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japzylog
05-13-2010, 06:59 AM
I think I don't want to play guitar anymore because I'm finding ukulele is better for me. I have been playing guitar for how many years now and not getting any better, although I can play some hard songs (if I read their tabs or chords). I'm not good in figuring what notes to use when it come in guitar especially when finding notes on the E and A strings (bass strings). I just started playing ukulele more than a week now but I figured how to play almost the complete part of Fallin' Slowly from the movie Once and Time After Time (lets say 80% of it). But in guitar, no way could do that! I got a feeling inside me that maybe ukulele is the right instrument for me :)

Anybody has the same situation as mine?

lozarkman
05-13-2010, 07:10 AM
Yeah japzylog, I have the same feeling. I have played piano for over 60 years (quite well) and guitar for about 12 ( so so) but I also find that my mind wraps around the 4 string uke much better also. I think it is somewhat attributable to 4 over 6 strings to navigate, simpler chord patterns, little wider string frets, and just easier physically to handle, pick up and a go to instrument than my guitar and piano. (Very difficult to carry my piano to my front porch to play). So yes dude, go with what feels good to you and you really enjoy. I find it hard to leave my tenor alone. I enjoy it immensely. Happy strumming and picking! Lozark

japzylog
05-13-2010, 07:16 AM
Yeah japzylog, I have the same feeling. I have played piano for over 60 years (quite well) and guitar for about 12 ( so so) but I also find that my mind wraps around the 4 string uke much better also. I think it is somewhat attributable to 4 over 6 strings to navigate, simpler chord patterns, little wider string frets, and just easier physically to handle, pick up and a go to instrument than my guitar and piano. (Very difficult to carry my piano to my front porch to play). So yes dude, go with what feels good to you and you really enjoy. I find it hard to leave my tenor alone. I enjoy it immensely. Happy strumming and picking! Lozark

My wife is even jealous on my tenor now! LOL:rotfl:

ashleychantel
05-13-2010, 07:54 AM
I can understand if you want uke to be your main instrument, but I wouldn't give up the guitar forever.. if you don't use it you lose it! LOL but seriously, I would practice guitar every now and then so you don't forget what you already know..

japzylog
05-13-2010, 07:57 AM
I can understand if you want uke to be your main instrument, but I wouldn't give up the guitar forever.. if you don't use it you lose it! LOL but seriously, I would practice guitar every now and then so you don't forget what you already know..

I'm just a frustrated guitar player... :wallbash:

dnewton2
05-13-2010, 08:03 AM
I was actually toying with the idea of getting a small guitar (like a baby taylor) to play around with. I had a guitar a long time ago but never really played it. Been playin uke for more then 2 year now, and thought guitar might be fun to play around with.

Skitzic
05-13-2010, 08:07 AM
I still crank my guitar out, but I figure I need to keep them around in case I ever do start another band. That, and sometimes you just need a guitar. I love playing Staind covers, and some of them just don't sound right on a uke.

ashleychantel
05-13-2010, 08:13 AM
I'm just a frustrated guitar player... :wallbash:

haha I can totally understand that. sometimes is seems like I just hit a wall and don't progress for a while but thanks to youtube that hasn't happened for a while. they have a lot of good tutorials for everything you can think of

Keef
05-13-2010, 08:22 AM
whats a guitar? :)

arashi_nero
05-13-2010, 08:26 AM
personally, i've never played guitar. so, i can't say i know what i'm missing. however, i've never had a desire to learn guitar. all my friends play guitar and i felt it was too cliche. plus, too many strings for my brain (but then again my bassoon has 12 or 13 thumb keys lol). maybe one day i'll try learning the guitar. i'm sure if you've learned it, might as well keep it up at least a little for good measure. you never know when you'll need to play it.

Mim
05-13-2010, 09:02 AM
I played guitar for a long time now, but not well. My fingers are short and stubby. I was pretty decent with classical stuff as long as it did not require a long finger spread. But the Uke seems to "make more sense" to me. And it is portable. And makes people smile!!! I would still pick up your guitar every now and then, but do what makes you happy and feel successful in music. Like you, guitar made me have the bang head agaist wall feeling!

luvdat
05-13-2010, 09:19 AM
Played guitar for most of my life and grateful that I did and frankly without a snese of frustration. The fact that I play ukulele pretty much exclusively now...yeah I stated my manifesto but no need to declare your allegiance or publically renounce the guitar(though if you want, why not?) The point is: do what makes you happy and where you can express yourself and have fun. And I say this to you (and to myself) without any disrespect: nobody else really cares...whether you play guitar or ukulele. Walk that one around. When you can get beyond the "insulting" reality of that, you'll feel truly free...

But just in case this approach doesn't work for you, feel free to borrow this phrase: "Another jerk with a Strat." The ukulele will probably never be as popular, but at least you'll have a lot of time to get some mileage out of it...

UncleElvis
05-13-2010, 09:46 AM
I tell you... I feel the same way.
I've been taking lessons on and off for 25 years, both serious ones and friends going "Here's how you...".
I've ALWAYS been frustrated with the guitar.

The ukulele, though?

LOVE it.

Even though I still suck at it, there's no "I want to throw this thing through the window" frustration.

Just "GAH! Why won't my fingers hold these bloody strings down right?" frustration.

clayton56
05-13-2010, 10:44 AM
and guitar is probably #1 out there for carpal tunnel syndrome. It can be very useful and I'm not quitting altogether but it's ukes more and more.

Portability, sweeter sound, easier on the wrist, gotta love the ukulele.

pulelehua
05-13-2010, 11:00 AM
20 years of guitar playing. Less than 1 on the ukulele. My Martin D-18 comes out for the occasional guitar lesson. That's it. I brought my Les Paul to work (I'm a music teacher) to improve storage at home. I've played it at school once. My Kala Acacia Concert is out all the time, home and at school.

Part of me thinks it's a bit tragic. Financially. In terms of enjoying the craftsmanship of my instruments. But the ukulele feels much more like home. And I'm pretty good at guitar. I wondered for about 4 months if it was a phase, as my phases tend to last about 3 months. This is no phase.

Just a shame I can't afford a KoAloha longneck soprano. With a pickup. That's my current dream. No UAS. Just one good, professional ukulele.

Pippin
05-13-2010, 12:08 PM
A lot of people find that playing ukulele improves their guitar playing, too.

luvdat
05-13-2010, 12:14 PM
20 years of guitar playing. Less than 1 on the ukulele. My Martin D-18 comes out for the occasional guitar lesson. That's it. I brought my Les Paul to work (I'm a music teacher) to improve storage at home. I've played it at school once. My Kala Acacia Concert is out all the time, home and at school.

Part of me thinks it's a bit tragic. Financially. In terms of enjoying the craftsmanship of my instruments. But the ukulele feels much more like home. And I'm pretty good at guitar. I wondered for about 4 months if it was a phase, as my phases tend to last about 3 months. This is no phase.

Just a shame I can't afford a KoAloha longneck soprano. With a pickup. That's my current dream. No UAS. Just one good, professional ukulele.

Yes, mate...this is no phase for myself and for not a few of us here...

If you really want to test yourself, though I believe you like sopranos and concerts (I'm big on sopranos myself but that's not my point) pick up a baritone (just bought a Makala baritone and slapped on some D'Addario baritones with wound D and G). Even on this the most "guitarish" of ukuleles the ukulele soul shines through (at least for me). It's a subtle experience going back and forth between identities like something out of Proust...it will be the soul of ukulele playing that flickers in and out...beyond simply the tonal...

luvdat
05-13-2010, 12:15 PM
A lot of people find that playing ukulele improves their guitar playing, too.

I can see why. Too few guitarists really have a connection with rhythm. They think they do...

ukecantdothat
05-13-2010, 02:28 PM
I play more uke than guitar lately. And by "lately" I mean the last 3 yrs or so. I don't ever want to give up playing guitar by any means, though. Like if I suddenly discovered I like sushi, I wouldn't give up fish and chips. There's so much you can do on a uke that just can't be done on guitar and vice versa. It's an apples / oranges thing. They really are two different beasts. Don't give up one for the other, rather allow one to inform the other, like Pippin intimated. I don't think guitarists are by nature "less rhythmic" than ukers. I understand the sarcasm, but tell that to the Al DiMeolas of the world. Trust me - the world is chock full of people who suck on every imaginable instrument, and the world is rife with those who inspire and excel at every instrument.

luvdat
05-13-2010, 03:07 PM
I play more uke than guitar lately. And by "lately" I mean the last 3 yrs or so. I don't ever want to give up playing guitar by any means, though. Like if I suddenly discovered I like sushi, I wouldn't give up fish and chips. There's so much you can do on a uke that just can't be done on guitar and vice versa. It's an apples / oranges thing. They really are two different beasts. Don't give up one for the other, rather allow one to inform the other, like Pippin intimated. I don't think guitarists are by nature "less rhythmic" than ukers. I understand the sarcasm, but tell that to the Al DiMeolas of the world. Trust me - the world is chock full of people who suck on every imaginable instrument, and the world is rife with those who inspire and excel at every instrument.

I should have distinguished between "guitarists" and "guitar players." BTW, I think the greatest challenge for both is rhythm, tempo, phrasing...

There is only one Al DiMeola. The rest are imitators and wannabes. The most distinguishing aspect of either guitar or uke playing is one's sense of rhythm and timing (not the socalled less distinguishing, less meaningful "lead" aspect.) This is true for Hendrix anyone, Django Reinhardt...

I think in fairness to the OP my own aside simply related to Pippin's comment that for some that uke might improve their guitar. My own perspective simply that the uke might afford certain individuals a chance to work on rhythm better esp with right hand...

Apologies to the OP and anyone else for making this less fun...

Chris Tarman
05-13-2010, 03:43 PM
I started on guitar (for about 3 weeks!) before switching to bass in 9th or 10th grade because none of my friends played it. As I learned to play bass, I kept working a LITTLE bit on guitar. In college, I sold my bass gear (because I was short on money) and played acoustic guitar pretty much exclusively for about 6 or 7 years (although I was never that good at it and always really considered myself a "Bass-player without a bass"). I started up on bass again about 15 years ago and now almost never touch my guitar (maybe 20 times in the last 15 years, for only a few minutes at a time). I started playing ukulele about a year and a half ago. I still consider myself primarily a bassist, but after 30 years I don't really practice it much. I play bass in two bands, but unless I am practicing or gigging with a band, I almost never touch my basses. I come home from work and pick up a uke. I don't put it down for an hour. I pick it up again after walking the dogs and making dinner and I don't put it down until my wife goes to bed. Not EVERY day, but MOST days. I haven't had this much fun playing any instrument since I first started on bass. I'm not really ready to play uke in front of an audience (apart from the one song in one band where I start on uke and switch to bass mid-song), but I sure have fun on my own! I think that I am to the point where I would progress faster if I was playing WITH someone, and one of my friends who is a really good guitarist said he'd love to get together with me on my uke. So when time permits, I hope to do that soon.

AC Baltimore
05-13-2010, 03:52 PM
My pops always told me "where you spend your time is where you shine". I spent my time on guitars and that in fact is where I shined. But I always tinkered with other instruments. I guess I am being long winded in saying you can focus mostly on one instrument while enjoying others as well.

ukecantdothat
05-13-2010, 04:09 PM
I should have distinguished between "guitarists" and "guitar players." BTW, I think the greatest challenge for both is rhythm, tempo, phrasing...

There is only one Al DiMeola. The rest are imitators and wannabes. The most distinguishing aspect of either guitar or uke playing is one's sense of rhythm and timing (not the socalled less distinguishing, less meaningful "lead" aspect.) This is true for Hendrix anyone, Django Reinhardt...

2-shay!!! :nana:

Pippin
05-13-2010, 09:40 PM
I can see why. Too few guitarists really have a connection with rhythm. They think they do...

You really hit the nail on the head there. I have always been a rock-solid rhythm guitarist and have lots of friends in the music biz because of it.

luvdat
05-13-2010, 09:57 PM
I've said this at least 4 times on this forum in various ways, and not with a sense of sarcasm, but even with a sense of self-critcism. Ask bass players their opinions of guitarists they have worked with. The whole "lead guitarist" notion... yeah the "correct" answer these days is to do away with these distinctions, but frequently for those who parrot the correct response, there is still an overvalued sense of "doing the notes." But the rhythmic context really defines everything...and distinguishes one's playing. It certainly distinguishes choir directors in a Russian Orthodox Church...

Someone like John Lee Hooker who from a technical standpoint could "hardly play guitar" managed to do OK for himself. That's why I also said a ways back that a lot of ukers would do better to learn maybe 5-7 chords (I originally said 3, LOL) and just mess with rhythms for 6 months to a year...

I'm doing a great job keeping this thread fun, LOL...

I'll add another ridiculous analogy. Most uke or guitar players think they need to master martial arts when what they need is 3-4 moves for the street on self-defense...then get the heck out of there.

Deets
05-14-2010, 12:41 AM
The point is: do what makes you happy and where you can express yourself and have fun.

This!

Personally, I love playing guitar. Even though I go through the usual frustrations of it, I'd never let it go. When I picked up the uke, I found that playing it helped me become a better guitarist and vice versa, so I play both pretty much equally now.

ichadwick
05-14-2010, 01:12 AM
I think I don't want to play guitar anymore because I'm finding ukulele is better for me.
Played guitar since the early 1960s. Gave it up when the first uke arrived. Both guitars I had left are on cosignment in the local music shop...

japzylog
05-14-2010, 04:13 AM
My frustration started when I realized that I can't figure out what chords to use in certain songs without reading its chords/tabs. My friends who are guitarist always picks on me whenever I play a guitar because they know that I can only play what I am playing by getting the chords from ultimate-guitar.com or song books. Unlike them, they only listen to what they want to play few times and they already know what chords to use...

Craig Robertson
05-14-2010, 04:49 AM
haha I can totally understand that. sometimes is seems like I just hit a wall and don't progress for a while

That is called a "plateau effect" in learning an instrument. You seem to stay in the same place for a while until the muscle memory settles into place. Then, all of a sudden, you get dramatically better. Learning is a series of plateaus, not an even, measured climb.

I play a lot of different instruments, they all have their sonic landscape. They are all useful to varying degrees. I only write songs on the ukulele or guitar because of the ease of chording and rhythm that is achieved on those instruments. I like both. Sometimes there's nothing like the sound a guitar can make, sometimes it's the ukulele. I also play a lot of bass, but not on stage any more.
All instruments add to your enjoyment of music. The more you play, the better you get at each one.

FrankBungle
05-14-2010, 05:41 AM
it's something that is happening also to me. i started to play guitar about 5 years ago and i am decent at it, not very good, but not bad either. i discovered the potential of the uke only about a year ago and i almost never picked up the guitar again since then.
i don't wanna quit playing guitar, but now that i don't even have a band i just don't feel like playing it.

ps it's almost a month since i last played the uke because of my RSI, or that's what the doctors say i have because they can't find out what my problem is...well i can't wait to play it again!

Ukuleleblues
05-14-2010, 08:13 AM
I was actually toying with the idea of getting a small guitar (like a baby taylor) to play around with. I had a guitar a long time ago but never really played it. Been playin uke for more then 2 year now, and thought guitar might be fun to play around with.
I bought a 1/2 size guitar for rmy wife for $99 It's an Osca Schmidt. It's just a little bigger than a Baritone. I ended ended up tuning it up 1 whole step to from EADGBE to F# B E A C F#. Here is a video of it (with EADGBE tuning) It's fun to pley and easy to carry but the narow neck with 6 strings can take a little to get used to. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfUCl_KrfUYhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfUCl_KrfUY

pulelehua
05-14-2010, 10:05 AM
Yes, mate...this is no phase for myself and for not a few of us here...

If you really want to test yourself, though I believe you like sopranos and concerts (I'm big on sopranos myself but that's not my point) pick up a baritone (just bought a Makala baritone and slapped on some D'Addario baritones with wound D and G). Even on this the most "guitarish" of ukuleles the ukulele soul shines through (at least for me). It's a subtle experience going back and forth between identities like something out of Proust...it will be the soul of ukulele playing that flickers in and out...beyond simply the tonal...

It just so happens that when I was younger and more naive about ukuleles (about 7 months ago), I bought a baritone for the school ukulele club. So, I have had a bash a few times on it. The thing that doesn't grab me is the tuning. I am just enthralled with re-entrant tuning.

How it changes the way scales lay on the fretboard.
How it changes the inversion and voicing of chords you thought you knew.
How upstrums and downstrums no longer relate in the same way.
How it allows you to do very unguitarlike pedal notes and open voicings.
How it totally changes the role of your thumb.

To me, that's the main thing which changes the game. The entire map has to be redrawn.

Pippin
05-14-2010, 10:41 AM
That is called a "plateau effect" in learning an instrument. You seem to stay in the same place for a while until the muscle memory settles into place. Then, all of a sudden, you get dramatically better. Learning is a series of plateaus, not an even, measured climb.

I play a lot of different instruments, they all have their sonic landscape. They are all useful to varying degrees. I only write songs on the ukulele or guitar because of the ease of chording and rhythm that is achieved on those instruments. I like both. Sometimes there's nothing like the sound a guitar can make, sometimes it's the ukulele. I also play a lot of bass, but not on stage any more.
All instruments add to your enjoyment of music. The more you play, the better you get at each one.

I really enjoyed hearing you play slide, Craig. I enjoyed your recordings featuring guitar and ukulele, too. When you make it out here again (Columbus), I'd love to hear your impressions of the Parkwood grand auditorium I now have. It's great for blues and jazz tunes.

luvdat
05-14-2010, 11:53 AM
It just so happens that when I was younger and more naive about ukuleles (about 7 months ago), I bought a baritone for the school ukulele club. So, I have had a bash a few times on it. The thing that doesn't grab me is the tuning. I am just enthralled with re-entrant tuning.

How it changes the way scales lay on the fretboard.
How it changes the inversion and voicing of chords you thought you knew.
How upstrums and downstrums no longer relate in the same way.
How it allows you to do very unguitarlike pedal notes and open voicings.
How it totally changes the role of your thumb.

To me, that's the main thing which changes the game. The entire map has to be redrawn.

Hey, believe me I'm with you on that (all the above, except the soprano AND the baritone both grab me).

My point was simply this: that even with the imposed guitar tuning (same intervals of course) the right hand especially can relate to this undersized 2/3 of a guitar like an oversized soprano, esp. with the index finger (above the sound hole on the fretboard), really light on the wound D with thumb, and finger rolls, chunking etc, less string resistance (proportionate to a soprano for the size of the instrument)...in short, one can get at the ukulele soul of this instrument beyond tonality, tuning.

Yeah, there is nothing like the reentrant. But even with sopranos, is it ONLY about the reentrant? I think it might be just as simple as being able to get a nice response with less resistance, less expenditure of energy (compared to actual guitar playing) I'm ripping off a post of jkevinwolfe here...and then there's the string spacing. BTW, I see too many vids of baritone playing where playing them like guitars makes them sound like a mess...Hey kids, get a Takamine and bang that thing instead!!! Or a flamenco!!! Or an Ibanez electric!!!

In some ways, the right hand feel of playing a baritone has more in common for me with playing a soprano. The right hand feel of playing a tenor actually has less in common at least for me. Blame it on the string tension?

Regardless, isn't it great to fall in love again...with music. And not with some other woman, and then ruin our lives.

Chris Tarman
05-14-2010, 04:15 PM
It just so happens that when I was younger and more naive about ukuleles (about 7 months ago), I bought a baritone for the school ukulele club. So, I have had a bash a few times on it. The thing that doesn't grab me is the tuning. I am just enthralled with re-entrant tuning.

How it changes the way scales lay on the fretboard.
How it changes the inversion and voicing of chords you thought you knew.
How upstrums and downstrums no longer relate in the same way.
How it allows you to do very unguitarlike pedal notes and open voicings.
How it totally changes the role of your thumb.

To me, that's the main thing which changes the game. The entire map has to be redrawn.

I got a set of unwound Aquila baritone strings with a high D and they sound GREAT on my Maccaferri Islander Plastic Baritone.

luvdat
05-14-2010, 04:19 PM
High D was recommended to me just the other day.

Got done playing my bari for an hour and when I went back to the Flea soprano, I felt like Superman, LOL...

japzylog
08-04-2010, 04:41 AM
yehhheyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy, i bought my first solid electric ukulele! visit this site to check the store --> http://www.jupitercreekmusic.com/

haole
08-04-2010, 04:54 AM
I've been playing guitar for about 12 years now, but I stopped getting better about 8 years ago. I've been playing uke about 75% of the time lately. But when I do pick up the guitar, I've noticed that my fingerpicking is a LOT better than it was. I also tend to strum the guitar like a uke now, and every single technique in Aldrine's Uke Minutes applies to the guitar too. I don't think I even attempted to play 5- or 10-finger rolls on a guitar until I learned them on the uke. So if anything, focusing on the uke for so long has actually led me to more interesting places on the guitar.

Don't give up the guitar altogether! Learn some advanced uke technique, and then grab a guitar again. It's amazing how much your approach to the instrument can change.

Right now a big problem for me is that the house is FILLED with guitars, because at one point me and my parents all went through advanced stages of GAS. It sucks having a big pile of cases in every closet, and I still tend to reach for my Makala dolphin about a hundred times more often as I feel like playing my Les Paul. I definitely want to keep a few guitars around, but UAS is a lot less destructive than GAS and I think I'd get more use out of another uke than a guitar.

SweetWaterBlue
08-04-2010, 04:59 AM
Wow. I envy people that can play the guitar well. I wish I had never given it up. I putzed around with guitar in my high school years, but never really learned to play it beyond strumming a few chords. I gave it up for 4 or 5 decades, and now playing the uke has drawn me back to it, when nothing else but the beautiful bass or the high ringing sound of steel stings of a guitar will do for a song. My baritone gets me closer, but sometimes only a guitar will do, as Pippin said.

I don't worry much about what people think anymore, so I don't really care about the guitar being cliche, or the uke being a small club etc. I don't even care much about whether my instruments look like koa or pine, although I do appreciate the beauty of a fine wood. To me now, its more about the music, and each one has its advantages and special place. Its one of the advantages of getting older.

I do understand the time constraints we all have and also the idea of concentrating on one instrument, but once you learn an instrument, its much easier to keep your hand in with minimal practice. I will also say that I much prefer playing my baritone to playing my guitar because it is just so much easier without those extra two strings.

dave alexander
08-04-2010, 06:02 AM
All great answers -- but I fall into the non-musician part of UU. I can strum a bit, sing a bit, and consider it all a huge benefit to my mental health. I don't practice as much as I should -- that would seem like work. Picking up uke at 40-something, I really don't figure I'll be technically excellent on the instrument. But can I entertain? Actually, I entertain myself daily and others occasionally.

Uke is the best mental health release I have all day. If I had to choose an instrument to not get great on, the uke would be it!

(And UAS is far less expensive than GAS.)

greyghost
10-23-2010, 05:31 AM
Yet another guy in the same situation. I've been playing guitar and bass off and on for almost 35 years, and in my 3 weeks of ukulele ownership so far I feel like I've bonded with the instrument in a way I never did with the guitar. I'm keeping (some of) my guitars, but all I've played is ukulele since I got it. I started with a cheap Rogue baritone--Kala tenor here I come!

bobby b
10-23-2010, 05:49 AM
I kinda felt the same way too.
I started playing Uke in June of this year, i have been playing guitar now for 33yrs.
My love for the uke is very strong and I have barely put it down since getting it.
I picked up my acoustic guitar a few times recently and it felt 'foreign'. It just so felt heavy and bulky after playing my little tenor uke.
I started to think about my first year learning/playing guitar and how exciting it was as I improved. I kinda had that same 'obsession' with guitars that I now have with ukes.
I took out my Gibson Les Paul, that I have not played now for, ohhh about 6-7 months. I put on some new strings and cleaned it up a bit, just a little TLC. I plugged it in and played around for a bit.
Well about 4 hours later I had 'renewed my vows'......lol, so to speak. I still love my guitar(s)!!
Now I am playing both uke and guitar equally. I have put way too much time into guitar to just give it up.
I say, keep your guitar and enjoy both instruments.

pulelehua
10-23-2010, 09:24 AM
Just to say (weeks later - but this resurrected itself), I don't think re-entrant tuning is the ONLY difference between a ukulele and a guitar. It's just for me the most demanding in terms of my technical skill. The tone, feel, size, projection, frequency response - all of that is sort of taking care of itself, but I need to spend serious time learning and thinking through the implications of re-entrant tuning in order to get the ukulele to speak with its own voice. I notice some people just sort of ignore the G string except for chords, and end up playing a 3-string guitar tuned up a 4th (in terms of melodic playing). It just seems a shame to not investigate that avenue to its full.

stevecarrero
10-23-2010, 12:19 PM
I think I don't want to play guitar anymore because I'm finding ukulele is better for me. Anybody has the same situation as mine?

I just found this thread today. And, just this past week I've come to the very same conclusion. Nice and happy to know that it's just not me.

Pippin
10-23-2010, 08:35 PM
I'm just a frustrated guitar player... :wallbash:

Ah, but there are lots of ukulele players that find, in time, their guitar playing improves due to their involvement with ukulele. Ashley is right. Don't give it up completely, come back to it later and you will discover some pleasant surprises.

mm stan
10-23-2010, 08:39 PM
Ah, but there are lots of ukulele players that find, in time, their guitar playing improves due to their involvement with ukulele. Ashley is right. Don't give it up completely, come back to it later and you will discover some pleasant surprises.
That's actually quite true, there's a lot of techniques that can be transferred over to guitar...you'd be suprised....and the other way around...

countrybumpkin
10-23-2010, 10:40 PM
Been taking uke lessons over the past year or so with the occasional interruption due to work. An friend of mine in his late 60's just started to pick up guitar a few months ago and perked my interest. Was visiting my brother when he gave me his Seagull folk guitar. I've played piano on and off over 25 years and have found that playing the uke has improved my piano playing. I think that they are all complementary.

LoMa
10-24-2010, 04:28 PM
I am a lousy guitar player. I stink at the uke.

But I love playing 'em anyway...

bobby b
10-24-2010, 07:25 PM
I enjoy playing both the ukes and guitars,................ try playin' one of these :eek::eek::eek:.......http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7Eeeh1IqVE&feature=related

ricdoug
10-24-2010, 07:56 PM
Ah, but there are lots of ukulele players that find, in time, their guitar playing improves due to their involvement with ukulele. Ashley is right. Don't give it up completely, come back to it later and you will discover some pleasant surprises.

I play guitar almost twice as much as my ukes. However; I perform almost exclusively on the ukulele. Playing the uke definately improves my guitar technique. Ric

Fuzzy
10-25-2010, 05:14 AM
All great answers -- but I fall into the non-musician part of UU. I can strum a bit, sing a bit, and consider it all a huge benefit to my mental health. I don't practice as much as I should -- that would seem like work. Picking up uke at 40-something, I really don't figure I'll be technically excellent on the instrument. But can I entertain? Actually, I entertain myself daily and others occasionally.

Uke is the best mental health release I have all day. If I had to choose an instrument to not get great on, the uke would be it!
This is exactly true for me, as well; the uke is good for my mental health, and I enjoy messing around with my soprano. I've tried guitar, but it just seems too much like work instead of fun.

scottie
10-25-2010, 07:05 PM
Guitarist for 30+ years, ukuzoid for about a year. Love 'em both and not giving up either. It's all about MUSIC and doing something we love.

I will say, as a fingerstylist who writes primarily on the guitar I'm still trying to find a place for the uke in the context of my body of work. While it's true that the uke is very much analogous to the guitar it's becoming increasingly obvious to me that a uke is a much different instrument than a guitar in much the same way that a cello is a much different instrument than the violin.