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Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-07-2010, 05:22 PM
I lost the hard drive on my computer today and haven't backed up my files as often as I should have. As a result I've lost the majority of my building list for this year. I have been able to reconstruct most of it as best as I can but I am sure there are some that I have missed.
If by chance you are on my building list for this year and you have not heard from me yet could you please email me?
Mahalo, Chuck
moorebettahukuleles@aol.com

smithpaul60
04-07-2010, 05:37 PM
I'm on there, Already paid and everything, yeah..... not really but it was worth a shot.

Ronnie Aloha
04-07-2010, 05:38 PM
Chuck, there are services that will reconstruct your hard drive as much as possible in order to save your data. I'm not sure how much of the information you lost is irreplaceable. Here is a link to one provider after a quick google search"

http://www.diskdatarecovery.net/

cornfedgroove
04-07-2010, 05:55 PM
may wanna sticky this thread to keep it visible until things get sorted

schubs
04-07-2010, 06:28 PM
http://lifehacker.com/170257/macgyver-tip--save-your-hard-drive-in-the-freezer

you can try this. I don't know if it will work though.

dnewton2
04-08-2010, 01:19 AM
Bummer Chuck. Hope everything gets sorted out ok. I am not on you list but wish I was (even though I have one of you ukes).

Skitzic
04-08-2010, 02:24 AM
Data recovery is very expensive, and it really depends how the hard drive failed if anything can be saved.

The freezer trick has worked for me in the past. Make sure you leave the side off when you put the drive back in though, and it only worked about 5 mins the first time and 15 the second (the second time I turned the computer on in my shed when it was 30 outside.

Good luck

sukie
04-08-2010, 03:02 AM
I'm on there, Already paid and everything, yeah..... not really but it was worth a shot.

DANG!!! Beat me to it.

Good luck sorting things out. For your customers' sakes, hope it all works out.

As an aside: Chuck, did you know that some pink flamingoes are really orange? Do they make orange inlay? How about coral? wink-wink.

mwaller
04-08-2010, 11:44 AM
Really sorry to hear that, Chuck. I hope you're able to recover or reconstruct your data quickly!
Best wishes,
Mika

pithaya9
04-08-2010, 03:40 PM
Data recovery is very expensive, and it really depends how the hard drive failed if anything can be saved.

The freezer trick has worked for me in the past. Make sure you leave the side off when you put the drive back in though, and it only worked about 5 mins the first time and 15 the second (the second time I turned the computer on in my shed when it was 30 outside.

Good luck
I have tried the freezer trick also and it worked for about 10 mins. Just be sure to have another drive in place and formatted before you turn the power back on.

BashfulPuppet
04-08-2010, 04:38 PM
If you have a big enough freezer try running the computer in the freezer with the monitor and key board on the outside. It might give you the time you need to get the info you want.

gotrice415510
04-08-2010, 04:55 PM
it seems that he said he literally lost his hard drive... like physically not data wise. good luck on gettin everything sorted out!

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-08-2010, 05:32 PM
Thanks all for your advice and concern.
Working and living off-grid poses a whole different set of problems that those with "real" electricity have a hard time believing. Even though I am supposed to be generating power with a true sine wave there are lots off "dirty" things happening and using the generator occasionally also causes trouble. It's all bad news for sensitive electronics like computers. I've gotten pretty used to the situation, this being the third computer I've lost in the last seven years. But it's not all bad news. Although I lost the majority of my building list, all of my inlay art and ukulele building data should be on my portable data storage. I'll find out when my new Macbook Pro comes tomorrow. I need a break anyway.
The real good news is that while clearing room in the freezer (didn't work BTW) I discovered a brand new quart of Baskin Robbins pralines and cream ice cream I'd forgotten about. That's the silver lining they talk about that's behind every gray cloud.

eleuke
04-08-2010, 06:07 PM
Aloha Chuck,

Sorry I didn't check in earlier. Besides being a mediocre uke strummer, I am an IT professional and have been for 25 years. I'm just over here on the other side of the island. "Data recovery is my thing, baby"... If there is anything recoverable from your system. I can get it for you. Probably in about as much time as it would take you to eat the ice cream. Send me an IM...

smithpaul60
04-08-2010, 06:26 PM
nice find. Eleuke while you're talking to Mr. Moore get him to buy a UPS (uninterruptable Power supply = basically a big battery) to smooth over the "not so pure sine waves" The right brand will smooth out any electronic issues.

BTW, I've often thought it would be cool to go "off grid". Has it worked for you? Was it a huge change?

Skitzic
04-09-2010, 03:04 AM
nice find. Eleuke while you're talking to Mr. Moore get him to buy a UPS (uninterruptable Power supply = basically a big battery) to smooth over the "not so pure sine waves" The right brand will smooth out any electronic issues.

BTW, I've often thought it would be cool to go "off grid". Has it worked for you? Was it a huge change?

Ditto. You can get a decent UPS for <$100. It will save you a lot of trouble in the end...

Also, as an IT professional I feel the need to say: this is why it is really, really important to back up your data. Especially in a situation where power spikes have killed multiple systems.

Just saying...:deadhorse:

cornfedgroove
04-09-2010, 03:52 AM
my buddy's a digital forensic nerd...I dont know what kind of time he has but he's got all kinds of fancy gov't equipment to do just exactly what you're talking about. He works in an secluded, unmarked and unadvertised keycoded section of a larger public building....sssh. So if you get really stuck, and no other options pan out for you, he can do it for you. He's a music lover

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-09-2010, 05:18 AM
I thought having laptops would eliminate any power supply issues, being that they run on DC. The problems could also be the environment in which I keep my computer. Macs are pretty well sealed against such things but I'm dealing with salt air and quite a bit of wood dust.

spots
04-09-2010, 05:52 AM
Chuck,

Wow!

A little off topic but...

How are you generating your power, and how many watts and amps does your setup produce on average?

smithpaul60
04-09-2010, 06:15 AM
MR. Moore, Both Laptops and Desktops have a built in "power supply" that regulates the flow(desktops = inside, laptops = on the power cord), however they are far from perfect and actually quite fragile to electrical surges, as you well know by now. The UPS will fix this. Basically it stores an amount of energy and releases it at a given rate, smoothly and without the spikes.

How they will help is one: smoothing over spikes, and two if the power goes out you have a certain amount of energy stored up that is still being released so that you can save your data and shut off the computer to avoid any loss in data. For example the one at my work allow the computers to run for 45 minutes with no power.

As for the wood dust, a small dirt devil to the air vents on a regular basis should be enough, If you use mac's or laptop then you can't open them, but if you use a desktop PC then you can open the case and get some of the dust from inside the box.

As for the salt water, I don't know.

E-Lo Roberts
04-09-2010, 06:35 AM
Working and living off-grid poses a whole different set of problems that those with "real" electricity have a hard time believing. Even though I am supposed to be generating power with a true sine wave there are lots off "dirty" things happening and using the generator occasionally also causes trouble.

Chuck, had you though about a power conditioner? http://www.amazon.com/b?ie=UTF8&node=11975661
They regulate your power output to prevent the surges and brown outs. It go between your power source and the devices, i.e. computers, etc. They are standard fair on the professional music venue... Just a thought. PS. Good choice buying the Mac... ernie..

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-09-2010, 06:48 AM
Well then Smithpaul, you've convinced me that a UPS is necessary. Thanks for the tip. I regularly start my generator to top off the batteries before I shut down the shop. I think the switching over from power sources has something to do with my computer failures. I know I fry a lot of power adapters to various small appliances and tools. Perhaps this will help.

Spots: With two Outback inverters and controllers along with 16 batteries and 40 photovolteic panels, I am able to generate about 3200 watts at peak. It's enough to power both my shop and home as well as an air conditioner and dehumidifier in my building room. Everything works well during the day when it is bright outside. At night I need to be careful since my power usage is limited to what I have stored in the batteries. It's one of the prices I pay to live in one of the most beautiful, remote places in the world. Collecting and heating water is another story.................

PaulGeo
04-09-2010, 08:06 AM
I've had great success using this free software: http://www.pcinspector.de/

Good luck.

eleuke
04-09-2010, 03:17 PM
SmithPaul's advice is good and E-Lo's is better. With a UPS, (which is a misnomer as 99% of all products marketed as UPS's are really battery backups and not true UPS's) when power is detected, they simply pass that power along to whatever you have plugged in. If it's dirty power going in to the UPS, it's dirty power coming out. Only when power is NOT detected does the circuitry switch over to providing power from the battery and most UPS's don't come anywhere close to providing a clean sine wave when operating on battery anyway. A power conditioner, on the other hand, is always working to clean whatever power is coming in to it... If I were in your position, I'd be shopping for a power conditioner with built in battery backup. More expensive than either unit alone, yes, but you will stop frying your electronics and appliance/small tool transformers. If that's not in the budget, then go for a power conditioner over a UPS.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-09-2010, 04:09 PM
SmithPaul's advice is good and E-Lo's is better. ....... go for a power conditioner over a UPS.

OK, I'll take your word. Any recommendations? Given the link that E-Lo posted (Mahalo E-Lo) there seem to be dozens to choose from. I'd need something that consumes minimal power.

eleuke
04-09-2010, 04:57 PM
http://www.apc.com/products/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=LE1200

Your soon to be arriving MacBook Pro will consume 4.6 amps. The above unit is max 10 amps so that leaves you some room for a few small power (<5000ma total) transformers for small tools, etc. If your need for conditioned power is greater than 10 amps there are other options. You could start looking at some solutions from Leviton, etc. Power consumption by the unit itself is minimal.

smithpaul60
04-09-2010, 05:42 PM
Mr. Moore, I was going to say that given your products and their quality to take eleuke's and e-lo's advice, but then i scrolled down and you did. I didn't even know what a power conditioner is. so I'll leave it in the more capable hands. I'm just glad i learned something. especially since i want to go "off grid" one day.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-09-2010, 05:45 PM
Thanks, that's helpful. Forty five bucks (Amazon) is cheap protection.

(or I could just move!)

sukie
04-09-2010, 05:57 PM
Thanks, that's helpful. Forty five bucks (Amazon) is cheap protection.

(or I could just move!)

Move? Are you nuts? Best as I can tell you are living the right life. I'm hopeful your computer problems will be over. Isn't UU the greatest? There are so many knowlegeable and helpful people.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-10-2010, 07:43 AM
Move? Are you nuts? Best as I can tell you are living the right life.

I know it seems that way at first glance but reality is often harsher than it seems. Going green is a good idea but until we put more money into research, it's still pretty inefficient in a lot of ways. It's also pretty expensive. I spend about $5,000 a year on electric costs when you take into consideration equipment maintenence, generator expenses and battery replacement. Initial start up costs were close to $40,000. I admit however, that my power demand is pretty high when you consider that I'm operating a full blown wood shop as well as running the house on solar. I also spend about 15 to 20 hours a week maintaining all of my green systems. We are out of normal cell phone and Internet range (don't even talk to me about satellite!) and I have a series of small radio towers to accomodate these services. Rain water is collected through three gutter catchment systems and heated by passive solar. Drinking water is hauled in. We go to town to buy propane and pick up the mail as neither is delivered here.
I'm not complaining, I'm just warning that, as Kermit the frog sings, "It's not easy being green". I am optimistic that this will all change rapidly in the next few years as more efficient battery research is being done and the Chinese are making excellent affordable solar panels.

smithpaul60
04-10-2010, 12:28 PM
that sounds great to me, when can i come visit? I have always wants my own little getaway.