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View Full Version : Whew. Un-clenched after 3 days



Steve vanPelt
04-19-2010, 02:43 PM
Never thought one little end graft could give me such fits. Been working on it for three days. *breathing again* It was one of the hardest woodworking tasks I have ever done, 'ukulele or otherwise. I don't think I can even work anymore today. And to think some folks do this sort of thing every day. :worship::bowdown: Wow, heaps of respect for all you daily purflers. Sheesh that was intense. Thanks for looking

Steve





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fahrner
04-19-2010, 02:50 PM
Wow!. The end graft looks great. The whole body is looking awesome.

cornfedgroove
04-19-2010, 03:02 PM
you said "unclenched", I thought for sure you had been sick with some diarrhea lol

Steiner
04-19-2010, 03:14 PM
That rosette is awesome.

Janko
04-19-2010, 03:27 PM
Wow, heaps of respect for all you daily purflers. Sheesh that was intense. Thanks for looking

Steve


Thanks for the warning. And ya like you said, "heaps of respect".
Can I ask if it was just that one or are they all intense? ...just want to know so I can avoid it in the future.

It's small but adds so much. Looks great.

Darrel
04-19-2010, 03:42 PM
Outstanding! Let's see a close up of that rosette please.

Doug
04-19-2010, 04:06 PM
It sure turned out good.

Vic D
04-19-2010, 04:23 PM
Love it. That's a mighty pro looking uke!

Philstix
04-19-2010, 04:30 PM
Awesome job. Love the rosette too.

Vic D
04-19-2010, 06:03 PM
Had to take a peek at it again, the wood, rosette, binding and all is just outstanding.

Flyfish57
04-19-2010, 06:06 PM
Wow! Fantastic job--Love the rosette as well!

lefty dan
04-19-2010, 07:09 PM
That looks great. I dont think you give yourself enough credit. You really do some nice work.
Dan

Steve vanPelt
04-19-2010, 10:24 PM
Hey thanks everybody for the nice comments. You should see the pile of oops.


Thanks for the warning. And ya like you said, "heaps of respect".
Can I ask if it was just that one or are they all intense? ...just want to know so I can avoid it in the future.

It's small but adds so much. Looks great.

Janko, that really was the most intense, so far. Bright lights, magnification and tweezers...not used to working so small. Don't go avoiding anything just because it about kicked my butt, that's a long list.

Here's a pic of the rosette

12098

erich@muttcrew.net
04-19-2010, 11:47 PM
Wow Steve, that really does look fantastic. The whole package - wood, binding, end graft, rosette... - looks really professional. I hope we achieve your level some day.

SweetWaterBlue
04-20-2010, 12:52 AM
That really looks great. The patience paid off big time.

Matt Clara
04-20-2010, 02:31 AM
Looks great, and I'm sure you'll get more efficient at it the longer you stay at it.

bluesuke
04-20-2010, 03:41 AM
Hey thanks everybody for the nice comments. You should see the pile of oops.



Janko, that really was the most intense, so far. Bright lights, magnification and tweezers...not used to working so small. Don't go avoiding anything just because it about kicked my butt, that's a long list.

Here's a pic of the rosette

12098 I know what Your saying I"m beginning to get a pile myself . Thats looking really good

dave g
04-20-2010, 04:47 AM
Beautiful!

One of these days I've gotta try doing some inlay...

Matt Clara
04-20-2010, 05:51 AM
Beautiful!

One of these days I've gotta try doing some inlay...

Nonsense--you keep me in good company. Not that you can say the same... ;)

ksquine
04-20-2010, 07:40 AM
Sweet. It was definitely worth the effort!!

wheelgunner
04-20-2010, 09:08 AM
That looks amazing! I don't know that I'll ever manage the patience for something like that.

Pete Howlett
04-20-2010, 10:26 AM
Great work - stopped doing this when my eyes started to fail me.

Dominator
04-20-2010, 04:51 PM
That looks great. I dont think you give yourself enough credit. You really do some nice work.
Dan

I agree. Excellent work. Mind giving us a little blow by blow of how you went about the rosette? Very unique.

thomas
04-20-2010, 06:05 PM
I really like that rosette, and they arent somthing that usually turn me on.

Great work. On the end graft too.

Take care,
Thomas

Kekani
04-20-2010, 06:13 PM
Nice job - that's how you do an end graft with mitred purflings. Did you use the Richard Hoover (SCGC) method of mirroring the back of the chisel?

-Aaron

Steve vanPelt
04-20-2010, 07:44 PM
Nice job - that's how you do an end graft with mitred purflings. Did you use the Richard Hoover (SCGC) method of mirroring the back of the chisel?

-Aaron

Thanks, Aaron. Haven't heard of that method before, it sounds like a great idea now that you mention it. I just kind of eyed it...a little more angle...a little less, after a while I got a feel for it and it was easier. The hardest part was getting the chisel cuts square so when I scraped back to flush there wasn't a gap in the miter.

Dominator, sadly I have to admit that I have yet to come up with anything truly original. Got the idea for the end graft at http://www.moorebettahukes.com/GALLERY.html and for the rosette at http://www.esomogyi.com/models.html.

To make the rosette I made a jig to fit the dremel round base. Then I used a protractor to draw 8 lines 45 degrees apart. Lined up the jig and routed out the shape. I hand shaped the little pieces of curly on the spindle sander and glued them in. Went back with the dremel to route the purfling channel, cut up lots of little purfling pieces and got 'em in the holes. I sealed the top with shellac first, and used CA to glue it. That's about it.

And Pete, I just started wearing my first pair of glasses a couple weeks ago. Everything square looks like a trapezoid. Guess you could say I began this when my eyes started failing me. Great timing...oh well....

All you guy's nice comments put a smile on my face, thanks!

Steve

12109

Kekani
04-20-2010, 11:00 PM
Thanks, Aaron. Haven't heard of that method before, it sounds like a great idea now that you mention it. I just kind of eyed it...a little more angle...a little less, after a while I got a feel for it and it was easier.

You won't find it on his site (I think), but Frank Ford has it under his field trips section - look for SCGC.

Aaron

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-21-2010, 09:57 AM
I just got my new computer up and running so I can see what's been going on here during the last week.
WOW, that's an awesome job Steve. The rosette turned out super, a lot more work than I'd want to go for! Nice little captive jig, very similar you what I use for my end grafts. Kekani is talking about using the reflective surface from your chisel blade to line up the correct angle. I'm too lazy to keep chisels sharp (don't even own one) so I do the same thing with 1/2" wide X-acto chisel blades (buy them by the 100 from www.widgetsupply.com). Even so, you still need to keep your cuts straight. What you see sometimes on the surface reveals heart aches when you sand flush. I really dislike this kind of work, especially on cutaways where there's a lot more going on.
Great job! Must be the jelly beans.

Steve vanPelt
04-21-2010, 10:37 AM
...... a lot more work than I'd want to go for!


Oh, Chuck, you expect me to believe that after seeing something like this...12111

That's my all time favorite rosette.
I often go to your gallery for inspiration, the problem is that your work is so smooth it doesn't properly convey the difficulty of achieving success. I think, that looks cool, I'll do that, followed by weeks of hair pulling and adding to the pile of oops. Now I'm thinking a bound headstock and fingerboard looks cool. There goes May and June. Oh well...

Thanks for the link and the kind words. Gonna try epoxy for the first time on this one, which you have said ain't for the faint of heart. Don't think you've ever mention end grafting and it almost did me in. Should be an interesting rest of the week.

Vic D
04-21-2010, 10:41 AM
I just got my new computer up and running so I can see what's been going on here during the last week.
WOW, that's an awesome job Steve. The rosette turned out super, a lot more work than I'd want to go for! Nice little captive jig, very similar you what I use for my end grafts. Kekani is talking about using the reflective surface from your chisel blade to line up the correct angle. I'm too lazy to keep chisels sharp (don't even own one) so I do the same thing with 1/2" wide X-acto chisel blades (buy them by the 100 from www.widgetsupply.com). Even so, you still need to keep your cuts straight. What you see sometimes on the surface reveals heart aches when you sand flush. I really dislike this kind of work, especially on cutaways where there's a lot more going on.
Great job! Must be the jelly beans.

I was wondering just yesterday if I was being totally amatuerish by using X-acto chisels instead of the pos stanley I bought, and then the master posts that he uses them exclusively. I've stopped tucking my braces uder the lining but when I did, the exacto chisel allowed me to get the fit perfect. I use them for cleaning up the ends of braces still and spots where scrapers won't go but now I'll pick up the 1/2. I've been using the stanley to trim braces but alas the stanley is now dull and I don't want to invest in sharpening crap... and I really don't want to spend time sharpening. The thing is, I do want to build a few finger planes, but then I'll have to sharpen them won't I? Whatever I decide, the X-acto tools will always be in my arsenal.
Thanks for the link (great prices) Chuck, and the eye candy.

Vic D
04-21-2010, 10:45 AM
Oh, Chuck, you expect me to believe that after seeing something like this...12111

That's my all time favorite rosette.
I often go to your gallery for inspiration, the problem is that your work is so smooth it doesn't properly convey the difficulty of achieving success. I think, that looks cool, I'll do that, followed by weeks of hair pulling and adding to the pile of oops. Now I'm thinking a bound headstock and fingerboard looks cool. There goes May and June. Oh well...

Thanks for the link and the kind words. Gonna try epoxy for the first time on this one, which you have said ain't for the faint of heart. Don't think you've ever mention end grafting and it almost did me in. Should be an interesting rest of the week.

My favorite is the koi, but the headstock on the one you posted there is another of my favorites. Inspirational about sums it up.

Flyfish57
04-21-2010, 10:46 AM
Oh, Chuck, you expect me to believe that after seeing something like this...12111
Gonna try epoxy for the first time on this one, which you have said ain't for the faint of heart. Don't think you've ever mention end grafting and it almost did me in. Should be an interesting rest of the week.

Good luck Steve--We're all counting on you!!

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-21-2010, 11:16 AM
I was wondering just yesterday if I was being totally amatuerish by using X-acto chisels

Yes you are. And so am I. I get so much static from some of the pro builders about my techniques that I quit sharing them. Just recently at a builder's meeting I let on that I use wire cutters (end nippers really) to cut all my binding and purfling material, even shell strips. I can still hear the guffaws!
You do need a nice assortment of chisels though, if only for display purposes. Otherwise people won't take you credibly.
BTW, I too yearn for a set of Ibex finger planes. I just can't make the commitment to keep them sharpened.
OK, now I'll wait for Pete.........

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-21-2010, 11:21 AM
Oh, Chuck, you expect me to believe that after seeing something like this...12111

That's my all time favorite rosette.
I often go to your gallery for inspiration, the problem is that your work is so smooth it doesn't properly convey the difficulty of achieving success. I think, that looks cool, I'll do that, followed by weeks of hair pulling and adding to the pile of oops. .

The way those things work is that I stay awake for a couple of months of nights, working out all the problems and detail, followed by weeks of hair pulling and adding to the pile of oops. I haven't found any (or many) shortcuts to the PITA that it is. It's just work. If it's easy it's a sure bet you're doing something wrong.
The final result seems to be worth it though.
You are definitely on your way to bigger things. Good for you.

Flyfish57
04-21-2010, 11:25 AM
Yes you are. And so am I. I get so much static from some of the pro builders about my techniques that I quit sharing them. Just recently at a builder's meeting I let on that I use wire cutters (end nippers really) to cut all my binding and purfling material, even shell strips. I can still hear the guffaws!
You do need a nice assortment of chisels though, if only for display purposes. Otherwise people won't take you credibly.

I guess you're still ok here as long as you're not using your wire cutters as a hammer!! Either way, I'm glad you're back in cyber-world!!

Vic D
04-21-2010, 11:31 AM
Yes you are. And so am I. I get so much static from some of the pro builders about my techniques that I quit sharing them. Just recently at a builder's meeting I let on that I use wire cutters (end nippers really) to cut all my binding and purfling material, even shell strips. I can still hear the guffaws!
You do need a nice assortment of chisels though, if only for display purposes. Otherwise people won't take you credibly.

OMG! End nippers to cut binding.. now I've got chills. I was snapping off some binding with my end nippers yesterday and the shop door was open, I had to glance out the door to make sure nobody saw me.