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View Full Version : Any players that DON'T like Jake Shimabukuro's music?



happyslappysoong
04-06-2010, 01:09 PM
Hi all.

I was just cruising around a bass forum and saw a thread about how so many bass players don't like Jaco Pastorius (he's the jazz Hendrix of bass, for all of you who don't know your bass gods).

And it got me curious...are there any Uke players who actually AREN'T a fan of Jake S' music?

I personally love it, but i'd be curious to see if there are people who dislike it and why.

Have an awesome day! :p

grubblybubbly
04-06-2010, 01:11 PM
jake plays somuch music, between flamenco and blues, It not to like at least one of his peices.

deach
04-06-2010, 01:12 PM
While I appreciate his technical and musical skills, I couldn't listen to more than 2 songs without being bored out of my mind. Instrumentals just aren't my thing.

SailingUke
04-06-2010, 01:57 PM
While I appreciate his technical and musical skills, I couldn't listen to more than 2 songs without being bored out of my mind. Instrumentals just aren't my thing.

Not just Jake. I too like some vocals thrown in the mix.

James Hill has added a significant amount of vocals to his shows.

Gcow55
04-06-2010, 01:57 PM
I'm with Deach. I think he is technically brilliant and incredibly creative. However, aside from a few songs, he just doesn't do it for me. To me, a lot of his music sounds like what you hear in an elevator or dentist's office. Other times, I feel like his music is too "guitarish". Although, let me reiterate that I still think he is an immense talent and has done wonders for the ukulele.

mailman
04-06-2010, 02:02 PM
Like Deach, I certainly appreciate Jake's music, but it's not my style, either. I have three of Jake's CDs on my iPod, amongst others, but recently I find that I'm skipping over his music almost without fail on shuffle play....

scottie
04-06-2010, 02:21 PM
I like Jake's guitaristic approach to the ukulele. I have absolutely no inclination to do anything "traditional" with my ukulele. There are no rules. Jake makes his own rules because he can, which is the prerogative of all musicians. My own personal inclination is to treat it like a banjotarimandolele, which is probably more guitar-like than many traditionalists would want. . .

I'm not giving up the re entrant tuning for anything. :D :D

Chris Tarman
04-06-2010, 02:23 PM
I'm with the others above, mostly. I think he's an amazing player, but a lot of his music isn't to my taste. I like his solo stuff a lot more than the band stuff. The band pieces sound like generic jazz fusion to me, and that has never been a style I can listen to much, no matter who is playing it. He has killer chops though, don't get me wrong. And his youtube video of "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" is pretty much what launched me into this ukulele insanity.

ukulelearp
04-06-2010, 02:30 PM
I'm impressed with his skill. His music isn't what I'd choose to listen to, but it's impressive on a technical level.

haole
04-06-2010, 02:35 PM
His record company/producers/etc. are definitely pushing him in the "easy listening" direction sometimes, but he's a lot more enjoyable to see live. A lot of the energy and feeling is lost on the recordings. I usually can't stand super-technical musicians (especially after seeing a certain boring, pretentious douche whose initials are Y.M.) but Jake's playing has a lot more emotion than your average virtuoso shredder. I dig Jake, but I can understand why some folks are turned off by the musical style.

Melissa82
04-06-2010, 02:43 PM
I love the uke but I don't listen to any uke music.

beeejums
04-06-2010, 02:47 PM
I listen to his live CD with some degree of frequency, but I rarely (if ever) listen to him with a backup band. Whoever made the "elevator music" made me smile... I'm slowly developing an appreciation for Hawaiian music, but it's been hard for me to find Hawaiian music that *doesn't* have an elevator music feel to it.

I realized when listening to his live cd, though, that his songs tend to be a bit formulaic... the melodies are all original, and he uses plenty of interesting techniques and shakes it up that way, but most songs begin with some light picking and move into heavy strumming and then into REALLY heavy strumming... kind of like sex...

Oh wait, I didn't just type that.

(edit)- Also, as a bass player of 11 or 12 years now, I've got to say that I still don't really "get" Jaco. Maybe it's just that he hasn't influenced me the same way that Flea or Victor Wooten has influenced me.

nomis
04-06-2010, 02:54 PM
I think the way Jake Shimabukuro plays is interesting, but he aint no Jaco Pastorius. I mean, Jaco was a God.

http://www.boomerangshop.com/dvdcover/Imagecd58/JacoPastoriusJacoPastoriu223_f.jpg

GVlog
04-06-2010, 03:18 PM
Instrumental. Progressive. Guitarish. Breaks the rules. I like it. I think it pushes the boundaries of what the ukulele can do and changes the way people look at the instrument.

To each their own.

cletus
04-06-2010, 03:21 PM
I have not listened to Jake. I am not interested in the technical approach to music, but I am impressed by the skill.

Raygf
04-06-2010, 03:53 PM
Hi all.

I was just cruising around a bass forum and saw a thread about how so many bass players don't like Jaco Pastorius (he's the jazz Hendrix of bass, for all of you who don't know your bass gods).

And it got me curious...are there any Uke players who actually AREN'T a fan of Jake S' music?

I personally love it, but i'd be curious to see if there are people who dislike it and why.

Have an awesome day! :p

First, my apologies. I know the beginning of my post is off topic for Uke Talk, but here goes.

Jaco is one of 4 bassists in the Down Beat Jazz Hall of Fame. Charles Mingus, Milt Hinton and Ray Brown are the other 3 and Jaco is the only electric bassist.

Miles Davis, Victor Wooten, Pat Metheny, John McLaughlin and Bela Fleck have paid tribute to him in their recordings. Take a few minutes to listen to his work with Joni Mitchell and Pat Metheny to catch a glimpse of sheer brilliance. I'm listening to some right now. Thanks for bringing up the subject. I'm 50 and it's taken me this long to even begin to understand and appreiciate a giant like Jaco Pastorius and I'm not even a bass player.

I purchased Jake's Live recording when it was released and it took quite a few listenings for it to grow on me. I too have trouble listening to more than two or three instrumental tunes on solo ukulele. I actually just put "Live" back in my car a few days ago. Great disc.
Regards,
Ray

Huckleberry
04-06-2010, 04:11 PM
Jake is absolutely the greatest technician of our time. But, as others stated previously, after a while he loses me. I much prefer Brittni Paiva. She's got soul. Her music moves me.

the52blues
04-06-2010, 04:19 PM
I've only been into the uke for a couple of months and I don't listen to a lot of albums preferring to play my own music but my first experience with uke playing that wowed me was James Hill. I kept reading here in UU Jake this, Jake that, Oh jake is great, he's the best etc. So I googled him and gave him a listen. Well...he's pretty good I guess...I still like James Hill much better as a total package entertainer so.....sue me.

Chris Tarman
04-06-2010, 05:42 PM
I've been a bass player for 30 years and I only really listened to Jaco for the first time a few years ago. I don't like all of his stuff, but I REALLY like his stuff with Joni Mitchell. His style is nothing like anything I play (although a jazz/funk band I was in did his version of "Chicken" and I tried to copy his feel at least). But he really busted down the traditional role of bass in the same way Jake has with ukulele. Of course, Jaco wasn't the only bassist to do that. Paul McCartney, John Entwistle, Chris Squire, Jack Bruce, etc etc etc...

vai5500
04-06-2010, 05:52 PM
like mah samoan breh wud say,"DOGG,NO LIE.....HE SUCKS".haha.its a lil too much for my taste bro.hey,then again,u askd me if i liked the guy.haha

My music will go on forever.Maybe its a fool say that, but when me know facts me can say facts. MY MUSIC WILL GO ON FOREVER". -BOB MARLEY

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-06-2010, 05:53 PM
The only thing I don't like about Jake are all the Jake Wannabees that have followed in his footsteps, playing his music lick for lick. Enough already. There's only one Jake, as it should be.

GVlog
04-06-2010, 06:00 PM
The only thing I don't like about Jake are all the Jake Wannabees that have followed in his footsteps, playing his music lick for lick. Enough already. There's only one Jake, as it should be.

All innovation starts with imitation. Once the best of the wannabees have matched his skill, they will probably start doing more interesting things with the instrument.

RyRod
04-06-2010, 06:05 PM
I agree with Mr. Moore. There are a ton of imitators playing his songs note for note. I AM ONE OF THEM for right now. I'm not good enough yet to understand what to add to the songs, what sounds good, all the crazy Gaugmaj7 chords and such. I cannot sing, and I'm not about to try, so I'm stuck with "samey" instrumentals.

However, to stay on topic, Jake is a great inspiration and awesome uke player. I enjoy his music, with or without a backup band. It's hard to get the ukulele to "sing" for you, and I love what he does with it.

seeso
04-06-2010, 06:23 PM
I like his music a lot. I don't listen to it on a regular basis, and I don't try to play like him, but I dig it.

happyslappysoong
04-06-2010, 07:24 PM
Jake is absolutely the greatest technician of our time. But, as others stated previously, after a while he loses me. I much prefer Brittni Paiva. She's got soul. Her music moves me.

I am curious to know, what you think Brittni has on Jake? You mentioned she's got soul, are you discounting the 'soul' factor in Jake's music? But fair enough her music moves you, thats great!

This has been an interesting thread. Prior to this I thought everyone adored Jake's style in his music. This thread is telling me quite the opposite!

Brandon7s
04-06-2010, 07:28 PM
Jake's stuff with a backing band is rather boring, but his solo work is alright. He's not someone I listen to just to enjoy music, but he did change the way I look at the ukulele.

paw123los
04-06-2010, 08:02 PM
I think that Jake for ukulele players is like Segovia was for classical guitar players. He opens eyes for new possibilities and motivates people to try. It was Jake's gently weeps that motivated me to start playing ukulele. I must say I love his music and his passion for the instrument inspires me and I would love to play like him - but propably in the future (hopefully) there will be more ukulele players that will perfect some techniques, invent new, compose new great songs and will push ukulele even higher - just like it happened with classical guitar.

paw123los
04-06-2010, 08:08 PM
Jake is absolutely the greatest technician of our time. But, as others stated previously, after a while he loses me. I much prefer Brittni Paiva. She's got soul. Her music moves me.

I think is just a matter of taste. I like what Brittni do but Jake's music and his on-stage personality makes me want to watch and listen to him much more.

paw123los
04-06-2010, 08:10 PM
All innovation starts with imitation. Once the best of the wannabees have matched his skill, they will probably start doing more interesting things with the instrument.

I totally agree with this !

mds725
04-06-2010, 08:29 PM
This has been an interesting thread. Prior to this I thought everyone adored Jake's style in his music. This thread is telling me quite the opposite!

This is a conclusion based on flawed polling techniques. Your thread heading is "Any players that DON'T like Jake Shimabukuro." (Emphasis in original heading.) Because the heading specifically targets people who might not like Jake, it's more likely to attract more people who don't like him than do. Start a thread with the heading "Who DOES like Jake Shimabukuro" and I bet your "poll" results would be quite different. This is the flaw in political polling. The way you ask the question can skew the answer. For example, a majority of Americans have said in polls they don't like the health care bill that just got enacted in the US, but when Americans are asked about all the individual provisions in the bill, an even larger majority says it likes almost all of them.

Dane
04-06-2010, 10:37 PM
I started uke because of jake. I thought it was always plinky sing along music and shrugged it off, that's not for me. I enjoy a good vocal song, but some things I feel you can't express with words the way you can with a good instrumental. Another thing I like about instrumentals is that they can be interpreted many different ways, and you can imagine many different stories for them, where as vocals are more straight-line to the point for the most part.

Yeah sure there's people that play his songs note for note. I bought an ukulele because of gently weeps, so I learned it. Some people can pick up an instrument and fiddle around with it on their own and figure things out, but most people start out by learning other artists work. This goes for every single instrument. I would learn many of his other songs if I had the tabs, and I should hope that Mr. Shim is flattered by all the people wanting to learn and play his songs. I saw him play in my town recently and he was very entertaining, great stories about his songs, funny, just a cool guy. But I also am always working on creating my own works, they may not be finished, not even close, but I don't strictly learn other peoples work.

I am a fan of jake, I was as excited as a little girl at a jonas brothers concert when I got to meet him. But I would be just as equally excited to me someone like Howlin Hobbit or Craig Robertson, who are not what I would immediately choose to listen to, but I can appreciate their work very much.

happyslappysoong
04-06-2010, 10:42 PM
This is a conclusion based on flawed polling techniques. Your thread heading is "Any players that DON'T like Jake Shimabukuro." (Emphasis in original heading.) Because the heading specifically targets people who might not like Jake, it's more likely to attract more people who don't like him than do. Start a thread with the heading "Who DOES like Jake Shimabukuro" and I bet your "poll" results would be quite different. This is the flaw in political polling. The way you ask the question can skew the answer. For example, a majority of Americans have said in polls they don't like the health care bill that just got enacted in the US, but when Americans are asked about all the individual provisions in the bill, an even larger majority says it likes almost all of them.


Thats a very good point, and I didn't keep that in mind.

luvdat
04-06-2010, 10:51 PM
While I appreciate his technical and musical skills, I couldn't listen to more than 2 songs without being bored out of my mind. Instrumentals just aren't my thing.

Ditto.

I would add a guitarist's name Jim Campilongo for a sense of perspective. One of his "Master of the Telecaster" instrumentals is featured in an insurance ad. For the most part, instrumental guitar (and now ukulele music?) is a dead end and frequently becomes guitar music for guitarists, ukulele music for ukulele players...

The current thread is NOT a poll. Instead it is a question raised within a context of a ukulele forum where a particular artist is often cited as one's inspiration for getting started, a player representative of the current wave etc...and yes, a player who has spawned an overload of wannabes...and yes, a player with a decent amount of interviews...

What is flawed is any comparison to a health care poll, flawed or not flawed. It is not aiming for a statistical conclusion in the first place. It is also arguable that fans of Jake S. would respond to such a question, expressing their more postive sentiments. If the turnout of Jake fans is too slim in this thread, fans can start a "DO you" thread, where they can feel free to express all their admiration...but seriously, why not also here in this thread?

Most music waves emphasize songwriting, vocals, instrument and rhythms. IMO, much of the strength of Jake S. instrumentals depends precisely on known songs with fairly well known lyrics...in short, their recognition factor. Yes, he does have compositions of his own...

Frankly, IMO, chord bashers who write songs and sing do more for the ukulele wave...than ANY virtuoso.

cornfedgroove
04-07-2010, 03:40 AM
If it was live, I could watch and listen all day...as is, I gotta have lyrics to keep me interested.

I hate Miles Davis...apparently he's brilliant, but to me he's just a snoozefest
Give me Louis Armstrong anyday, even Harry Connick Jr

1014
04-07-2010, 05:31 AM
seen him once. and that's enough.

bought a cd, and quickly gave it to my dad, who gave it to his friend's son.

i don't mind instrumental cds, i prefer troy Fernandez's instrumental album over Tf's vocal solo albums and any of jake's.

i guess i'm one of those traditionalists always harping about the boom bip.

csibona
04-07-2010, 06:05 AM
I like his music- but I do not listen to it often. I do not tend to listen to instrumentals - but I do like jazz and I usually don't listen to vocal jazz. So I don't need vocals but I find jazz to be a bit more complex than "instrumental" music.

I think Jake is getting a bit more into jazz (playing at Yoshi's) . His music may change from the jazz influence.

brickerenator
04-07-2010, 06:29 AM
I like Jake a lot. But so far, Zach Condon of Beirut is my favorite ukulele player, and his work isn't even that challenging. It's just so passionate.

Gipserio
04-07-2010, 09:07 AM
I don't need lyrics to keep me interested, but I find Jake's playing much too explicitly focused on technique, or should I say difficulty. I think he is a technical musician showing his ability but not an artist in the true sense.

John King's music has no lyrics and I can listen to his version of Loke Lani (solos and duets for ukulele) for ever. There's a difference.

Coconut Willie
04-07-2010, 09:12 AM
Jake has talent like no other, but my favorite to listen to is IZ! I like the uke playing AND the singing!

molokinirum
04-07-2010, 10:22 AM
Jake is the best, but I prefer to listen to bradda IZ

Dane
04-07-2010, 11:14 AM
but I find Jake's playing much too explicitly focused on technique, or should I say difficulty.

I would have to disagree. Some of his songs are actually quite easy to play, and yes some of his have some more advanced techniques, but not all.

I like this thread a lot, why? Because I just got about 4 or 5 new uke players that I had not heard of previously. Good stuff =)

mds725
04-07-2010, 11:44 AM
The current thread is NOT a poll. Instead it is a question raised within a context of a ukulele forum where a particular artist is often cited as one's inspiration for getting started, a player representative of the current wave etc...and yes, a player who has spawned an overload of wannabes...and yes, a player with a decent amount of interviews...

What is flawed is any comparison to a health care poll, flawed or not flawed. It is not aiming for a statistical conclusion in the first place. It is also arguable that fans of Jake S. would respond to such a question, expressing their more postive sentiments. If the turnout of Jake fans is too slim in this thread, fans can start a "DO you" thread, where they can feel free to express all their admiration...but seriously, why not also here in this thread?


The "poll" comment was just a refernce to the IP's comment that based on the nature of responses to his original question, he was concluding that Jake was not nearly as popular as the IP thought. I don't believe for a minute that this thread is a poll, but the IP was treating the responses as if the thread were a poll by reaching a conclusion about Jake's popularity based only on the posts people were leaving. I was merely pointing out that his conclusion might not be correct.

jontom
04-07-2010, 12:39 PM
Like someone already said before, it's because of Jake that I started to play the uke after being trained as a pianist... a totally different field. "Live" is a great album if you're looking for some background music while at work but definately not something to pump you up.
Beside his tremendous talent I feel his melodies are nice. Just a little too much predictable here and there but there are some phrases really interesting proving he has a deep knowledge of what he's doing.

I would like to hear him in a different contest... maybe with something more distorted or with a "real" band on his back REALLY arranging something and not only supporting Jake skills. I'm sure the whole impact would be different. But maybe this is due to the way they want to promote him... something like "just stay focused on the ukulele golden boy and you're done" which is pretty sad because I think Jake could be absolutely stunning even within a standard line up with a singer.

Thing is that his greatness is all inside the ukulele scene while there's no doubt he could really bring the uke on the outside mainstream.

nomis
04-07-2010, 01:49 PM
I think the issue here may be to do with the style/genre of music which Jake chooses to play. To me he doesn't really seem to be a jazz player (which is fine) but perhaps he is encountering the same problems as other non jazz instrumentalists. IMHO non jazz music just doesn't contain enough harmonic movement or tension & release to sustain the listeners interest for long, or to form a strong basis for improvisation. Given a more static progression, some music can start to sound a little like elevator music. I also don't think that what Jake plays is Fusion (in the Jazz-Fusion sense of the word) fusion players like Pat Metheny, Scott Henderson (and of course JACO PASTORIUS) have created some very challenging pieces. Having said that, I can see his dilemma, uke players seem to be pretty conservative (if not nostalgic) musically, and I'm guessing if he played more avant garde pieces that his audience would be diminished. I think the previously stated preference for Harry Connick Jr (YUCK) over Miles Davis makes this point more eloquently than i ever could.

Personally I'd like to see players like Jake moving in to more challenging (experimental) areas but I guess that will come as uke player start to think of themselves more as musicians and less as just ukulele players. I guess given time they may begin to embrace theory, do a little reading and maybe eventually even get together with musician who play non-uke instruments lol.

I have a great respect for Jakes ability, but you have to admit that this piece wouldn't be out of place in a shopping mall:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZZolcEwzK0

Now if Jake or anyone on uke could do something like this, I'd be listening to it all day:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5-pBkwyUxc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppA9p6Rboqw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDQlSSOXU6A&feature=related

Aaaahhhhhh, such brilliance, such genius - I'm off to do some infinitely inferior playing lol.

RyRod
04-07-2010, 01:53 PM
...I think Jake could be absolutely stunning even within a standard line up with a singer.

I really like the stuff he did during the Pure Heart era. They made/covered a bunch of songs that I like to play along with and listen to everyday.

beeejums
04-07-2010, 03:10 PM
I like this thread a lot, why? Because I just got about 4 or 5 new uke players that I had not heard of previously. Good stuff =)

Ditto.

Pat Matheny, too... All I had really ever paid attention to is that crazy 4,000 stringed guitar he has.

jehicks87
04-07-2010, 03:56 PM
as others have said over and over, I really appreciate his technique. I even like a good number of his instrumentals, mostly his "older" stuff. I like him solo much more.

on the other hand, there are a number of his songs (even some live performances I've heard or seen recordings of) that I can say I absolutely do not like.

All in all, I love his older style... who didn't fall in love with his rendition of "while my guitar"? I haven't met the guy, but I'm sure he's a friendly, approachable cat. I wouldn't mind grabbing a beer with him to see where he's coming from on an off-the-record type bs session. I just personally don't ascribe to the "fan" mentality, never have, and certainly do not now (my cousin is a country singer who has had a #1 hit and a few top ten hits, and the "fan" idea is kind of weird when you see it first hand from the other side of the fence.)

Chris Tarman
04-07-2010, 04:43 PM
I understand that Jake has worked with or at least opened for Bela Fleck and the Flecktones. That would be interesting. Although I feel kind of the same way about The Flecktones. It's unbelievably good playing, but sometimes doesn't seem to be SAYING all that much. Victor Wooten is a scary-good bassist, but really... he makes every other bass player in the world look like a couch potato. It's not fair! lol

Dane
04-07-2010, 06:37 PM
Ditto.

Pat Matheny, too... All I had really ever paid attention to is that crazy 4,000 stringed guitar he has.

Pat is truly amazing, if anyone here has not heard him play you really should check it out, he's very inspiring. Metheny and Mike Kineally are my favorite guitar players, both very different, both extremely talented.

There are some amazing players of guitar and other similar stringed instruments that I wish would pick up a uke from time to time. (wouldn't that be cool)

Chris Tarman
04-07-2010, 06:44 PM
Pat is truly amazing, if anyone here has not heard him play you really should check it out, he's very inspiring. Metheny and Mike Kineally are my favorite guitar players, both very different, both extremely talented.

There are some amazing players of guitar and other similar stringed instruments that I wish would pick up a uke from time to time. (wouldn't that be cool)

I've said this before elsewhere, but I really wish Richard Thompson played uke.

gioconbrio
04-07-2010, 06:48 PM
Now if Jake or anyone on uke could do something like this, I'd be listening to it all day:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5-pBkwyUxc


Well, it does look like he's playing an electric guitalele...

thejumpingflea
04-07-2010, 06:57 PM
Music is what YOU make it to be. Enjoying music is up to the individual.

I love Jake's music. I learned much of his music to become a better player and because of that I have had new doors open to me. Without his music the uke wouldn't be where it is. While My Guitar Gently Weeps may be an overplayed song, but every time I hear it I get a smile on my face. I love playing it and just because someone says I am just another "wannabe Jake player" doesn't make me want to stop.

To me, Jake has redefined (ukulele) music. Call me a fanboy, call me a "Jake imitator" or whatever, but I don't care. His music has inspired me to play the uke, learning his music has made me into a player and now admiring his music is allowing me to work on my own originals, arrangements and recordings. I try to implement many of the things he does into my playing, manipulate it, and turn it into something new.

Granted I can say the same thing about countless musicians. Other ukers such as James Hill, Herb Ohta, Aldrine, etc and of course musicians of all other styles as well such as Pete Townshend, Eric Clapton, Chick Corea, Charlie Parker, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, James Brown, Bach, etc.

To me that is what makes music so great. Listen, learn, play, change.

Kaneohe til the end
04-07-2010, 09:12 PM
honestly i like Jake's slower music, but his faster paced songs are a little too "busy" for me. dont get me wrong, hes definitely revolutionary, and just as if not more well known than Ohta-san himself.
my theory is I think he had gotten to a point musically where traditional playing wasnt cutting it anymore, and so he branched off, tried different things (musically speaking), and when he kinda went back, i think his music becomes better. i would say James hill is in a similar place, playing with chopsticks and what-not.

MisoHappy
04-07-2010, 09:36 PM
Am I the only one that can listen to his music all day long? hahaha

Dane
04-07-2010, 10:19 PM
Am I the only one that can listen to his music all day long? hahaha

If I don't have things on my mind, I can sit and listen to his albums. But if I get too stressed out over things it ruins it for me and I can't listen to it the way I would like to

jontom
04-07-2010, 10:50 PM
I could listen to him all day long playing along with Tommy Emmanuel, one of the greatest acoustic guitar players alive
Check it out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGpQzyUMHSA

nomis
04-08-2010, 05:01 AM
Speaking of potentially influential players, It was this video of Ross Maxwell that made me go out and buy a uke. 'm not saying he has the same chops as Jake, but he sure is musical.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JJaCcqr41YM

Dibblet
04-08-2010, 05:19 AM
I like his music- but I do not listen to it often. I do not tend to listen to instrumentals - but I do like jazz and I usually don't listen to vocal jazz. So I don't need vocals but I find jazz to be a bit more complex than "instrumental" music..

I listen to a lot of jazz but I don't usually listen to vocal music. Vocals are just space fillers between instrumental sections for me. Each to his own I suppose.



I think Jake is getting a bit more into jazz (playing at Yoshi's) . His music may change from the jazz influence.

Good. He has hitherto struck me as a great instrumentalist and fine musician but a bit lacking in direction.

BashfulPuppet
04-08-2010, 05:58 AM
I like to listen to music that tells a story. It doesn't have to have words but it does need to draw me into it and lead me along and move me to feel something. About 20 years ago I was dabbling in magic and illusion and a very talented illusionist told me that just being technically good was not going to make me a good performer. People need a story to either follow or be a part of. Then the technical ability really shines though and doesn't get lost in boredom. The same is true with music. Technical ability does not replace the need for the music to speak to the hearer.

Another point I'd like to add is a survey I read in college that said that people tend to enjoy music most that is familiar to them. If the music is too different they have a harder time really interacting with the music meaningfully. I think this is one reason why innovators often don't have large audiences that follow them in the first years they perform. It takes time for their music to really shape their audience.

These two elements explain in part the popularity for the 'Ukulele Orchestra of Great Brittian and some others that are relying on already known songs for their arrangements. It also explains why "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" is Jakes most popular song.

It takes courage and vision to be an innovator. And I am personally glad for those that have the ability to push music in new directions.

Hobgoblin Steve
04-08-2010, 07:48 AM
His record company/producers/etc. are definitely pushing him in the "easy listening" direction sometimes, but he's a lot more enjoyable to see live. A lot of the energy and feeling is lost on the recordings. I usually can't stand super-technical musicians (especially after seeing a certain boring, pretentious douche whose initials are Y.M.) but Jake's playing has a lot more emotion than your average virtuoso shredder. I dig Jake, but I can understand why some folks are turned off by the musical style.



Oh come on.
I'm not one to say that hes the almighty, but he is pretty damn good. Also having met him, hes really not what people make him out to be. Honestly, I'd say hes about as humble as John Petrucci and JP is probably one of the nicest people in the world.

nomis
04-08-2010, 08:07 AM
Y.M.?
Yehudi Menuhin?
Yngwie Malmstein lol?
Yahoo Messenger?

Dane
04-08-2010, 08:13 AM
Another point I'd like to add is a survey I read in college that said that people tend to enjoy music most that is familiar to them. If the music is too different they have a harder time really interacting with the music meaningfully.

This is very true. I like to think I'm pretty open minded to most kinds of music, and I had an assignment to photograph this musician in studio, and I got his album and listened to it. My first thoughts were "Holy (blank) this guy is friggin weird" And then after a while, I REALLY got into his music, and I couldn't stop listening to it. It's very different, but that was part of the magic for me, and some of his melodies are beautiful. His name is Neal Crosbie, a painter/poet/musician I'm not sure if he has any videos up.

EDIT: This is a video of him, but with no music, sorry =( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H87Dr3oAHPA You can see his guitar and banjo and such in the background around 1:30 haha. He plays banjo, guitar, harmonica, (I might be forgetting something) and ukulele! I took my ohana solid mahogany and let him play it and he was amazed, he had only ever played a cheaper, plinky ukulele, I should get in touch with him and see if he's upgraded yet haha.

Hobgoblin Steve
04-08-2010, 09:30 AM
Y.M.?
Yehudi Menuhin?
Yngwie Malmstein lol?
Yahoo Messenger?


you got it.

pulelehua
04-08-2010, 09:48 AM
In my ukulele club at school, I try to start off each week with a bit of "ukulele inspiration". For whatever reason, I see one of my jobs as getting out the word that the ukulele is a serious instrument, and so with my captive audience, I suppose I feel it best to preach to the proverbial choir. Even though some of them are as young as 12, they've already hopped onto the "uke as kitsch" bandwagon, and see it as the little joke instrument they play on the side.

There's probably no one as effective as Jake Shimabukuro for changing their minds about just what sort of machine they've got in their hands.

MGM
04-08-2010, 10:02 AM
I may be mistaken but asn't the only ukulele solo instrumental ever to hit the tops in Billboards charts is "Song for Anna" by ohta-san

nomis
04-08-2010, 10:18 AM
@pulelehua

No one told me that the Ukulele was a serious instrument. One of the things that attracted me to it most was it's comical nature. Oh well, back to the stylophone I guess:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hc5bPJ4AvLo&feature=related

http://img121.imageshack.us/img121/4339/rolfharrisstylophone.jpg (http://img121.imageshack.us/i/rolfharrisstylophone.jpg/)

gitarwmn
04-08-2010, 02:23 PM
I think Jake is fantastic but it was IZ that got me wanting to play.

happyslappysoong
04-08-2010, 03:47 PM
I understand that Jake has worked with or at least opened for Bela Fleck and the Flecktones. That would be interesting. Although I feel kind of the same way about The Flecktones. It's unbelievably good playing, but sometimes doesn't seem to be SAYING all that much. Victor Wooten is a scary-good bassist, but really... he makes every other bass player in the world look like a couch potato. It's not fair! lol

All interesting and thought provoking discussion.

Anyways, heres a link of a jam with Victor and Jake, if you're keen.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dyqySn1WOQ

eleuke
04-08-2010, 07:26 PM
Victor and Jake on the same stage! I would not have thought it possible that so much talent could fit in the same building! Killer vid. Thanks for posting...

pulelehua
04-09-2010, 04:59 AM
@pulelehua

No one told me that the Ukulele was a serious instrument. One of the things that attracted me to it most was it's comical nature. Oh well, back to the stylophone I guess:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hc5bPJ4AvLo&feature=related

http://img121.imageshack.us/img121/4339/rolfharrisstylophone.jpg (http://img121.imageshack.us/i/rolfharrisstylophone.jpg/)

Wow. That man is the original leg end. Thanks, nomis. But don't let me put you off your comical ukulele playing. As Tom Lehrer once sang: When correctly viewed, everything is lewd. I could tell you things about Peter Pan, or the WIzard of Oz... now THERE'S a dirty old man.

It's paraphrasing, but I think the sentiment is in there somewhere.

nomis
04-09-2010, 05:40 AM
This should probably be in another thread (or another site lol) but is it only a sad old git like me that finds this fascinating?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIZ2Ldrr5ok

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9VymAn8QJNQ

The ROBOTS are coming - we have become obsolete lol

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9DttjXo9Cs&feature=related

scottie
04-09-2010, 05:55 AM
In response to someone's earlier post (can't get the quote function to work) To me the Flecktones are kind of like. . . they call it "Jazz", cause they ain't gots nuttin else to cawl it. . . I think Bela's much more than merely facile. He has a recorded DVD/CD package with (Edgar?) Meyer, a symphony bassist. . . it's pretty darned wild, especially the canon Mr. Meyer wrote. The DVD shows them driving themselves nuts getting it down. Bela Fleck is a frikkin wonderful improviser.

nomis
04-09-2010, 06:36 AM
I've never been a big fan of the Banjo (probably has something to do with Deliverance lol), but then, I hadn't youtubed Bela Fleck until a few moments ago. Awesome...

pulelehua
04-09-2010, 09:17 AM
This should probably be in another thread (or another site lol) but is it only a sad old git like me that finds this fascinating?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIZ2Ldrr5ok

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9VymAn8QJNQ

The ROBOTS are coming - we have become obsolete lol

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9DttjXo9Cs&feature=related

I was really hoping for some stylophone clips. Now need to get my head around what Pat Metheny is doing.

P4ttheb4ker
04-09-2010, 09:40 AM
I really like his music, but now that I think of it, it sounds very lounge-y and elevator-ish. But it's still good nonetheless.

Link
04-09-2010, 09:54 AM
I'm okay with an instrumental treack or two on a normal album. But all isntrumental, not for me. Obviously he is great though, and should be recognized as the best in the world currently.

BadLands Bart
04-09-2010, 10:56 AM
Jake is great, but make mine IZ!!!

Chris Tarman
04-09-2010, 01:00 PM
All interesting and thought provoking discussion.

Anyways, heres a link of a jam with Victor and Jake, if you're keen.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dyqySn1WOQ

Thanks! That is a great video. Although I think it is interesting that Victor Wooten referred to "Yesterday" as a John Lennon song. I know the official credit is "Lennon/McCartney", but I think pretty much everyone recognizes it as almost pure McCartney. Either way, it is not JUST Lennon (not to belittle John Lennon in any way, shape or form!).