doesn't decrease the amount I have to learn.

Nurdaben
03-10-2010, 07:42 AM
Kissing, I posted this in another thread. Don't know if it will help ya out



http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c275/Nurdaben/chordforms.gif

8890
03-10-2010, 08:42 AM
Whew, that I can do. Unfortunately it still doesn't decrease the amount I have to learn.
Sure it does! 5155 makes no sense, but 5655 is a chord shape I'm sure you already know.

5655 is the A7 shape (0100), but five frets higher, because D is five frets (semitones) above A.

SailingUke
03-10-2010, 10:40 AM
Whew, that I can do. Unfortunately it still doesn't decrease the amount I have to learn.

I really urge you take some time and learn just a bit of chord theory. It can be boring, but once you understand the theory of chords you will find them all over the fretboard.
If you know where the root note in a chord is you can move it anywhere.
Memorization is much more difficult and tedious.

Some folks learn all the chords in 1st position. The move on to 2nd, then 3rd, ....etc.
I prefer teaching one shape ("A" for example) and sliding it all the way up the neck. Then pick another shape and repeat.
Four chord shapes and you can learn 50+ chords.

BarbaryBill
03-10-2010, 11:03 AM
I wish I could play 5155 - to my fingers it doesn't even seem possible... You can play this on a tenor? I think it might work for me on a soprano. By golly I have a lot to learn...

There are many chords which are apparently a physical impossibility. I have in fact decided to grow a third hand to accommodate some of these chords. seems the only way forward.

Stew