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View Full Version : Grizzly Uke kit build...please be kind!



Mission Guitars
06-12-2010, 03:58 PM
Ok, so it's more of a "paint and glue together" :lol:

Anyway, I was on Grizzly's site looking for router bits when, for some reason, their uke kit pops up as a "things you might like" link. Well, having been to Hawaii a number of times, and having a couple of beers in me, I was now the proud owner of a $20 uke kit...

For a complete documentary of the build, see my link here: http://www.reranch.com/reranch/viewtopic.php?t=37010&highlight=

When all was said and done, this is what I was left with:

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b43/missionguitars/Uke%20Build/June2010JeepSiennaUkepics016.jpg

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b43/missionguitars/Uke%20Build/June2010JeepSiennaUkepics019.jpg

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b43/missionguitars/Uke%20Build/June2010JeepSiennaUkepics022.jpg

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b43/missionguitars/Uke%20Build/June2010JeepSiennaUkepics025.jpg

Yep, there are a couple sand-throughs I need to fix, but all in all I'm ok with it. Needs another layer of Tru-oil on the bridge as well, also a set of real strings, a good set-up, and I suspect new tuners...these peg-ones are a touch on the cheap side...

I will say I am very happy with the look of dark grain filler on mahogany with the orange stain over it, seems to approximate the "faux-koa"-look I was striving for...

Comments & criticisms are welcomed, hope to be a long-standing contributor to the forum!

- Anthony

Pondoro
06-12-2010, 04:11 PM
Beautiful finish, how does it sound?

mm stan
06-12-2010, 04:20 PM
Aloha Anthony,
Beautiful gloss finish, nice stain job too!!Did you buff the finish to get that mirror finish?? what brand of clear coat finish did you use???
Nice job, something to be real proud of. You're sorta of a good craftman, do you think of continueing in this venue???Anyways enjoy
the fruits of your labor. Thanks for sharing with all of us. "Keep them strings Vibratong" Uke On!!!!

salukulady
06-12-2010, 04:22 PM
That's the prettiest $20 uke I've ever seen. Beautiful work.

Mission Guitars
06-12-2010, 04:34 PM
It actually sounds pretty vibrant, all considering...I used Behlen's Nitrocellulose Clear Gloss lacquer (also available at Grizzly) in a spray can and built up the coat over a couple days of spraying...about 12 coats total. After a month of cure time, I then wetsanded with 800, 1000, 1200, 1500 and then 2000 grit sandpaper, then used 3M rubbing compound, machine polish, then Maguier's Scratch X to buff it out...

Steve vanPelt
06-12-2010, 06:58 PM
Be Kind?!?! That thing is out of this world. Beautiful finish!

fahrner
06-12-2010, 07:40 PM
Beautiful job on the finish. Nice work all around.
How do you feel about the neck joint? Is it just glued (no biscuits or dowels)? Will it hold up?
It's pretty amazing what you did with a twenty dollar kit. Good job!

mm stan
06-12-2010, 08:55 PM
Aloha Anthony,
Mahalo's for response, Whew..twelve coats clear and all the way to 2000 wet sanding...then compound, polish, and buff. I knew from the mirror
finish that it was a lenghty process to get that results, well well worth it for sure. You've got alot of skills and patience, will this prompt a regular
gig or on the side hobbist. I appriciate all the info and process that you shared with us. Jus can't wait for you new project with better materials.
Until next time, take care Tony....."Keep um strings vibrating" Uke On!!!!

Mission Guitars
06-13-2010, 05:44 AM
Yep, just Tightbond holding that neck on...as long as I only use nylon strings, I think I'm fine, the tension doesn't seem to be overly-staggering, so we'll see how it behaves in the coming (hopefully!) years...

As for all the laquer, about half of it got sanded off when wet-sanding it...unfortunately there are a couple spots where the grain shows still :( but mahogany is usually kind of hard to grainfill...

I'd love to make them on a regular basis, but the full-time job, wife, 3 kids kind of get in the way... :) I also make electric guitars for fun on the side, as well as sell parts to supplement the income, so it might be a while until I make another...I will say the Grizzly kit isn't bad as a platform, but next time I'll only use the body, neck & bridge, then drop another $50 or so on a nice fretboard, tuners, & nut...

Mahalo everyone for the kind words! :)

Doug W
06-13-2010, 07:43 AM
I have seen some reviews of the Grizzly kit that were less than overwhelming. I didn't realize until reading your post and checking into it more that the Grizzly is only a $22 (+shipping) kit. You did such a beautiful job of putting it together that I ordered one today.

I will attempt to be as patient as you were in doing the finish.

Thanks for sharing.

Dusepo
06-13-2010, 11:18 AM
Very nicely done job! You should be proud!

Keef
06-13-2010, 04:12 PM
Any time you finish a project that is something to be proud of not everyone achieves the checkered flag
also sometimes perfectionists never finish a job because it's not perfect (how could it be?) :)
you have not only finished but it is VERY nice
Great job !

Ken W
06-13-2010, 06:46 PM
Ditto Keef's comments. I sometimes have to remind myself that "done is good." I learn too much from finishing the first and moving on to the second to spend forever trying to get the first perfect. I'm not sure that makes sense, but I think it's sometimes best to just say, "Next!"

Oneslypig
06-15-2010, 09:13 PM
I was on the edge about picking up one of these kits, but now I'm going for it. So long as I know what's possible, I can only blame myself! Ordered!

Doug W
06-18-2010, 12:29 PM
After a month of cure time, I then wetsanded with 800, 1000, 1200, 1500 and then 2000 grit sandpaper, then used 3M rubbing compound, machine polish, then Maguier's Scratch X to buff it out...
So in my new full time occupation of trying to be just like you, I ordered a Grizzly kit which arrived yesterday. My question is when you say "a month of cure time", did you mean that you left it hanging up - you didn't touch it for a month? Is that necessary?

Thanks,
Doug

Steve vanPelt
06-18-2010, 12:48 PM
So in my new full time occupation of trying to be just like you, I ordered a Grizzly kit which arrived yesterday. My question is when you say "a month of cure time", did you mean that you left it hanging up - you didn't touch it for a month? Is that necessary?

Thanks,
Doug


..........yup

rayan
06-18-2010, 02:06 PM
I'm working on a grizzly kit. mine looks no where near as good as that one... must have got a defect :P

Uncle-Taco
06-18-2010, 04:19 PM
That is a striking finish! Pretty little uke!

rogue_wave
06-18-2010, 04:20 PM
Thanks for sharing! Beautiful finish on that ukulele. I've been curious about the Grizzly kits myself. Yours is the nicest I've seen yet. Congratulations. And welcome to the ukulele.

Apparently the step-up kit wise is from stewmac.com
http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Kits/Ukulele_Kits/Soprano_Ukulele_Kit.html?actn=100101&xst=3&xsr=340

I keep feeling like I just don't have the patience bandwidth to build either of these well. So for now, I'm a buyer, not a builder. Very impressive.

Oneslypig
06-18-2010, 04:39 PM
That is a striking finish! Pretty little uke!

Agreed! The finish sets it miles away from any of the other grizzly builds I've seen. Anthony, if you don't mind my asking, do you have any links to the grain filler you used? My grizzly kit is supposed to get here Monday and i imagine I'll be jumping on the finish process soon(that month long waiting period is a killer).

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
06-18-2010, 05:04 PM
(that month long waiting period is a killer).
You build your second uke while the finish in the first one is curing.... :)

Depending upon the filler you use, your environmental conditions, the results you expect, and how anxious you are, you can start sanding and buffing in a week. Two weeks is better. A month is better yet. Two months if you're using an organic or filler and your conditions don't promote drying.
There are some tricks you can use to hasten the drying process. One is to scuff or lightly sand your top coat the day after you've applied your last finish coat. The idea is that with the "skin" removed the finish is able to gas-off the solvents faster. The other thing you can do is to make sure to hang it in a dry place. Some builders will have a dry box equipped with a light bulb/ fan built especially for this purpose.
Just my experience.

Oh, and great looking uke MG!

Mission Guitars
06-18-2010, 07:26 PM
Wow, more responses - thanks for the additional kudos! :)

As for grain filler, I used an oil-based variety called Bartley's (dark)...they don't make it anymore as the manufacturer (McFaddins) went belly-up :( but if you live near a Rockler (or any other decent woodworking store), tell them you need "dark oil-based grain filler" and they should have something equivalent to it in stock...

As for how I did the actual painting/assembly (I would hardly call it "building" :)), click on the build link in my first post...most of the info is there...the one thing I really need to emphasize is "patience"...this stuff is 99% prep, which is mostly sanding...I missed a couple small spots with the grain filler which looks obvious to me, but the camera can't pick up...so you'll always think "geez - I coulda done better!"...but the secret is to just leave the small stuff alone, as no one else will notice - only you! You just have to be able to "deal with it" if you're anal retentive (like yours truly!)

As for my "technique", the place I learned how to finish instruments is here: http://www.reranch.com/basics.htm

Basically, it's block sand down to 400 grit until the perfectly flat, blow off dust/wipe down with lighter fluid ("naptha"), use the grain filler mentioned above, let set for 10 minutes, then scrape off excess across grain with an old credit card or equivalent. Let dry overnight, then block sand down to 400 grit (always sand WITH the grain!), blow off/wipe down with naptha & repeat the whole grain filling process a second time (I know - overkill - but it WILL be worth it!).

Now you need to decide whether you want to assemble the uke first, then spray, OR spray the parts THEN assemble...I assembled first and then sprayed, and to be honest, I wish I had finished the parts separately as wetsanding was a real bear with it all together...you just have to make sure to tape off the areas you don't want finish on, like under the fretboard, the nut area, the bridge area, and where the neck gets glued to the body...

Now that we're all nice & grainfilled, we need to lat down some sand & sealer (like this: http://reranchstore.stores.yahoo.net/sanandsealar.html) to get a good barrier between the wood & the paint. Spray, let dry a day, block sand down to 400 grit, and repeat.

Now we need to paint and/or stain. I primed the neck (http://reranchstore.stores.yahoo.net/whitlacbaspr.html), sanded to 400 after letting it dry overnight, then used nitrocellulose Fender Blonde on the neck (http://reranchstore.stores.yahoo.net/butblon.html) until the grain was completely covered. ReRanch (Gretsch) Orange was used on the body (no primer here!), about 2 coats worth (http://reranchstore.stores.yahoo.net/reranchorange.html).

No mater what, do NOT sand the color coats, unless you have a HORRENDOUS flaw! Nitrocellulose lacquer melts into each previous coat, so if there is a small run/sag, don't worry - it will be handled in the final sanding.

Now is the time to clear coat the parts, I use this (http://reranchstore.stores.yahoo.net/nitclearcoat.html), but Grizzly also has almost the same stuff for a bit less (http://www.grizzly.com/products/Top-Coat-Lacquer-Gloss/H3936)...essentially, follow the "Rule of 3's" from the ReRanch Finishing 101 site...that means go slow & lightly! It will probably take a couple days to build up a nice clear coat that you will knock down to a glossy finish.

As for the bridge finish, I used something for gunstocks called Tru Oil (http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0059398212448a&type=product&cmCat=froogle&cm_ven=data_feed&cm_cat=froogle&cm_pla=1240301&cm_ite=0059398212448a) - a little goes a LONG way. Just follow the instructions (apply with a cloth, etc.), and let dry for a day or 2. Don't get it on your hands - it's a bear to get off...

The most important part I forgot to mention is nitro lacquer is HIGHLY toxic...spray outdoors, and make sure you have a NiOsh-approved mask, like a 3M 6001/5P71/P95 unit that's available at Home Depot...do NOT skimp on this, buy a 3M unit or better!!!

You might also want a can of blush remover if you are in a windy or moist climate (http://reranchstore.stores.yahoo.net/blusblusrem.html)...this will let any moisture out of your finish that get trapped in there, resulting in a hazy, milk-like tone...if that happens, hit it with a VERY light coat of this and stop spraying for the day...it should resolve itself within a few minutes, but be patient and wait until the next day to spray again...

Now...wait...the longer the better...30 days is good, unless you have a special light/vent system like Chuck, but if this is your first finish, just hang the uke pieces in your garage and wait the 30 days (in the mean time, start another...:))...once that's done, start wetsanding...use high quality auto finish sandpaper like this http://reranchstore.stores.yahoo.net/fingradsanpa.html and follow the ReRanch 101 instructions, starting at 600 grit if the finish is rough (called "orange peel"), or start with 1000 if it's glossy (you're already halfway there!). Use a block, like a gum eraser, behind the paper, and sand evenly across the finish - you don't want a "sand through" at this point...

When you don't have ANY orange peel left, move to the next highest grit, and so on until you hit 2000. Then you move on to rubbing compound, 3M's Finesse It II (http://reranchstore.stores.yahoo.net/finitiipolco.html), then Maguier's Scratch X (available at most car stores) - you SHOULD be done now, and ready to assemble.

If you haven't removed the tape, do it now. I would actually recommend replacing the tape regularly, as the stuff will leave residue behind that's a bear to remove - I use 3M Green painter's tape, but some folks just plain old masking tape...I would pay up for the 3M product...

I use Tightbond (original) to glue, as it doesn't let you part shift after you clamp, like Tightbond II does. Even better would be horse hide glue, but that's a royal pain to get together (you need a double boiler)...use a strap clap like in my original link...then glue on the fretboard, using at least 3-4 clamps...it really need to be in the right place, or the whole project will be thrown off...then it's bridge-time...glue that down now (this stuff is all in the instrux that come with the uke kit).

Phew!

Ok, now what? The action is WAY high, still working on that with the jeweler's files (on the nut) and a sanding block (on the bridge), but it's coming along still...

Lemme know if there are any more questions, hope that helps!!!

Doug W
06-19-2010, 05:37 AM
MBH,

You build your second uke while the finish in the first one is curing....

This will be a test to see if I am patient enough to go through with the whole thing. I have a couple of other ukes I have picked up over the years from rummage sales that have intonation problems. I can start the Grizzly and then go to work on them.

MG,

Thanks I will refer to this thread as I move through the process.


Thanks

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
06-19-2010, 06:59 AM
There are lots of different finishing schedules out there, some easy while others are more complex, and they all agree to a certain extent depending upon what you are expecting.
One thing I can say with certainty. How good your finish is depends upon everything you do up to the moment you spray your first coat of finish. They type of grain filler and the method of application is critical. I think I've tried every grain filler out there, oil based, water based, acrylic based, super glues, epoxies, drywall mud, scrambled eggs. Two or three applications with any filler seems to be adequate; you'll never get the job done with one. These all look good to some extent when the instrument is just finished, but it's heart breaking to see the shrink-back in a month or a year. For a mirror like finish, CA or epoxy can't be beat IMO, but they can be troublesome to work with.

Mission Guitars
06-19-2010, 03:54 PM
One thing I can say with certainty. How good your finish is depends upon everything you do up to the moment you spray your first coat of finish. They type of grain filler and the method of application is critical. I think I've tried every grain filler out there, oil based, water based, acrylic based, super glues, epoxies, drywall mud, scrambled eggs. Two or three applications with any filler seems to be adequate; you'll never get the job done with one. These all look good to some extent when the instrument is just finished, but it's heart breaking to see the shrink-back in a month or a year. For a mirror like finish, CA or epoxy can't be beat IMO, but they can be troublesome to work with.

+1 across the board! I'm looking to use epoxy soon, but due to my schedule (I only have maybe 30 minutes tops to work on my builds at a time), I'm stuck with the more conventional techniques...can't afford to get a third of the way through grain-filling and then have to leave a glob of activated epoxy square in the middle of the uke body!

Vic D
06-19-2010, 06:20 PM
Right on Chuck. 90% of the finish is in the prep work. I did a couple of years sanding and prepping cars, a year of that was for one of those "economy" auto paint shops. You can usually tell a car has been painted at an economy shop by the 180 sanding swirls in the paint... not mine though, all it took was to go over the cars with a scuff pad after hitting them with the 180 and they came out "slick as snot" as they say in the business. I sanded and prepped 8 cars a day or better, lost 30 pounds and gained lots of popped out veins, which my wife thinks is gross heh. I'm gonna use up this pint of Colortone filler I have then I'll switch to epoxy. I had a uke that should have been a 150 dollar uke turn into a 60 dollar uke because, among other things, I tried to do the grain filler in one shot. I know now it'll probably take three shots of this stuff to make it golden. Probably two with the epoxy it seems.

Doug W
07-03-2010, 05:04 AM
but it's heart breaking to see the shrink-back in a month or a year.
Can you explain the term "shrink-back"? My daughter and I are on the way to the hardware store for sandpaper. Time to get started.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
07-03-2010, 07:06 AM
Pores that shrink back are those that "seem" to be filled at the beginning of the process, only to continue to shrink during the drying of the instrument' finish. All the mineral, naptha, oil, and water based pore fillers that I've tried will all shrink back to some extent. The shrink back with ca glues and epoxy fillers is minimal compared to the rest. Lacquer will continue to shrink over the period of a year or so and make these pores even more evident. In the worst cases, after a year it looks like you've used no pore filler at all.
I honestly don't understand the obsession with pore free mirror finishes. I do them but I hate that it's demanded of my work! What's wrong with admitting that we work with a natural material? Are pores really an imperfection? I'd rather my own personal instruments look like wood than plastic. Don't get me wrong, I want my pores to be filled because I like the reflective quality of the finish, but I'd also be willing to settle for some slight shrink back after time. The only true mirror, glasslike, pore free finishes I've seen have been either way too thick or post-cat poly finishes that have that "dipped in plastic" look. I'd rather go thin with a more natural look. Unfortunately the market determines much of what we do.

Doug W
07-03-2010, 07:29 AM
Thanks for that response. Now I have to debate with myself on the issue of filling or not.

Another very basic question about woodworking...The only woodworking that I have done in the past is putting crude workbenches together and finishing pieces of furniture picked up at rummage sales.
I just finished, (I thought), sanding the Grizzly neck and body with 180, 240 and 320 sandpaper per the instructions. After sanding, I wiped the surface off with a cloth and caught a few snags-tiny little wood hairs sticking up. I am not sure that more sanding will take those down - or maybe it will...??
So the question is: Do I need to sand more or will this all be taken care of in the finishing process?

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
07-03-2010, 08:05 AM
I sand bare wood to 220, sometimes up to 400.
Pore filling will give you the best finish by far. At least one coat, if not two. I just don't know how anal I would get about it. As I mentioned before, all of my instrument by necessity (demand) are pore filled and finished to a high gloss mirror finish. However if I was finishing an uke just for myself, I wouldn't mind backing off of that a bit and seeing some shrink back. I like knowing that it's wood.

Doug W
07-03-2010, 08:43 AM
Since I have 1 kit and 2 old ukes to practice on, maybe I will try to go overboard on the Grizzly and back off on the other 2.

Thanks for the advice

mzuch
07-03-2010, 04:43 PM
After sanding, I wiped the surface off with a cloth and caught a few snags-tiny little wood hairs sticking up. I am not sure that more sanding will take those down - or maybe it will...??

Was the cloth damp? If so, you may have raised the grain on the mahogany, which is a good thing to do before applying finish. Light sanding will eliminate the "hairs."

Doug W
07-03-2010, 05:27 PM
The cloth was not damp. I will try some 400 grit sandpaper next.

you may have raised the grain on the mahogany, which is a good thing to do before applying finish
Not being familiar with the term "raise the grain" I searched on Google and found the instructions for the Stewart MacDonald uke kit with an explaination. I will try the technique on the Grizzly kit.

Thanks for bringing it up.

Mission Guitars
07-03-2010, 08:09 PM
FWIW, my "glass-like finish" actually has a little grain showing...mahogany is tough to grain fill!

GrumpyOldMan
07-03-2010, 09:44 PM
I think I've tried every grain filler out there, oil based, water based, acrylic based, super glues, epoxies, drywall mud, scrambled eggs.
I take it you were yolking about the scrambled eggs.
Okay, I'll make my eggsit now.
Ian.

dave g
07-09-2010, 08:52 AM
I honestly don't understand the obsession with pore free mirror finishes.

Me neither. Wooden things are, after all, made of wood, which has pores in it :)

Mission Guitars
07-09-2010, 10:47 AM
I take it you were yolking about the scrambled eggs.
Okay, I'll make my eggsit now.
Ian.

Believe it or not, egg whites alledgedly work pretty well as a filler, proving grain filling is not an eggact science!

Ok ok... :)

Doug W
08-09-2010, 03:19 PM
...I assembled first and then sprayed, and to be honest, I wish I had finished the parts separately as wetsanding was a real bear with it all together...you just have to make sure to tape off the areas you don't want finish on, like under the fretboard, the nut area, the bridge area, and where the neck gets glued to the body...

Couldn't let the thread die with a painful pun so I thought I would ask a question. The neck and body of your Grizzly are different finishes. If you were doing the same finish on the neck and body, would you still recommend finishing the parts individually and then gluing?

UkeforJC
08-28-2010, 07:25 PM
Hi! Everyone,
I just have a question.
When we apply the filler, will it affect the sound at all?
I am just wondering...
Thank you for your responses.

Ukulele Friend
08-29-2010, 12:14 AM
Aloha Mission Guitars,

I agree with Stan. How in the world did you pull this off. The stain is absolutely gorgeous and the finish not one commonly seen on a $20 uke kit that's for sure. Great job. I can only imagine what the end result would be like if you had a build kit with some premium koa...

Mahalo for sharing,
Shawn

http://ukulelefriend.com

Mission Guitars
08-29-2010, 05:13 PM
Couldn't let the thread die with a painful pun so I thought I would ask a question. The neck and body of your Grizzly are different finishes. If you were doing the same finish on the neck and body, would you still recommend finishing the parts individually and then gluing?

I would not...I just couldn't finish the neck in a stain/clear, as the wood was HORRIBLE...it's just that getting a good line between orange stain and Fender Blonde paint is next to impossible (there's a reason for binding on Les Paul & PRS guitars that have a solid color top and stained back!)...so, in a word or 2, I would assemble first, and THEN paint if you are doing one color...

As for filling the grain pores affecting tone, yes, I'm sure it does, but then again, so will any finish you put on the uke...as long as you keep it thin, you should keep an optimal balance between protecting the wood, and allow the wood to sing...

A couple months after finishing this thing, it still sounds great, and my kids have yet to ding it even though they mess with it more than I!

UkeforJC
08-31-2010, 06:24 PM
Hi! Everyone,
I am just wondering which brand of sandpaper will you recommend.
Does it matter?

Is it necessary to get the 3M Gold Fre-cut sandpaper like the one sold in Stew-mac? or any kind is fine as long as I use 180, 240, 320 grit dry sandpaper.
Does the material have to be aluminum oxide or can it be other kind, like silicon carbide?

Thank you for your information.

Mission Guitars
09-08-2010, 08:19 AM
Hi! Everyone,
I am just wondering which brand of sandpaper will you recommend. Does it matter?

Is it necessary to get the 3M Gold Fre-cut sandpaper like the one sold in Stew-mac? or any kind is fine as long as I use 180, 240, 320 grit dry sandpaper.
Does the material have to be aluminum oxide or can it be other kind, like silicon carbide?

Doesn't really matter, as long as it can withstand being soaked in water for hours at a time...that usually means a higher-end (usually 3M) aluminum oxide product...if you are looking for something less expensive, you might want to look for an online auto paint supply house as it's usually the same stuff you'd wetsand a car with...and FWIW, grits 180 to 320 have no business in wetsanding a finish, I would only use something as rough as 400 if the orange peel was REALLY bad, but in general I start at 800 and finish at 2000...YMMV...

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
09-08-2010, 08:30 AM
I think there is a world of difference in wet sanding papers. I have found Mirka wet papers to be far superior than any others for sanding finishes. Absolutely non loading, non pilling and lasts forever. For dry paper for use on wood I like the Norton 3X papers for the same reasons. I also use Abranet with my obital sander. Good sanding papers aren't cheap but they're worth it.

UkeforJC
09-08-2010, 07:42 PM
Thank you MG, Chuck for sharing the experience.
I have another question. Like I wrote in my other thread, how do you measure the center of the body.
I am trying to find out the right position for the bridge, but I just have no idea what is the proper way to do it.
Thank you very much.

Mission Guitars
09-18-2010, 08:20 PM
Thank you MG, Chuck for sharing the experience.
I have another question. Like I wrote in my other thread, how do you measure the center of the body.
I am trying to find out the right position for the bridge, but I just have no idea what is the proper way to do it.
Thank you very much.

Completely late to the party, but I use the fishing line along the "outside 2 nutslots to the outside 2 bridge slots"-method...this is for a guitar I made, but you get the idea...

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b43/missionguitars/Mary%20Kay%20Star/November2007005.jpg

Here's me measuring for bridge placement...

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b43/missionguitars/Uke%20Build/November2009BlueStratFirdbirdCha-5.jpg

Once you're done with both of these, measure again about 500 times, then glue & clamp...I prefer a strap clamp...YMMV...

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b43/missionguitars/Uke%20Build/November2009BlueStratFirdbirdCha-9.jpg

UkeforJC
09-18-2010, 09:11 PM
Thank you MG.
These pictures help a lot.

PhilUSAFRet
02-19-2011, 03:38 AM
Wow, beautiful job. Thanks for the "orange stain" idea. I was searching for a koa kind of color for my new Grizzly kit. Thank you.