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david98116
05-19-2008, 11:15 PM
Ok guys.....does anybody use movable chord shapes a lot. I find the topic baffling and enjoyable all at once. I mean the basics are straight forward but as you move through all the variations (ie: 6, 7, sus4, 6/9) it makes my head spin. Any thoughts? Did I even ask a question? Excuse me as it is 2 am here.

TokyoUketarist
05-20-2008, 01:40 AM
You just have to understand what notes make up a chord then you can move them wherever you want. Whenever you see a number after a chord that means your adding that scale degree. For example Csus4. Apply 12345678 to CDEFGABC. So sus4 would be F CDEF or 1234. It's really logical and simple once you know where the notes are and how they relate to the scale degrees.

Another simple example a Cmajor chord has the notes CEG or 135.
A Cmaj9 would be adding a D note because if 8 is C then the next note in the scale is D which would be 9. The pattern just repeats.

menehunenyc
05-20-2008, 02:51 AM
As far as moving a chord shape, that is quite simple. For example the B chord, with fingers at 3211 can easily be slid up the fret board, with each freat being a half step. So moving up to 4322 become C chord, up one more time to 5433 becomes the C# chord. As long as you are pressing all 4 strings, you can modulate any chord up or down. I do this alot in my cover of Joy to the world (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jJ-e9YWu2U). Hope this helps!!!

seeso
05-20-2008, 03:37 AM
For the A form barre chord, all you need to know are the notes on the A string. For example, the 5th fret on the A string is a D. We know that simply by going up the chromatic scale from A.

Keeping in mind that there are no sharps or flats between B and C or E and F, we have the following notes going up the A string:

open = A
1st fret = A#/Bb
2nd fret = B
3rd fret = C
4th fret = C#/Db
5th fret = D
6th fret = D#/Eb
7th fret = E
8th fret = F
9th fret = F#/Gb
10th fret = G
11th fret = G#/Ab
12th fret = A

So, we have our A chord: 2100, right? Looking at the fret board, in particular the A string, we can move that shape anywhere up and down the fretboard to make any of the chords listed above.

For example, to make a Bb chord, we can barre our index finger on the first fret, where the Bb note is. We get 3211. Do you see how that chord is just the A chord moved up one fret? To help you see the relation, just imagine that your index finger is the nut.

We can do the same thing anywhere else. To make a D chord, we find the D note on the A string and make the barre chord on that fret - 7655.

To make a C# chord, we have 6544.

Can you tell me how you would make an E chord? Or an F chord?

sheldon
05-20-2008, 04:18 AM
9|8|7|7 & 10|9|8|8...? I'm trying to learn these scales myself...

seeso
05-20-2008, 06:27 AM
9|8|7|7 & 10|9|8|8...? I'm trying to learn these scales myself...

Absolutely correct, my friend.

You only need to know the chromatic scale to move barre chords. The chromatic scale is just all the tones right after the other. The only thing to remember about the chromatic scale is that there are no sharps or flats between B and C or E and F.

What about the D form barre chord? You can move that puppy all up and down the fret board also.

One way to finger a D chord is 2225. Taking a look at what notes those fret numbers refer to we get A D F# D. Since we're playing a D chord, that must mean that the C string or the A string defines these barre chords.

So we can just find the note of the chord we want to play on the C string or the A string and build our barre chord at that fret.

For example, if we wanted to make an F chord using this shape, we find the F on our C string. It's at the 5th fret. So we barre that fret with our index finger and put our pinky on the 8th, giving us 5558.

Alternatively, we could have found the F note on the A string and built our chord that way, pinky first.

Using this shape, what would a G chord be? What would an Eb chord be?

grappler
07-26-2008, 06:46 AM
its soo hard sesso!
i know some of you may think im pretty stupid, since i've been playing some tunes and put it on youtube. But Honestly, i dont know squat with these.
I know basic etc.. but reading what your last post sesso, Im pretty confused.

:(

KamakaTexas
07-30-2008, 08:14 AM
I know basic etc.. but reading what your last post sesso, Im pretty confused.

:(


Ha! You're not alone! :confused:

May I join you in your confusion? :D

grappler
07-30-2008, 04:10 PM
join the crew brother.

salukulady
07-30-2008, 04:38 PM
Absolutely correct, my friend.

You only need to know the chromatic scale to move barre chords. The chromatic scale is just all the tones right after the other. The only thing to remember about the chromatic scale is that there are no sharps or flats between B and C or E and F.

What about the D form barre chord? You can move that puppy all up and down the fret board also.

One way to finger a D chord is 2225. Taking a look at what notes those fret numbers refer to we get A D F# D. Since we're playing a D chord, that must mean that the C string or the A string defines these barre chords.

So we can just find the note of the chord we want to play on the C string or the A string and build our barre chord at that fret.

For example, if we wanted to make an F chord using this shape, we find the F on our C string. It's at the 5th fret. So we barre that fret with our index finger and put our pinky on the 8th, giving us 5558.

Alternatively, we could have found the F note on the A string and built our chord that way, pinky first.

Using this shape, what would a G chord be? What would an Eb chord be?What seeso said.......
what I heard, "blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah..........(I am one ignorant ukulele player.)

salukulady
07-30-2008, 04:45 PM
I know what a chormatic scale is, I'm a flute player. And I understand when I play a Bb on the uke and move it up the fret board it becomes a B, C, Db etc...but why doesn't that work when I move the F chord the same way? Or does it only work when you are holding down all four strings like the Bb? Wait a minute.....did I just figure something out?

david98116
07-30-2008, 07:04 PM
For some shapes (at least major chords) you have to play the 5th on two seperate strings. I'm using fretboard roadmaps by Fred Sokolov and its slowly making sense.

Keonikapila
07-30-2008, 09:00 PM
I know what a chormatic scale is, I'm a flute player. And I understand when I play a Bb on the uke and move it up the fret board it becomes a B, C, Db etc...but why doesn't that work when I move the F chord the same way? Or does it only work when you are holding down all four strings like the Bb? Wait a minute.....did I just figure something out?

You're right about needing to hold down all 4 strings

The F chord does move in the same way, but when you move it down you need to bar the fret above the chord shape

F = 2010
F# = 3121
G = 4232
G# = 5343
A = 6454
...

It's the same with the any "open" chords

G7 = 0212
G#7 = 1323
A7 = 2434
...

C = 0003
C# = 1114
D = 2225
...

A7 = 0100
A#7 = 1211
B7 = 2322
...

...I'm going to assume you get the point and stop with the examples now, hope this helped

salukulady
07-30-2008, 09:24 PM
You're right about needing to hold down all 4 strings

The F chord does move in the same way, but when you move it down you need to bar the fret above the chord shape

F = 2010
F# = 3121
G = 4232
G# = 5343
A = 6454
...

It's the same with the any "open" chords

G7 = 0212
G#7 = 1323
A7 = 2434
...

C = 0003
C# = 1114
D = 2225
...

A7 = 0100
A#7 = 1211
B7 = 2322
...

...I'm going to assume you get the point and stop with the examples now, hope this helpedJust had an "Ah hah" moment. This is so cool! Thank you. You just opened up a section of my brain that now understands a little more theory.

Keonikapila
07-30-2008, 09:50 PM
Just had an "Ah hah" moment. This is so cool! Thank you. You just opened up a section of my brain that now understands a little more theory.

Glad to help! I love those eureka moments that push you up to the next level! :D

Jimmy
08-01-2008, 11:46 AM
My friend tryed to explain this to me one time. He said he was taught the CAGED system. It's something like every fret has 5 chords or something. I didn't really pay attension.

Then we played Twist and Shout as an example but I didn't get it. :P

Bosko and Honey
06-30-2009, 03:04 PM
I read hawaiiankanak's thread "figuring out higher chord version" and then did a search of this board and realised nobody has really gone into the "CAGFD" system.
It's based on the "CAGED" system for guitar, and is a really groovy way to understand how the whole fretboard works...
Yes, the are 5 ways you can play each Major, minor and dominant 7 chord, using the C, A, G, F and D "shapes".
You can then move these shapes chromatically up or down the neck to find ANY other chord in these categories.

That is, if you learn these 15 chord shapes (C,A,G,F and D in Major, minor and 7 forms) you can easily work out ALL Major, minor and 7 chords.

I've atached a fretboard "map" we made plotting how the shapes join on the uke fretboard... the circle with a dot in the centre indicates the "root", in this case "C".

If you want some very detailed explanations, I've put it on our site, under Ukulele Tips (http://ukulele.spots.com.au/index.php?pid=11360).
You have to be a member to see it because we wanted to give our members some kind of benefit!:)
Just click on "become a member" and once you're approved (spam etc) you'll get a confirmation email... then just log in and you'll be able to see the CAGFD lesson.

It really changed our understanding of the way the uke is set up, and we gave away our chord books after that!:D

Bosko

Waterguy
06-30-2009, 04:23 PM
I've never seen it explained any easier then it is on this chord chart. http://www.fleamarketmusic.com/store/Scripts/prodView.asp?idproduct=222
Well worth the 7 bucks. The theory is great as you progress but if you just want to be able to finger all the chords up the neck, this little chart is great. I keep one in my case all the time and can find pretty much any chord I need in seconds.

GrumpyCoyote
06-30-2009, 06:49 PM
I read hawaiiankanak's thread "figuring out higher chord version" and then did a search of this board and realised nobody has really gone into the "CAGFD" system.
It's based on the "CAGED" system for guitar, and is a really groovy way to understand how the whole fretboard works...
Yes, the are 5 ways you can play each Major, minor and dominant 7 chord, using the C, A, G, F and D "shapes".
You can then move these shapes chromatically up or down the neck to find ANY other chord in these categories.

That is, if you learn these 15 chord shapes (C,A,G,F and D in Major, minor and 7 forms) you can easily work out ALL Major, minor and 7 chords.

I've atached a fretboard "map" we made plotting how the shapes join on the uke fretboard... the circle with a dot in the centre indicates the "root", in this case "C".

If you want some very detailed explanations, I've put it on our site, under Ukulele Tips (http://ukulele.spots.com.au/index.php?pid=11360).
You have to be a member to see it because we wanted to give our members some kind of benefit!:)
Just click on "become a member" and once you're approved (spam etc) you'll get a confirmation email... then just log in and you'll be able to see the CAGFD lesson.

It really changed our understanding of the way the uke is set up, and we gave away our chord books after that!:D

Bosko
Wonderful Bosko - thank you very much for that!

Bosko and Honey
06-30-2009, 08:01 PM
Wonderful Bosko - thank you very much for that!
You're more than welcome - glad you got something out of it! I really can't emphasize enough how helpful the system was for us...

Regarding the fingerboard map attachment, keep in mind it plots 5 ways of playing C Major, C minor and C7 chords - using 5 different shapes for each (closed shapes unless in open position).

These SHAPES always go in the order C,A,G,F then D when ascending the neck, but the CHORD is still C.

If you start using an A Chord in open position, the next C up the neck will be using a G shape, then F, D, and back to A etc...

If you start using G Chord, the order of shapes going up the neck will be F, D, C, A, G....

I remember the order by saying "cag-fud"
It means you've always got 5 voicings at your fingertips, and the trick is to learn where the shapes join (where the next one up the neck is, and the next one down).
It's good to practice playing C in open position, then moving up to an A shape, then a G shape, F shape and D shape... until you know exactly where to go automatically.
Then Start with an A chord, moving up the neck...
Then G, F and D...
Do it for the Major, minor and 7 forms, and in no time you'll see the whole fretboard open right up!

uke5417
06-30-2009, 08:17 PM
I kind of backed into barre chords. I forced myself to learn second position chords, and then third position chords, and that was when I came to the realization that the forms can be pushed up and down the fretboard. I keep a copy of this in my wallet: http://ookworld.com/irorbit/img/uke_chord_forms.gif for the odd ones that I can't remember. That and a key chord chart have been my bibles for wrapping my mind around this stuff:
http://www.ezfolk.com/uke/Tutorials/1four5/music-theory/key-chord-chart/3-key-chord-chart.jpg