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bluesuke
05-26-2010, 03:57 AM
I have used it on 2 projects . And had good results but the problem is if bang it hard you get a white spot . No flaking or anything it was sprayed over there sanding sealer. Do you think it is a adhesion problem? I did a sample of it sprayed over Zpoxy and if I smack it no white spot . I guess what I'm asking would it be bad to spray right over Zpoxy with out something between them ?


Thanks Perry

Vic D
05-26-2010, 04:14 AM
I don't have enough experience to respond really but after switching to zinsser shellac as a sealer I'm wondering what to do with the gallon of waterbased sealer I bought. I had problems with the original sealer I bought, lots of problems... With the shellac as a sealer everything is now golden. I'll probably switch to the zpoxy too, and do the zpoxy/shellac/waterbase clear thang in the future...

Flyfish57
05-26-2010, 04:52 AM
For me it's hard to tell if I broke through the epoxy to the wood so I always use a sealer. It's so much easier than adding another coat of epoxy.
I had adhesion problems with the ColorTone sanding sealer...I used Behlen's spray bomb sealer in a pinch and had good results over epoxy. I prefer to just use shellac though.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
05-26-2010, 05:23 AM
Yep, that's an adhesion problem. In time you may even see some lift around tuner holes, bridges, etc with extreme cases.
I don't know anything about Color Tone except for my brief experience with their water based product. I didn't even know they made a nitro cellulose. But a couple of things in general.
A sealer coat is a must, either the one recommended for the product (vinyl sealer for nitro) or shellac. Timing seems to be somewhat critical as well. With epoxy as a pore filler, I'd wait 72 hours or more before applying the sealer coat. Once the sealer coat is on however, try to get your first base finish cot on as soon as it dries, within 10 minutes or so.

Matt Clara
05-28-2010, 03:16 AM
Yep, that's an adhesion problem. In time you may even see some lift around tuner holes, bridges, etc with extreme cases.
I don't know anything about Color Tone except for my brief experience with their water based product. I didn't even know they made a nitro cellulose. But a couple of things in general.
A sealer coat is a must, either the one recommended for the product (vinyl sealer for nitro) or shellac. Timing seems to be somewhat critical as well. With epoxy as a pore filler, I'd wait 72 hours or more before applying the sealer coat. Once the sealer coat is on however, try to get your first base finish cot on as soon as it dries, within 10 minutes or so.

What are you using these days, Chuck? Still working on your stock of McFadden?

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
05-28-2010, 06:11 AM
I'm having pretty good success with the Mohawk although application is a bit more finicky. Mcfadden is available again but it'll be a while before anyone brings it in to Hawaii. (God knows I've tried....) LMI is carrying it but it would likely cost me over $100 a gallon after shipping. If they decide to ship.
I'm working on getting some Sherwinn Williams lacquer in, the same product that Martin Guitar has used for ages.

Steve vanPelt
05-28-2010, 07:28 AM
Just ever so slightly off topic.... Got a tip that Target Coating em6000 water base production lacquer is working well for some folks, so thought I'll give it a try. It's supposed to have 'burn in technology' in a waterbase product. I've never liked waterbased in the past, but haven't tried any for 10 years or more, might be better now. Maybe over epoxy it will have some depth to it.

Anyway, http://www.targetcoatings.com/shop/products/EmTech_6000_Production_Lacquer_Gloss_1Gal-268-0.html has it on sale right now for $37.60 a gallon with free shipping. I ordered a gallon to check it out. Sale price doesn't come up to the end.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
05-28-2010, 08:36 AM
I've done a good deal of research on EM6000 but haven't pulled the trigger yet. Even some proponents of EM6000 dispute the 100% burn-in claim and the timing of application seems to be critical. Also, avoid wet sanding between coats to eliminate witness lines that are problematic with water based lacquers. Dry sanding seems to work but it loads up fast on your papers. It tends to blush in warmer and more humid environments more than nitro. A big improvement over past WB lacquers is that it doesn't seem to have a blue cast to it. But it is so clear that it lacks warmth. Many builders are adding a bit of amber dye to mimic nitro. Expect to change your current spraying set up to work with the stuff. Good luck with it. Let us know. It's the future.

Steve vanPelt
05-28-2010, 10:07 AM
Expect to change your current spraying set up to work with the stuff.

Yeah, I guess. My current spray set up is rattle cans of Behlen's. Been expecting to get a 4 stage turbine since I used one spraying trim a few years ago, long before ever thinking about building an 'uke, so it gets to go in the shop investment column, not the 'ukulele column. Married people will understand and appreciate the difference. As a matter of fact, my young grandsons each need a rocking horse and I have to have something good to finish them with.:o

Haven't researched it much, just took it on good faith that it's something I should check out. It's nice to have the freedom to try *whatever* on a whim, just to see how well it works...or doesn't. Had a long conversation with a builder at the Tahoe Uke Fest about UV poly. Durable as all get out, looks good and spray to buff is 4 hours. BIG investment for a guy like me, though.

So I'll give this 6000 stuff a try and let you all know my experience with it, but it might be a while. And Chuck, thanks for the tips on using it.

Steve