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Vic D
05-27-2010, 04:18 PM
Don't look at me, I'm a noob. So what do you look for in a tone wood? I like poplar (tulip?), but where can I find quartersawn poplar? I'm sure I'll think of more questions to ask as the thread progresses.

fahrner
05-27-2010, 05:06 PM
About two years ago I had the good fortune to tour the Santa Cruz Guitar Co. here in town. We came upon an area where they were selecting tops from a stack of sticked blanks. Richard picked up one of the blanks and proceeded to rap it with his knuckle, listening to the tone of the wood. He went through several and I was amazed at the different tones even though they were all the same species. When I came home that day I sliced up some Douglas Fur to recreate the phenomena. Amazing. Doug Fur sounds pretty good.
Over the past few weeks I've cut blanks for uke tops out of Mahogany, Sapele and Western Red Cedar. The WRC blows me away. Interestingly again, of the eight or so WRC blanks, two or three sound really phenomenal. Cut a thin slice of Walnut the other day and it to has a very nice ring or chime with nice harmonics and sustain. Will they make good ukuleles? I don't know but some wood is definitely more musical than others. Today I tapped a piece of Wenge I had cut for another project. It's about 4"x10"x .250". It has a ring that sounds just like the Brazilian Rosewood in the video (link attached). I think the bottom line is that you have to look at what is being used successfully (sounds good) and listen to the wood you build with and how it turns out sound wise. So, use the first part of that statement as a guide and the second part as your own development and conviction.
First video from Brad. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NY5Fdbf_zsg&playnext_from=TL&videos=KuQCCpcmLfM
This one from Kim Walker.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3JhauyBQ8Y
So Vic; What's it sound like when you tap tulip?

Vic D
05-27-2010, 05:19 PM
It ( the poplar I've used so far ) has a nice ring to it when thick but not like say walnut... but at the right thickness it's more like a bassy wood block. The one uke I've built from it didn't dissapoint me either... combined with a one piece spruce top I got a nice bassy warm tone with good sustain. Redwood did fool me though, it was much brighter than I expected. Of course it could have been the particular piece of redwood. The stuff was supposed to be air dried for like 50 years or something. Some folks like bright though.
I say I've built one from poplar but I'm in the dungeon now looking at a stack of 6 of them. Gluing blocks and hopefully closing some of them up tommorow.

fahrner
05-27-2010, 05:26 PM
It ( the poplar I've used so far ) has a nice ring to it when thick but not like say walnut... but at the right thickness it's more like a bassy wood block. The one uke I've built from it didn't dissapoint me either... combined with a one piece spruce top I got a nice bassy warm tone with good sustain. Redwood did fool me though, it was much brighter than I expected. Of course it could have been the particular piece of redwood. The stuff was supposed to be air dried for like 50 years or something. Some folks like bright though.
So many variables. Would think Redwood would sound great. Assume you've tried different strings?
I just went through the shop tapping several pieces of plywood. No surprise there; they all sounded pretty dead.
Wonder what Keefs B&S sounds like when he taps it. Probably pretty good.

Edit; In all fairness to plywood, I've not tapped any of the good stuff like 5 ply shop grade nor the HPL.
Which reminds me of an article from a few years back where a guy made his own archtop guitar tops by laminating three thin pieces of wood, placing it in a male/female mold and parking one wheel of his pick-up camper over the mold while the glue dried. Claimed they sounded pretty good acoustically.

Vic D
05-27-2010, 06:18 PM
From what I hear, the strings did make a big difference. I bet Keef's B&S sounds like a bell. :D
There's a book on tap tuning I'ma haff to pick up one of these days... along with Cumpiano's and a couple others. I've watched some videos on the tap tuning deal and I'm convinced.

Dominator
05-27-2010, 06:27 PM
Cut a thin slice of Walnut the other day and it to has a very nice ring or chime with nice harmonics and sustain.

I don't understand this whole tone tapping thing. I've read a bit about it but still don't understand it in order to use it to my advantage. How does one hold a piece of wood and tap it and determine whether it has nice harmonics? I have not searched Youtube but I would like to see a video demonstration of this tap tone stuff. Anybody know of any existing videos?

Vic D
05-27-2010, 06:29 PM
This is an excellent video, the one that got me interested. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3JhauyBQ8Y
He uses all the usual suspects in his demonstration, I'd like to hear him talk about... wait for it... wait for it... poplar... and other less used woods.
And then there's this video on top tuning featuring this Benno Streu dude... I found this one very interesting. I'ma watch it again. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ajn0TmhvwCU&feature=related
Caution! There are guitars in these videos! Ukuleles are not guitars.

Dominator
05-27-2010, 06:29 PM
I've watched some videos on the tap tuning deal and I'm convinced.

Hey Vic, we must have been typing at the same time. Got any links for those vids?

Vic D
05-27-2010, 06:59 PM
Hey Vic, we must have been typing at the same time. Got any links for those vids?

Synchronicity... we did it again... :D see the links in my previous post. Of course you've probably done that by now. ""It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards". The White Queen - Through The Looking Glass

Melatonin, take me away...

Dominator
05-27-2010, 07:04 PM
Thanks for the link Vic. Interesting. I had never thought to search YT for info on tap tone.

Pete Howlett
05-27-2010, 10:09 PM
These are my highly flammable views on this misleading subject. Read with caution!

Tap tone for ukes? Naaah... I even question this for guitars. You don't want it to be woolly and you certainly need it to ring but what is 'tap tone'. I'd defy anyone to define it because it is subjective. From a timber technology point we know that softwoods transmit sound well and hardwoods reflect it. As for the rest - hey I'm just a builder, not a luthier! And BTW, IMHO this sort of guff was invented by boutique builders who wanted to add kudos, premium and mystique to their work. True, violin makers 'tune' the plates on a violin and I think this is where the thinking is derived from but of course, that is an entirely different discussion, different instrument and certainly a different acoustic physics. What those luthiers did who started this whole baloney off was want to charge more for their instruments, plain and simple. Ultimately they invented a pseudo science that has no means of true measurement. Early Martin guitars which are the benchmark for the 'vintage' concept of both look and sound had their wood 'graded' or selected, were essentially hand built/made very cleanly and were not subjected to a poncey idea of what a guitar 'should' sound like. In fact, they were under marketed and sold simply on their quality...


All you need to do to check whether or not you have a good spruce top is first to check it's mass against its elasticity - in other words is it light, flexible and strong. Next, drop it from a height of about 12" on it's end to hear it 'ring' - that 'donk' you often hear in horror movies when the protagonist totals the antagonist with a baseball bat... and check the sustain; you do want it to be a 'bell-like' tone.
Next, how well balanced are the growth rings - never mind the count, look to see where the hard winters were and the long summers. If the tree grew in an 'uneven' climate this will show in the grain. You can do none if this with hardwoods because the cellular structure is entirely different. For bluegrass guitars you want a 'glassy', 'brittle' tone when you end drop your back plates. For fingerstyle that has to be 'warmer' with more 'sustain'.
And if you really want to know what top wood to go for for ukulele it is WRC because it is 'soft' and 'light' and will transmit sound very well but for guitars it is wide grain red spruce - best Martin I ever played a ring count of 5 to the inch and was almost rift sawn...


Now here's a thing: at the weekend I played a very high end guitar from a builder who is now charging over $15,000 per instrument. It was well made but it sucked and for an OM size piece, it lacked power, character and tone. This guy tap tones and tunes his instruments....

SweetWaterBlue
05-28-2010, 12:59 AM
I found the video from Kim Walker to be especially confusing. He taps all the woods, and they all sound quite a bit different. Some don't seem to have much ring at all to my ears, yet in the end he usually says they will make good tops. What they sounded like when tapped didn't seem to make much difference to him. The video by Brad seemed to indicate he was looking for a wood with a nice ring, but more than that I really couldn't take away from the vid.

I know that ukes with spruce tops I have played and listened to in group sessions are louder (but not as mellow) than say one with mahogany, so clearly the wood makes a difference, but it all seems pretty subjective. I have tapped all my mahogany. Once piece clearly stands above the rest in "bell like ring" quality. Based on what has been said, I suspect it will make the best top.

Matt Clara
05-28-2010, 03:07 AM
You guys are making this too difficult:

13158
A simple card should suffice.

Michael N.
05-28-2010, 03:27 AM
I'm not a tap tone enthusiast. The last bit of Walnut I used sounded dull and lifeless when tapped. All I can state is that the resulting sound was nothing like it's tap tone. -thankfully. I also have a few pieces of real junk Spruce that my supplier uses for outer packing. It's full of knots, pitch marks and has serious runout. The stuff rings like a bell.
I also once read a comment by a well known Fiddle restorer who said that when he tapped a Strad top plate it sounded like cardboard.
For Spruce tops I select on weight. My take on it is that light without being floppy is more the ideal.

Ken W
05-28-2010, 06:11 AM
I'll probably get shot completely out of the water for this reply because I'm going to reference another instrument....but not a guitar, because guitars are not ukuleles. I realize that mountain dulcimers are not ukuleles either, but they are stringed and fretted instruments that get much of their tonal quality from the vibration of their top. Part of the beauty of this instrument is the variety of sounds that you get by making them out of various locally grown woods. I guess that is part of their "folkiness." Those made of cherry and poplar have a bright bell-like tone, walnut is warm and rich, put on a spruce or ceder top and you get lots of sustain...you get the idea. I realize that those building professionally may be uncomfortable straying too far afield from what are considered the traditional woods, but I encourage others who are not building for the market to build and enjoy locally grown wood. Dave G.....I've seen your videos...I know that you get this. Maybe that is how koa became so popular on the Island. It's local and beautiful.

fahrner
05-28-2010, 06:44 AM
I'll probably get shot completely out of the water for this reply because I'm going to reference another instrument....but not a guitar, because guitars are not ukuleles. I realize that mountain dulcimers are not ukuleles either, but they are stringed and fretted instruments that get much of their tonal quality from the vibration of their top. Part of the beauty of this instrument is the variety of sounds that you get by making them out of various locally grown woods. I guess that is part of their "folkiness." Those made of cherry and poplar have a bright bell-like tone, walnut is warm and rich, put on a spruce or ceder top and you get lots of sustain...you get the idea. I realize that those building professionally may be uncomfortable straying too far afield from what are considered the traditional woods, but I encourage others who are not building for the market to build and enjoy locally grown wood. Dave G.....I've seen your videos...I know that you get this. Maybe that is how koa became so popular on the Island. It's local and beautiful.
Ken, thanks for your post. All you said makes a whole lot of sense and I think you provided some good relevant insight. If you get shot at, I'll stand with you. :~).
I've got a small slab of redwood burl out in the shop someplace. I'm now encouraged to dig it up and see if I got enough for a uke top. Being that its soft and somewhat squirrelly it's probably not a good choice for back and sides.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
05-28-2010, 06:46 AM
Ever notice how guys who tap tune NEVER look you in the eye when they attempt to explain what they're doing? Hah! They sound like politicians. I took a workshop recently on tap tuning. Couldn't get one straight or definitive answer. Entertaining show though, lot of smoke and mirrors. Ever buy a paring knife from one of those carnies who are able to carve perfect roses out of radishes?
Perhaps I'm being a but harsh though........
Me? What Pete said in his item #1, followed by deflection testing of the actual plates.

Vic D
05-28-2010, 07:00 AM
Excellent thread. So far the responses to tap tone have been what I expected and generally mimic the discussions I've gleaned from other sites. A large percentage of builders/luthiers consider the tap tone theories to be rubbish, but then again a lot of folks once considered the earth to be flat. I'm keeping an open mind on the issue and I'll continue to study it. In the meantime, here's a brief exerpt and then a link to an article dealing with the great violin builders.

"Several luthiers (violin makers) have carefully taken apart some of those old instruments made in Cremona, then reproduced to a fraction of a millimeter the instruments’ original dimensions. Yet no one has yet succeeded in perfectly reproducing the sound of a Stradivarius or a Guarnarius. The physicist Félix Savart, back in the eighteenth century, worked on the problem and undertook numerous experiments with parts of Stradivarius instruments. He was convinced that the earlier luthiers, using special tools to tap, could identify the woods that worked best."

http://artsalive.ca/collections/nacmusicbox/en/index.php?pageid=essays/essaygreatviolinsdemystified

Respectfully,
Vic

thistle3585
05-28-2010, 07:24 AM
I don't tap tune, as defined by Siminoff where he is trying to tune the top or back to a specific note, but I do tap on the back as I carve the braces. I hold it where the neck block attaches and rap on it about where the bridge sits. I fine tune, as in finely carve, the braces and stop when I start to hear a nice ring to it. I distinctly hear it transition from a thud to a ring when I carve the braces. I can't say that it helps but it makes me feel better, and I don't tell people I tap tune instruments.

I think the idea to tap tuning, as well as deflection tuning, is to be able to create a process which allows you to create the same tone from instrument to instrument. Maybe create a "signature tone"? I always got a kick out the tap tuning discussions and specifically am completely befuddled with the chladni tuning. I think a lot of new builders look at tap tuning as a formula that will decrease the learning curve.

I'd never believe anyone that says that have discovered Strads secret because there is only one Strad that hasn't been altered,and its unplayable, so who knows what they actually sounded like.

fahrner
05-28-2010, 07:33 AM
Ever notice how guys who tap tune NEVER look you in the eye when they attempt to explain what they're doing? Hah! They sound like politicians. I took a workshop recently on tap tuning. Couldn't get one straight or definitive answer. Entertaining show though, lot of smoke and mirrors. Ever buy a paring knife from one of those carnies who are able to carve perfect roses out of radishes?
Perhaps I'm being a but harsh though........
Me? What Pete said in his item #1, followed by deflection testing of the actual plates.
Chuck, it may just sound like I'm nit-picking again. Perhaps it is a bit of my nature but please don't take it personally. Your talking about tap tuning which I think is a bit different than taping wood for tone as part of the selection process. One of the books I read a while back suggested that you tap your wood at each step of the process and listen to the change as the result of what you just did..... added a brace or what ever. It went so far to suggest that you could learn to tune your braces and tone bars using this process. While the article did not tell me precisely what I would hear or even what to listen for, it seemed very plausible and made perfect sense. While it did not give me a precise tangible measurement I ended up thinking it was a skill I could develop over time and with practice. At no time did I feel I was dealing with a shifty eyed car salesman and since I had already bought his book, he had nothing more to gain. When I pick up a piece of wood and rap it, I can hear its musical qualities. That is something that is very tangibly there. As I said earlier I don't know what that means yet. As Pete says, it may not mean anything for a ukulele. Maybe if one just wanted to make loud plunkers it would not matter (I don't mean Pete or you or anyone else here). I gotta think there's something to it.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
05-28-2010, 08:28 AM
I've seen guitar plates brought through the process of tap tuning. In those cases, the builder seems to be able to achieve what he is after. A ukulele plate is much too small for me to be successful with it however. I do admit that I always tap, rub, and flex the plates as I am sanding them. I'm not sure exactly why, it's just part of the tactile experience that seems to be necessary. I'm a huge fan of deflection tuning, (ala David Hurd), and it's the only time I rely on numbers.
But the original question was about wood selection I believe. I work with koa primarily and that's what I can confidently talk about.
First thing I look for is grain. It needs to be quarter sawn of course, with little or no runout, and I want the grain to be vertical and parallel as much as possible along it's length. Curl is a good thing in my case, the more consistent and evenly spaced, the better. I don't want to see any stress areas in the board. Wild grain patterns are pretty but are also problematic for me. Some of the "prettiest", wildest koa needs to be set aside for picture frames and Christmas gifts.
I look for wood that is defect free. No checking, cracking, pin knots, bug holes, rot, or other obvious inclusions. Of course you never really know what you're getting until you start resawing.
I also want to know how dry it is and how it has been dried. I prefer air dried to kin dried. In their haste to turn over wood quickly, many sawyers will rush the kiln drying process, severely damaging the cellular structure of the wood. Wood that's been dried too fast can be "dead". I check moisture with a Wagner pinless meter. I resaw at about 12% (because it saws easier) and I build between 6% and 8%. My wood sets are cut and rested for at least a couple of years before I use them. It might be overkill but I just feel better working with relaxed wood. I buy both dry and green wood. If it's "dry", it'll still go through several stages of further drying before I use it. A big mistake some people make is buying either sets from a supplier or lumber from a dealer and immediately begin working with it. The wood needs time to get adjusted to your working environment. If it's green wood, I know I've just made an "investment" and it'll be many years before I can use it.
Now here comes the hocus-pocus part--- I rub the board with my hands. It's a goofy thing to do but I can get a sense of it's tonally quality by the reaction to my hands when I lightly stroke the wood along it's length. There is a sound and a feeling that's hard to explain. I think I can get a sense of the wood's density by doing this. It's probably bogus but I do it anyway.
Then, as Pete mentioned in his first point, I will do the drop test, preferably on a concrete floor. Again, I'm looking for a tone rather than a racket.
Even through careful selection, there are many times when I am fooled. I pay healthy prices for the koa I use--anywhere from $45 to $75 per board foot (and just recently $150 bf on koa I couldn't turn my back on.) Still, I discard half of the wood I buy as being unsuitable for various reasons.
Proper tonewood selection is a small but crucial part of building excellent ukuleles. As careful as you might be though, what you do with the wood, your techniques and your approach to building is where the real "secret" of successful instruments lies.

Pete Howlett
05-28-2010, 08:33 AM
Lets look at it - it's a ukulele, a folk instrument that has about as much sophistication about it as a boiled egg. It is not really meant to behave un a super-sonic way; it's just that in our modern technological age we want answers to complex questions fast, now. The information overload environment which we now occupy allows all sorts of 'thought' into our space and because we want it explaining there is a thirst which is constantly quenched by individuals, some who know what they are talking about and a lot who don't.

I think it boils down to what you want from an instrument. You come to Pete Howlett and you get a fairly plain but well constructed ukulele that has good balance, volume and sweet tone. You go to Chuck and you get all that plus the bling for which we all live in awe off :) If you want it to behave sonically like a guitar then I think you are barking up the wrong tree and ought to be building guitars because, and let's face it, this concept/discussion is fuelled almost entirely from information derived from guitar builders. Only Chuck has refered to David Hurd's treatise on deflection testing. Now ask yourselves: "Why is the premier ukulele builder in Hawaii looking to David Hurd's studies?". If you are going to get anywhere in this business it pays to listen and learn... I certainly sit up when Chuck shares his knowledge.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
05-28-2010, 09:47 AM
You give me more credit than I deserve Pete. I'm happy being the best builder on my block. (It's a pretty long block.)
David Hurd is a scientist. He gave up building ukes a few years ago. They were/are amazing instruments. He makes fishing lures now. Go figure.
What his methods have taught me is how to consistently repeat successful results I've had in the past through carefully measuring and recording specific data. As my physical senses deteriorate as a natural part of the aging process, it's helpful to be able to refer to some of that data. It's not fool proof but it's a good back up. For instance, the final carving I do to my sound board braces is when the top is glued to the sides but before the back is attached so that I still have access to the braces. If the top still seems stiff in certain areas I'll throw the deflection measuring device on it and double check it against successful results I've had in the past using similar wood. If the numbers are outside of the acceptable range I will make adjustments. I'll also measure deflection when I'm running the plates through my drum sander along with flexing it by hand, rapping it with my knuckles, running my hand along the surface, smelling it, staring at it, talking to it, etc. It's not a silver bullet but an easy way to double check my progress. The idea is simple. First you need to build a great sounding instrument. Then, assuming that top deflection contributes at least in part to that quality, the sound board is "mapped out" and deflection measurements are made in several places. These are then duplicated in your current instrument. This all all probably more hocus-pocus, but it's hocus-pocus I enjoy, feel comfortable with and it fits in with my style of building. It appeals to the bit of scientist in me and my need to be able to have control over certain aspects of my process. I think it's important that your methodology fits who you are as a person, not the other way around. When David first played one of my ukes he said that I instinctively did what he's been trying to teach people scientifically for years. So.....since I've had no success with tap tuning I've become a fan of deflection testing. David's book is packed with data on wood properties, string tension, gluing strengths, etc. Most of it I can't claim to understand, packed with graphs and spread sheets. You might find some of it useful, maybe not. Depends who you are. I glean little bits of information every place I can and adopt it if if fits my style. I haven't ruled out fortune tellers if it helps me build a better instrument.
BTW, on tonewood selection? David used to wait for the day when the local home improvement store got a fresh shipment of lumber in. Then he'd spend hours going through a stack of common Douglass fir, selecting just a few boards for his ukulele tops. Then he rejected half of those after he got home.
I've spent countless hours researching this stuff. I enjoy the research but I have found no answers. It's all mental masturbation. Trust no one. Do whatever you're comfortable with. No amount of research will ever be able to replace experience. Just keep building and know that it's only a mistake if you haven't learned anything from it.

Pete Howlett
05-28-2010, 10:34 AM
If I could add another couple of $100 to my basic instruments I'd do the deflection testing. Sadly, it is a hard business being a builder and without recourse to the value added that bling brings I will have to work hard on my mojo - it's seen me right so far. And don't be so modest Chuck :)

Timbuck
05-28-2010, 11:34 AM
Pete! you could copy "Honda Motor Cycle sales" they make some of the best top end bikes in the world..
Such as the Super dooper "Honda Golden Wing":drool:...But!! it's the "Best selling motorcycle in the world" the bread and butter of Honda "The 50cc Honda Cub" that really brings in the cash, they make millions of them each year and have done for the last 30 years.:D

Pete Howlett
05-28-2010, 12:06 PM
Sorry Ken, you've lost me... it takes as much time to build a tenor as it does a soprano.

Dave Higham
05-28-2010, 08:42 PM
I think Ken's saying that you'll make more money out of your cheapest model than you will from your full bling bells and whistles ones. But that doesn't apply if you only make to order.

Timbuck
05-28-2010, 10:23 PM
I think Ken's saying that you'll make more money out of your cheapest model than you will from your full bling bells and whistles ones.
Yup! that's what I mean't ..You were considering having uke's made to your spec's: in China, a few month's back.:D

Vic D
05-29-2010, 12:56 AM
When I was a kid, I remember being told that Honda was a bad word, like a cuss word and I wasn't allowed to say it. Took me a long time to figure out it was cause my grandfather sold Yamaha. I never did get that mini-trail I wanted.

Pete Howlett
05-29-2010, 01:53 AM
I was looking at eastern Europe rather than China - however, everyman and his dog is making now and I notice, and this is a good barometer, that Rigk Sauer of risa instruments has completely scaled down his own branded ukes in favor of China. Rigk is savvy so I am guessing there is not a lot of call for another European produced ukulele.

Sven
05-29-2010, 08:09 AM
Hey Pete, I could... eh ... string your ukuleles after you build them. That might be a great time saver for you, no?

Sven

Kekani
05-29-2010, 08:31 AM
Whenever there's a post on tap tuning, I revisit what I do and look in the mirror. I always remember what I thought I wanted to learn, and usually go back to Willam Cumpiano http://www.cumpiano.com/Home/Newsletters/Issues/twentythree.htm

Not unlike Chuck, I tap, and not unlike Derek Shimizu taught me, I don't thin to the point of structural integrity (this is where deflection testing would help).

As Cumpiano states, there comes point in time where you are experienced enough to project what is going to be the end result. Through testing (when building), there have been little tweaks here (bracing profile), little tweaks there (reversed kerfed linings), little tweaks everywhere (arched bracing, scallops, etc) that allow builders (myself anyway) to have some confidence in the end result.

So, how do I explain a top that has been thinned too much to the point of a good "ring", but ended too "soft", and had the braces left thicker to the point of "killing" the ring, and end up with an instrument that I can sell (this is a measure by which I know - there have been a couple I haven't sold, but not because it didn't sound good; I give them away to friends, who usually enjoy them)? I can't. Same goes true for the "dead" plate at the right thickness and stiffness, with bracing carved a little more here/there, and end up with an instrument I can sell? I can't.

It used to drive me nuts wondering, "What is this going to sound like? I hope it sounds good." Now, I think Chuck and Pete can attest to this, I pretty much know what the end result is going to be based on how the instrument is built, and the woods used in building it. Only when I venture into something new do I have an inkling of the unknown. Coincidentally, that's right now, as I have two redwood topped instruments (one is being donated to the `Ukulele Guild of Hawai`i this July), and I've never done Redwood before. I also have a Milo Spruce with a soundport because some guy in Kalihi asked me to put it in. I'm sure some of us will see this one around. Bottom line, most of the rest of the build hasn't changed, so I have some confidence knowing what the other variables will impart.

-Aaron

Pete Howlett
05-29-2010, 11:36 AM
Sven - I'd have you doing more than that with your skills! I'd like to have the time to research more but keeping the creditors from the door is more important. And I guess what it really boils down to is if you care enough about what you are doing and do it with a true passion then you will get to a point where your work is becoming consistent. I hope mine is anyway - consistently good that is.

Sven
05-29-2010, 12:00 PM
Ah, thanks for the compliment Pete. Consistency is what I strive for. But still, and in the foreseeable future I keep my creditors at bay by being good at my day job, working more than full time as an architect pays enough. The drawback is of course that I'm often too tired or stressed out to make the instruments I've sort of promised people are on their way. Day job hinders the hobby, which in turn hinders the home maintenance. And that bugs my pretty wife. What can a poor boy do? (Except of course than to sing in a rock'n'roll band...)

G'night / Sven