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View Full Version : Here's a little fretboard note chart that might help =)



Dane
04-09-2010, 10:06 PM
I was trying to find a chart with the notes and such so that I could print it and put it on my wall, but all of the ones I found were vertical, and I wanted it oriented to how I see my instrument! So I made my own, and this one has 19 frets! (I play a tenor with 19 frets) And this is for C-Tuning. I hope this helps some of you

I apologize to whoever I stole all the colors for the notes from and such, I hope you take no offense, I just 'improved' it a little bit =)

http://img15.imageshack.us/img15/484/ukefretboardcopy.jpg



I used part of one of the images of the uke from this URL : http://www.acousticvibesmusic.com/catalog/index.php?cPath=170_171

And the image which I stole the colors from is from this URL : http://www.nutthouse.com.au/ukulele/chords.html

Dane
11-04-2010, 04:03 PM
I recently printed this out in small form and taped it to the backside of my uke body, which has been really helpful in my creative process.

Fuzzy
11-05-2010, 04:50 AM
Thanks for this.

BeachDog
12-02-2010, 06:46 AM
I've been reading the uke music in my 365 Daily Ukulele and I'm wondering about the notes that fall below the staff lines. Immediately below are C and D which are on the third string (the C string) but the notes below those are the B and A which when written up higher on the paper refer to the B and A on the first (or A) string. This holds true for the D and C as well. So here's my question. The B and A that are below the lines are played where on the fretboard? Did I mention that I'm new to reading music and have been teaching myself how to play this way? BTW, this visual is really nice. Thanks for posting it.

KamakOzzie
12-02-2010, 07:11 AM
Beachdog,
the B, A (and G) would apply to using a low G string. They would sound an octave higher on a uke with high G.

Bill

BeachDog
12-02-2010, 07:19 AM
Beachdog,
the B, A (and G) would apply to using a low G string. They would sound an octave higher on a uke with high G.

Bill

So, in the high G tuning (which is what I believe I have) the B on the G string (4th fret) would sound the same as the B on the A string (2nd fret). Correct? If so, will the sound integrity of the piece be compromised or is it going to sound okay being an octave higher?

janeray1940
12-02-2010, 07:29 AM
So, in the high G tuning (which is what I believe I have) the B on the G string (4th fret) would sound the same as the B on the A string (2nd fret). Correct? If so, will the sound integrity of the piece be compromised or is it going to sound okay being an octave higher?

Correct - the lowest note on a high-G tuned uke is the open C string (which is tuned to middle C, the C that falls below the staff line). So any pieces that are written with notes lower than that would need to be played on a low-G tuned uke to get the right notes.

Pueo
12-02-2010, 07:33 AM
Mahalo Dane!

BeachDog
12-02-2010, 07:33 AM
Correct - the lowest note on a high-G tuned uke is the open C string (which is tuned to middle C, the C that falls below the staff line). So any pieces that are written with notes lower than that would need to be played on a low-G tuned uke to get the right notes.

Hmmmm, food for thought...and a good reason for UAS! :D Thanks for the info!

Dane
12-02-2010, 09:13 AM
whenever I look at sheet music, I think of a Piano. I think of the notes in the lines as middle C area, below the lines I think of the next octave of notes to my left (lower notes) and any notes above the lines I think of the next octave to my right (higher notes)

I hope I'm correct, but this is often when making arrangements for ukulele can be difficult, and many converted ukulele songs will move up the fretboard quite a bit. You might ask questions like this to Dominator, or Ken Middleton, both of them do a lot of arrangement making.