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View Full Version : Grover Sta-Tite Uke Tuners? Measurements?



haole
05-30-2010, 12:52 PM
My old Aria baritone ukulele (family heirloom) could really use a new set of tuners. It has a slotted headstock like a classical guitar, and the tuner posts would only have to go through about .25" of wood. The holes for the strings are drilled at .5" up from the backplate of the tuning machine. I've been looking at the Grover Sta-Tites on StewMac, but they don't have the detailed specs for the ukulele tuners (just for the guitar version). I know that these are pretty popular in these parts, so I figured I'd ask: What are the measurements of the Grover Sta-Tites for ukes? I'm not too worried about drilling new screw holes or widening the holes in the headstock; my biggest concern is getting the string hole in the right place, because anything at more than .6" from the backplate is probably too much.

Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thank you all in advance. :D

Vic D
05-30-2010, 01:33 PM
NOooooooooooooo... please don't drill or do anything like that to that uke... please don't lol. If you'll give me a day I'll research it for you and see if I can find suitable tuners.
I had an Aria SG copy I picked up 23 years ago for like 100 bucks... one of the best guitars I ever owned. The tone and resonance was phenomenal, very punchy kinda like a nice Tele but with the cool Angus Young look... well actually it was kinda like playing an SG lol. Arias are going up in value. I wouldn't touch that uke unless it was by a professional luthier, and then only to restore to original.
What model is it? I didn't even know Aria made ukes.

haole
05-30-2010, 02:23 PM
You really think it might be worth something? D: It's a 1980 "Pepe Guitar" from the Nagoya workshop. The model number is P-49-4 (there was a regular P-49 six-string too). I guess it was meant to be a four-string classical guitar but it's the same size as a baritone uke and I keep it strung like one.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v34/brushfirefairytale/IMG_0957.jpg
(you can probably tell which one it is!)

It's not in great condition but it has sentimental value to me and I do like playing it. Just wish the tuners didn't suck; the friction pegs on my Harmony work better. :B

Vic D
05-30-2010, 02:25 PM
Is that a green label Harmony on the left? nice collection. Yes it will be worth something if you hold on to it. I'll do the research tommorow and get back to you. That's a beautiful Aria, even if the top isn't perfectly quartersawn. I'll have to say though... I don't care for the string spacing on it.. looks very amateurish... It looks like they took a 6 string and made a 4 string without much thought to the string spacing.. hmmm how does it play and sound? I still wouldn't touch it with any tools. Just glancing.. that thang is worth a few bucks.

haole
05-30-2010, 02:34 PM
Yeah, the Harmony is apparently from the early 60s. Doubt it's worth more than a few sets of strings these days, though. I bought it for $30, replaced the tuners and bridge, and then my girlfriend sat on it and pretty much totaled it. I glued it back together and it plays alright, though!

I'm not in a rush to sell the Aria; it was my grandfather's and I'd love to be able to play it. Thanks for the help!

Vic D
05-30-2010, 02:54 PM
What did you "glue back"? on the Harmony, With what type of glue? There's a 6 string version of this Aria 1/2 size guitar on the net but nothing on this 4 string unit. I understand the sentimental value.. that's why I urged not to go at it with any tools. Who knows.. this could be a limited production, and by the looks of it I'd say it is.

BTW.. did you do a youtube clip with your Harmony? Very early Harmony ukes were made pretty well... they do need a little tweaking though in my experience... if you can trade out the saddle and nut without disturbing the uke too much it might come to life.

haole
05-30-2010, 03:14 PM
The Harmony completely split up both sides, the neck snapped off, and the plastic fretboard cracked. I just used regular wood glue to stick it back together, because it would be cheaper for me to buy another one than to do a good job restoring it. ;) The Harmony has made a few appearances on my youtube. You can also hear the Aria baritone as a backing track on my butchering of TNC.

I'd love to get the Aria playable again without drilling any new holes, but the tuners really need to go. :(

Vic D
05-30-2010, 03:41 PM
Well with the Harmony I'd take the neck off, clamp the sides tight and patch them, rejoint the neck and replace the fretboard completely... then try to blend the finish somehow or refinish. Wouldn't take but a weeks work what with waiting on the finish to cure. Yeah that could run some bucks. Wth tuners on the aria that's easy if you can take one out and closely measure it, since there's no documentation on the net for these tuners one would need exact measurements.

Just call Frank Ford lol... he'll fix you up. In the meantime try to find out what type of tuners those are and what size. Then others will jump right in I'm sure.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
05-30-2010, 06:16 PM
: What are the measurements of the Grover Sta-Tites for ukes?

Grover doesn't make ukulele specific tuners for a slotted headstock. The Grover Sta-Tites (made for guitars) are the ones you need, the Waverly clones. Part #H97-18GA. They are an excellent tuner.

Vic D
05-30-2010, 06:27 PM
see there, I knew someone with knowledge would intervene... wassup Chuck! Chuck is like the master.. what he says is golden... get that tuner and play that motha.

Heheheh, I'z drunker than a bicycle when I wrote this. But it's still true.

haole
05-31-2010, 03:28 PM
Grover doesn't make ukulele specific tuners for a slotted headstock. The Grover Sta-Tites (made for guitars) are the ones you need, the Waverly clones. Part #H97-18GA. They are an excellent tuner.

Fantastic! This is exactly what I needed. Thank you, Chuck!

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
05-31-2010, 06:25 PM
Keep in mind that the finished headstock needs to be a fat 3/4" thick. Any thinner and you'll be making a new head stock. I always a bit over sized to begin with. After the neck is roughed out I make make slots first, then glue on the overlay, and the last thing I do is is bring the back of the head stock to the final thickness. Also drill your post holes 1/64" bigger than 1/4" (33/64"), you're finish will make up the difference. Oh, and drill those post holes before you cut your slots out...... You'll get a cleaner bore.
Good luck.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
06-01-2010, 06:49 AM
Here's what the Sta-Tites look like installed.

fahrner
06-01-2010, 08:13 AM
Does that little gecko come with the tuners?
Beautiful work Chuck.

luvzmocha
06-01-2010, 10:39 AM
Here's what the Sta-Tites look like installed.

Beautiful work Mr. Moore. May I ask how thick the ebony veneer is on the headstock, and do you use the same thickness on a non slotted headstock?

Thanks,

George

Matt Clara
06-01-2010, 12:21 PM
Beautiful work Mr. Moore. May I ask how thick the ebony veneer is on the headstock, and do you use the same thickness on a non slotted headstock?

Thanks,

George

Let me guess! The veneer is no thicker than the slots reveal (3/32?), but the headstock is bound with ebony, giving it the impression of being thicker.
Did I win the uke???
;)

Flyfish57
06-01-2010, 05:33 PM
Elegant headstock Chuck!! This one looks like it was bound a little different than the one you shipped to Cambridge...

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
06-01-2010, 05:50 PM
Elegant headstock Chuck!! This one looks like it was bound a little different than the one you shipped to Cambridge...

I just finished this one over the weekend and I think it's the same as the ones you saw. It's probably the angle of the shot that makes it look different.

George, I never really measure the thickness of my head caps, but Matt is right on all counts. I think they must be about .090" thick and then bound to match the body. The veneer really only needs to be thick enough to give adequate support to the nut.

Aloha
06-20-2010, 02:47 PM
Keep in mind that the finished headstock needs to be a fat 3/4" thick. Any thinner and you'll be making a new head stock. I always a bit over sized to begin with. After the neck is roughed out I make make slots first, then glue on the overlay, and the last thing I do is is bring the back of the head stock to the final thickness. Also drill your post holes 1/64" bigger than 1/4" (33/64"), you're finish will make up the difference. Oh, and drill those post holes before you cut your slots out...... You'll get a cleaner bore.
Good luck.

Chuck,
Are you sure about the hole size? 33/64" is almost a half an inch. I believe the specs on the tuners are 15/64" plus your extra 1/64" would be a 1/4' inch hole??