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VixDee
05-22-2010, 07:13 PM
Aloha everyone,

I was just wondering if anyone out there has ever had regrets or second thoughts about selling one of their ukes.

I have been agonizing about selling my Kanile'a Super Soprano. She was my first true uke love. I played her lovingly for six months and then I found that I had fallen for another - a Kanile'a (Lanikai label) Super Concert. It was truly love at first strum - I haven't put her down in months. I also haven't touched my super soprano in as many months. So, today I took her out and played a few tunes and - eh - it just doesn't do it for me anymore. I have been swayed by the bigger sound of the tenor.

I still love the super soprano, I guess just because she was my first. But is that good reason to keep her? Shouldn't she belong to someone who truly enjoys her sound and can appreciate everything about her? I hate to see her case up on the shelf and know that she won't get any serious play time in my house. But, will I ever go back to loving the soprano sound? And what about in the meantime? What should I do?

What do you think? Sell or keep?

Mahalo

itsme
05-22-2010, 07:22 PM
Do you really need the money? If not, I'd say keep it. You never know when you might want to get back into it. Or lend it to a friend or whatever.

Teek
05-22-2010, 09:52 PM
Yeah, I'm sorry I swapped a Pono PKT1 koa tenor for a Kanile'a deluxe koa tenor. Once I got the right strings on the Pono (after I ordered the K) there wasn't a huge difference, except for $450. more. And the Kanile'a is a lot prettier. However the Kanile'a may need different strings as well.

On your soprano, I went off my sopranos for a long time, but I'm back into them now. They make for a nice change. If it's still on the shelf in another 6 months, sell it or Deach it to someone who is eager to play.

VixDee
05-23-2010, 02:39 AM
Thanks for the replies.

To answer, no I don't NEED the money but I could USE it of course. I've been itching for a nice fluke. But that could always come later.

Maybe wait and see. I still don't know. But thanks.

SailQwest
05-23-2010, 03:07 AM
I don't regret selling any ukuleles. But I didn't LOVE any of the ones we sold.

I have two that I seldom play, but I do love them, so I keep them despite having very limited storage space.

If money and storage are not an issue, I think you should hang onto your super soprano.

harpdog
05-23-2010, 03:27 AM
The ones I regretted selling:
Ukebrand (Island Style) concert in mahogany - more "pop" than any uke I've ever played
Aloha Royal (cheap) soprano, mahog - it just made me play and play more
Ohana Vita - sweetest player ever
Kepasa Concert and Boat Paddle Tenor - but they went to support a charity
A natural Flea with rosewood board and K & K pickup - so cozy
older Applause (Korean) UAE20 - they are just NOT the same anymore.

So, yes, regrets abound. Keep the sweet ones.

uke552
05-23-2010, 04:29 AM
I have sold / traded a few with one regret...my Flea. It was my first real uke and I sold it in the vast search of a better one. I have got some "keepers" now but still miss the Flea.

guitharsis
05-23-2010, 05:15 AM
In the past 11 months, I've owned 11 ukuleles. Experimented with the first ones for size mostly. Bought a KoAloha concert and noticed a BIG difference in sound. Presently have 2 KoAlohas, 1 Kamaka and 2 KoAlanas. Don't miss any of the six I sold, traded or gave away because they were inexpensive and for trial. I'm very happy with the ones I have now.

Do miss a Gibson A 1915 mandolin and a Ciani vintage bowlback mandolin. They cannot be replaced.

If you still love your Kanile-a Super Soprano and you don't need the money, I would say keep it. You may miss it if you sell it.

bazmaz
05-24-2010, 12:14 AM
I regret selling my Bruko ( http://gotaukulele.blogspot.com/2009/11/my-latest-acquistion-handmade-solid.html ), but needed the cash. Plus, I know that it went to a good home, and I can replace with a new one for not too many clams.

Still, wish it was here now - would like to play it!

ichadwick
05-24-2010, 01:32 AM
I was just wondering if anyone out there has ever had regrets or second thoughts about selling one of their ukes.
I weep daily for every uke I've sold, traded or given away. It's like watching your children leave home. So sad...

But then I beam with pleasure over the new ukes that have replaced them and, being fickle, stop crying and get to playing.

buddhuu
05-24-2010, 01:39 AM
I totally regret selling most of the instruments I ever sold!

I really miss the Kala tenor I used to have. It went to a fine UU member, and I can't think of anyone I'd rather hear play it, but I did love that uke. I still miss it, but finances made it a necessary sacrifice.

IMHO, if you need to sell then sell. If you don't need to, and you have any doubts, then don't sell.

phanzo
05-24-2010, 06:19 AM
I'd say that if you have your sights set on something else, and you know that someone out there will love you SS just as much as you do, then let it go. I personally suck with those decisions and would probably keep it until I really NEED the money, but that's just me.

I've been in the situation where I was dying to have someone's uke that they didnt play anymore, but they were too scared to sell, so I know there's people out there, itching for your SS. I also know that when I got my Kala Travel Tenor, I didnt pull out my Mainland concert for a matter of months. I have just recently started pulling it out again and falling in love with it's mellow sound, which contrasts the sprucetop of the tenor so well.

So the decision is your. If you have you eyes on another prize and feel like you can find a loving home for someone who will PLAY it, let it go. If you feel like you will never forgive yourself if you let it go and want to play it someday, then hold on to it for a while. There will always be buyers out there, but once it's gone, it's gone...

Good luck!

hoosierhiver
05-24-2010, 07:44 AM
I gave away my Tangi pineapple to a friend last year for helping me out. I saw it yesterday and it looked more beautiful than I remember. He's a much better musician than me, so I don't regret it.

GX9901
05-24-2010, 10:28 AM
If there's something else you want to get with the money from selling the Kanile'a SS, then you should sell it. Otherwise, might as well keep it until you have something in mind that you need funds for. I think just about every uke I've sold was used to fund something else.

scottie
05-24-2010, 01:55 PM
I have a guitar that I won't play anymore, the neck's too skinny. I hung onto it, tho' and I've lent it to a student of mine, who likes it a lot.

haole
05-24-2010, 01:57 PM
Haven't sold any ukes yet, but when I splurged on a Maui Music six-string last week, I came very close to selling my KoAloha tenor in order to fund it. That probably would've been a mistake. So I'm trying to sell a 100-watt Marshall amp instead.

Mim
05-24-2010, 02:16 PM
I have issues... I don't know if I can ever part with one of my ukes. But I only have 2 so... maybe I have not gotten to that point yet.

Anyway, it reminds me of what I have been thinking of this last week. I love love love my Eleuke Soprano Mohogany 100 series. The design is amazing. But it is the older model and my shop is full of the newer model Eleukes and I am wanting to keep a Jazz or Koa... BUT... I think can not part with it! Then the pickup seemed to stop working, so I was even thinking about replacing it's guts because I almost feel guilty about getting rid of it. Luckily, it was the battery! And the crazy thing, I was not the one to think about it (I have been a bit busy and so a bit brain dead I suppose) I was worrying about it to my husband and he said, "Well, I licked the battery the other day and it did not shock me, so I think you just need to replace the battery!" Which I found humorous because he never has anything to do with my ukuleles and here is he telling me he is licking my battery... weirdo... :)! I mean he supports me in selling them and loves to hear me play. He just does not play. He apparently was going to plug it in and crank it up for someone just to show it off, and he was the one to trouble shoot my problem (which is quite obvious I suppose, I just did not have the time to even think about it, I noticed it during a comparison I was doing for someone in passing).

I digress... I think parting can be sweet sorrow if it is going to someone who will love it and it is because you are buying something that suits your taste better. If not though, I would keep it. You may come around to wanting to play it again.

phanzo
05-24-2010, 02:20 PM
Haven't sold any ukes yet, but when I splurged on a Maui Music six-string last week, I came very close to selling my KoAloha tenor in order to fund it. That probably would've been a mistake. So I'm trying to sell a 100-watt Marshall amp instead.

good call!! screw the amp, keep the koaloha!!

VixDee
05-24-2010, 03:19 PM
I only have two ukes also. I don't want to have more than two at a time. I feel too guilty not having the time to play them.

At this point I exclusively play the Kanilea super concert (Lanikai label). I'm super careful with it and always keep it in it's case so I thought a Fluke would be fun to leave around the house and grab it anytime. So if I sold the super soprano, I could use the funds for the Fluke. But at the same time how do you make sure that the uke you sell is going to a good home?

Thanks for all the input. Still haven't decided.

haolejohn
05-24-2010, 03:59 PM
I only have two ukes also. I don't want to have more than two at a time. I feel too guilty not having the time to play them.

At this point I exclusively play the Kanilea super concert (Lanikai label). I'm super careful with it and always keep it in it's case so I thought a Fluke would be fun to leave around the house and grab it anytime. So if I sold the super soprano, I could use the funds for the Fluke. But at the same time how do you make sure that the uke you sell is going to a good home?

Thanks for all the input. Still haven't decided.

I have sold a few and only regretted letting two (mele koa top tenor and mele 6 string tenor) go. I am trying to decide if I need to sell one or three right now. I could use the money bit it won't fix my finances. I think I'm keeping all.

How do you make sure it goes to a good home? You interview the buyers through email and phone conversations.

clayton56
05-24-2010, 08:35 PM
I haven't sold any ukes yet, but in general, once I sell an instrument, I don't miss it. Strange I know.

Keep your supersoprano though - you might want to take it on a trip if it's a little smaller than your concert.

Also, you may get into recording, there might be times when the sound from the smaller body works better, such as a strumming part, where a more trebly sound might be cleaner.

BTW, of almost every necessity, I have two, in case one is down for repairs or something.

70sSanO
05-25-2010, 10:15 AM
I just sold my first ukulele a few weeks ago to fund an new one. The ukulele I sold was a KoAloha soprano. Technically I didn't have to sell it, but since I have been playing a tenor, I just didn't play the soprano anymore.

I listed it on craigslist and got a lot of responses. The first person was a young man who was taking ukulele lessons on an inexpensive concert and felt the concert was too large. When he saw the KoAloha, he was so jazzed.

We have texted each other since then and he is so happy with the soprano, and has gotten a number of compliments, no suprise there, in class. He says he plays everyday.

Do I regret it... well I'm sure I could have gotten more for it, and it would have been nice to say I have one, but the joy it has brought someone is worth more than it ever could just sitting in the case.

John

VixDee
05-25-2010, 11:24 AM
, but the joy it has brought someone is worth more than it ever could just sitting in the case.

John[/QUOTE]

Thanks John,

I think this is where my guilt comes from. I think I'd rather have someone truly enjoy it and play it than have it sit in its case just because I may want to strum it now and again.

Thanks for the perspective!

Joyful Uke
04-02-2019, 12:48 PM
Reviving this very old thread, since I'm trying to talk myself into selling a ukulele, but wonder if I'll regret it.

I've sold some already, and don't regret those. I went through various sizes and necks, trying to decide what works for me. Selling the ones that didn't work out for me was a no-brainer, even though there were some very nice ukuleles that were sold. But, now it's harder to decide what to sell, if anything. I don't want to regret a sale, but I want to be able to try other ukuleles, too, if the opportunity arises.

How have people here decided what to sell? Did you have seller's remorse?

Ukecaster
04-02-2019, 01:29 PM
Reviving this very old thread, since I'm trying to talk myself into selling a ukulele, but wonder if I'll regret it...How have people here decided what to sell? Did you have seller's remorse?

For me, it's whatever uke isn't getting played, usually because I have another of the same size, which I like better.

Ukecaster
04-02-2019, 01:30 PM
Reviving this very old thread, since I'm trying to talk myself into selling a ukulele, but wonder if I'll regret it...How have people here decided what to sell? Did you have seller's remorse?

For me, it's whatever uke isn't getting played, usually because I have another of the same size, which I like better.

EDW
04-02-2019, 02:32 PM
For the most part, I think about how much use it is getting and whether it is an instrument that speaks to me. If not, I make a decision and move on. Once I have parted with the instrument I try not to dwell on whether ti did the right thing or not. There is one instrument that I sometimes wonder if I should have sold, but generally I don't give the departed ones much thought. I enjoy what I have.

hendulele
04-02-2019, 02:58 PM
I've sold a couple early on I regretted selling later because now I realize when I acquired them they weren't set up properly. With a minor amount of work they would have been keepers. Live and learn. I really enjoy playing every one I have now. The only one I'd think about selling really isn't worth very much. If I decide to downsize, I'd rather give it to someone or donate it to a school or library rather than try to get a few dollars for it.

EDW
04-02-2019, 03:14 PM
There are many more ukuleles on the planet than players. Most ukuleles that have ever been made are sitting in cupboards collecting dust.
Also you are going to be alive for a long time, I hope. Next week or in 2025 you may want to play your unused uke for a few months, you never know. Why sell it if there is no real need for the money or storage space?


Because you will die and your family will sell them off for $20 each at a tag sale (although some of the really nice vintage ones will go for $10 because someone will convince your family that they are not of any value)

:rolleyes:

glennerd
04-02-2019, 03:22 PM
If in doubt, hang on to it. Also, you’re giving up something you like to try something unknown. I don’t know how many ukuleles I was convinced would be awesome that turned out to be nothing special (to me). If you’re selling a ukulele you have no attachment to, that’s a different story.

The only sale I very slightly regret is my first ukulele, but it wouldn’t cost much to replace if I really wanted.

Graham Greenbag
04-02-2019, 05:27 PM
Aloha everyone,

I was just wondering if anyone out there has ever had regrets or second thoughts about selling one of their ukes.

Mahalo

In a word: yes. However that doesn’t mean that I regret every sale, I just regret some.

I’ve read through the thread and the responses give a lot of really useful insight but (unless I missed it) there’s one angle I haven’t seen mentioned yet. The new (to me) Ukes that I buy I buy in the expectation that they will be better than the ones I already have. Ahead of a purchase I sell what I already have to provide funds and space for the incoming Uke. The logic of that method has some flaws to it and the key one is that the incoming doesn’t always match your expectations - some Ukes work for some people and not others and there’s a bit of hype about what’s good too. Another flaw is that the Uke that you have might not play as well as it ever can - an improved set-up and the right (for it) strings can make a big difference. Of course if the Uke that you are selling is one you no longer like, and your reasons for selling are well thought through, then don’t delay a sale on it except if you might need it as a spare of reasonable utility.

So, in summary, if funds aren’t that tight and you have enough space then always keep hold of what you have until the new purchase is properly evaluated and compared with what you already have.

Croaky Keith
04-02-2019, 11:01 PM
I haven't sold any, but I have given away six - no, no regrets - in fact , it made me feel good knowing that someone else could enjoy my cast offs.

Jerryc41
04-03-2019, 01:25 AM
Aloha everyone,

I was just wondering if anyone out there has ever had regrets or second thoughts about selling one of their ukes.

I have been agonizing about selling my Kanile'a Super Soprano. She was my first true uke love. I played her lovingly for six months and then I found that I had fallen for another - a Kanile'a (Lanikai label) Super Concert. It was truly love at first strum - I haven't put her down in months. I also haven't touched my super soprano in as many months. So, today I took her out and played a few tunes and - eh - it just doesn't do it for me anymore. I have been swayed by the bigger sound of the tenor.

I still love the super soprano, I guess just because she was my first. But is that good reason to keep her? Shouldn't she belong to someone who truly enjoys her sound and can appreciate everything about her? I hate to see her case up on the shelf and know that she won't get any serious play time in my house. But, will I ever go back to loving the soprano sound? And what about in the meantime? What should I do?

What do you think? Sell or keep?

Mahalo

At least three times, and I wound up re-buying. I didn't buy the same ukes back, but I did buy the same makes and models, and I'm glad I did. I recently sold three ukes, and I have several more I want to re-home. Still, I have fifty-three upstairs, so it's obvious that I have a hard time saying Goodbye.

I can understand your attachment to you Kanile'a soprano, but now you have the concert. Let someone else enjoy the Super soprano.

UkerDanno
04-03-2019, 02:33 AM
I always wish I had my 2nd uke, a Kala KA-CEM, sold it when I got a Martin C1K, because it was a financial stretch for me at the time. Since then I've gone through probably 30 ukes and no regrets buying or selling any of them, except for maybe the latest purchase, it was on sale, a Fender Zuma.

Jerryc41
04-03-2019, 02:43 AM
Because you will die and your family will sell them off for $20 each at a tag sale (although some of the really nice vintage ones will go for $10 because someone will convince your family that they are not of any value)

:rolleyes:

Nope! I have a list of what I have and what I paid, and my son - or someone - will use that as a guide in selling them. With any luck, I'll sell most of them before anyone else has to take responsibility. Of course, I'll need help from you people to do that. :D

Captain America
04-03-2019, 03:01 AM
I've sold an inexpensive Kala gloss that I just didn't bond with.

I try to keep in mind that if I buy something, I'm going to have it with me, particularly a musical instrument, FOREVER. It's among the junk and detritus of my life. See my basement.

So I'm very picky about acquisition in the first place.

Jerryc41
04-03-2019, 03:20 AM
I It's among the junk and detritus of my life.

"Detritus"? Did someone mention "detritus"? 116687

Swamp Yankee
04-03-2019, 03:24 AM
meh.... between ukes, banjos and guitars, I have bought and sold scores of instruments over the past 15 years. Right now, only one transaction comes to mind as being something I have any regrets about - the Taylor GS Mini mahogany top guitar that I sold in the summer of 2017.

I had two other GS Minis at the time, one in koa, and my first, spruce top over rosewood. Since the mahogany was the newest, I reasoned I'd get more money selling it and the koa GSM and keeping the spruce top, which has some fret wear.

But- the mahogany top GSM was the best sounding of the lot, even though it was the least expensive. Looking back, I should have sold off the koa and the spruce top and kept the hog.

Most recently I traded a Waterloo WL-S guitar for my Kiwaya koa tenor... no regrets, and I have on consignment, a Taylor 562ce all mahogany 12 string/ 12 fret guitar which is, hands down, the most beautiful and expensive guitar I've ever owned... but I never bonded with these so... no regrets.

Cliff E
04-03-2019, 03:49 AM
There was a very large family in my parish in which two of the kids were sharing an $18 uke. I gave the parents a nice Lanikai tenor that I bought off Craig's List for a good price and a Kmise banjolele that I no longer wanted to give to their kids. Reports were that the kids were overjoyed and even more dedicated. Nonetheless, I started to regret not having a nice cheaper tenor that wouldn't have me nervous taking it out of the house and on trips.

This tinge of regret was overcome when I later saw the kids having so much fun with it and improving their skills.

AustinHing
04-03-2019, 04:17 AM
I've sold an inexpensive Kala gloss that I just didn't bond with.

I try to keep in mind that if I buy something, I'm going to have it with me, particularly a musical instrument, FOREVER. It's among the junk and detritus of my life. See my basement.

So I'm very picky about acquisition in the first place.

You need this uke!
116688

Jerryc41
04-03-2019, 04:24 AM
You need this uke!
116688

Er, no I don't. :)

Clever, though. All the "special" ukes turning up shows how popular ukuleles have gotten lately.

Jerryc41
04-03-2019, 04:54 AM
You need this uke!
116688

Er, no I don't. :)

Clever, though. All the "special" ukes turning up shows how popular ukuleles have gotten lately.

YogiTom
04-03-2019, 05:00 AM
... This tinge of regret was overcome when I later saw the kids having so much fun with it and improving their skills.

1000x this. The rewards of passing the joy of music on to others are priceless, imho.

Gmontema
04-03-2019, 09:26 PM
I started to regret not having a nice cheaper tenor that wouldn't have me nervous taking it out of the house and on trips.

I hear you on this. However after buying my handcrafted Iriguchi and after speaking with David the luthier, Iíve come to think of my ukes has playable and portable art. He said ukes are meant to be experienced and not just looked at. The wabi sabi finish enables scratches and imperfections that add unique character to the instrument.

From there, It was liberating to take my ukes out of cases and hang them on walls. I now take my prized ukes on trips to ukulele club and on trips. I get that dings can happen, but so what. At least I get to hear a great sounding uke wherever I am. Going out and about with a lesser sounding uke was always tainted by the thought that one of my better sounding ukes would have been better in that situation. Now I have no such regrets. If my fancy and expensive uke get scratched, oh well. Maybe that would serve as a reminder of where I was at the time. Anyway, Iíve prioritized sound over cosmetic risk and I havenít looked back.

Jerryc41
04-04-2019, 12:55 AM
I hear you on this. However after buying my handcrafted Iriguchi and after speaking with David the luthier, I’ve come to think of my ukes has playable and portable art. He said ukes are meant to be experienced and not just looked at. The wabi sabi finish enables scratches and imperfections that add unique character to the instrument.

From there, It was liberating to take my ukes out of cases and hang them on walls. I now take my prized ukes on trips to ukulele club and on trips. I get that dings can happen, but so what. At least I get to hear a great sounding uke wherever I am. Going out and about with a lesser sounding uke was always tainted by the thought that one of my better sounding ukes would have been better in that situation. Now I have no such regrets. If my fancy and expensive uke get scratched, oh well. Maybe that would serve as a reminder of where I was at the time. Anyway, I’ve prioritized sound over cosmetic risk and I haven’t looked back.

That's a very liberating idea

Gmontema
04-04-2019, 09:19 AM
That's a very liberating idea

What’s even better is that taking the ukes out of the house enables others to learn that a real uke does not sound like a cheap toy. Also, there are uke enthusiasts out there that have never sound sampled. At my uke club, we have an easy going culture. People feel comfortable asking others about their ukes and how they sound. How sad the uke world would be if people only took out their “beaters”.

Jerryc41
04-04-2019, 09:32 AM
At my uke club, we have an easy going culture.

My groups readily swap ukes to try different ones, especially when someone arrives with a new uke. I bring a regular uke and a banjo uke just about every time.