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sharp21
07-16-2010, 05:58 AM
I am going to be building a small wood working shop next summer & want to start start getting some tools in place to put in it! What should I be looking to get first? My only woodworking tool I have right now is a jigsaw....

I'm going to start with a kit but would eventually like to be re-sawing my own wood & build right from scratch.

S.

Doc_J
07-16-2010, 06:30 AM
Check out Kathy Matsushita's amateur luthier site. It is excellent for that kind of info.
She has several tool lists.
http://home.comcast.net/~kathymatsushita/

fahrner
07-16-2010, 08:08 AM
Most folks that provide uke kits also provide recommended tool lists.
http://www.hanalima.com/tooltips.shtml
http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Kits/Ukulele_Kits/Tenor_Ukulele_Kit.html?tab=Instructions#details
Also recommend the Pete Howlett video series and the Dave G (Waverly) videos for more advanced tool recommendations on YouTube.
http://petehowlettukulele.co.uk/
http://www.wsukes.com/plans.html
My advice is; instead of building a work shop, build a uke kit. The rest will follow. There are some fine ukes being built on kitchen tables. (not a recommendation but you see my point).

hoosierhiver
07-16-2010, 08:34 AM
Be sure to get a worktable that is a comfortable height.

Depending upon your budget, Grizzly sells a few that are nice with alot of drawers.
http://grizzly.com/products/H7724

fahrner
07-16-2010, 08:54 AM
Be sure to get a worktable that is a comfortable height.

Depending upon your budget, Grizzly sells a few that are nice with alot of drawers.
http://grizzly.com/products/H7724
I bought one of those a few years back when they carried them at the local CostCo.
Different drawer configuration but what a great bench, especially for the money.

lindydanny
07-16-2010, 10:03 AM
Wood shop or Luthier shop?

If it is just a wood shop, then check out Popularwoodworking.com. They have a section called "I Can Do That" which includes a guide to setting up shop. The guide and tool list was developed mostly by Chris Schwartz who is one of the best woodworkers in the states.

A couple of tips to give you as you get started:
- Try to master hand tools first. It will make it easier to use power tools later.
- Don't run out and buy a table saw first thing. You will not buy what you need and will be unhappy (and probably hurt) later.
- When you do buy tools, spend money. Cheap tools are cheap for a reason.
- Lastly: Buy good wood. It ruins a project from the get go if you buy ugly wood that is hard to work with.

~DB

P.S.: Another good site with lots of support and a great community is Lumberjocks.com.

sharp21
07-16-2010, 11:06 PM
I've got a reasonable bit of space now, with a nice bench & whatnot, but we are going to be moving to a new place next summer. It doesn't have a shop so I'll be building one.

It will be a general workshop, slightly slanted to lutherie. I checked out that popularwoodworking article. Pretty interesting! I've also been researching small shops built into a 10x20 foot space. I'll be using it for general household woodworking & repairs, & for building ukes! I'd like to get it laid out nice & compact but very workable.

Good advice on the table saw; that was the first one I was looking at getting!

I'm going to start building from kits though right away. Start accumulating the small hand tools needed. I've got a Grizzly kit on the way & will move to a StewMac after that.

S.

SweetWaterBlue
07-17-2010, 02:52 AM
Some of us with small shops, and especially those who like to use hand tools, don't think a 10x20 foot space can be characterized as small lol.

lindydanny
07-17-2010, 02:57 AM
Yeah, I think mine is something like 15x17 with low ceilings (7'5") and I build some pretty big stuff.

Let us know how it all comes together!

~DB

Matt Clara
07-17-2010, 04:04 AM
Check this search out (http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/search.php?searchid=693919).

sharp21
07-17-2010, 04:52 AM
Yeah, I think mine is something like 15x17 with low ceilings (7'5") and I build some pretty big stuff.

Let us know how it all comes together!

~DB

Thats still 55 sq/ft bigger than I was planning! I just figured I would tack another 10 feet onto the end of the garage, hence the 10x20...

I tried that search but it didn't return any results... But I checked out your website & really like the night shots!

S.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
07-17-2010, 07:47 AM
My advice is to put everything you can on wheels. That way they can be moved aside when not in use. Make sure the casters have brakes on them. My wheeled equipment includes one table saw, two bandsaws, a spindle sander, a belt sander, a drum sander, two air compressors, dust collector and one large rolling work table. Even my tall work stools are on wheels. My drill press is fixed as well as two large work benches. I have dust collection ports spaced about every eight feet around the shop that will accept any tool I choose to plug into.
I like an open feeling in my shop so I installed two eight foot wide bay doors at either end of one wall that opens out to a 40' X 8' deck. I live in an area where the weather is pleasant most of the time so I am able to do some of the rough work outside if I wish. I can wheel the bandsaw or drum sander out onto the deck to handle large boards.
You mentioned wanting to do general woodworking as well. The deck is a good place to work with sheet goods, plywood and such and good for spraying furniture etc.

sharp21
07-17-2010, 08:45 PM
I just finished reading the eBook from Popular Woodworking & it was pretty interesting. I AM going to put everything on a rolling base & I think I will build each of those bases myself. I want to construct everything in the shop, from the workbench, to the cabinets, to the jigs, to the ukes!

By the time I'm done setting it up I should be well practiced
S.

Timbuck
07-17-2010, 10:39 PM
Beware of TAS...I got it so bad that I have no more room left in the workshop:mad:..and I sometimes have to work outside..to get away from the clutter..it's time I had a Sale of "Not really needed but come in handy " Tools:D

Brido
07-18-2010, 12:59 AM
1. Bandsaw. Cant live without it. If you have the room and the money get a large 2 wheel version. They do take up a chunk of room but my shop is only 3 meters by 2 meters and it gets in the way sometimes, but I love it.
2. Next would be a fixed belt sander.
3. Japanese saw (fine tooth) Just so easy to use once you get used to it and so accurate.
4. Set of good wood chisels and learn how to sharpen them.

I can be persuaded to alter the order of my list but not the bandsaw as No. 1.

Vic D
07-18-2010, 05:31 PM
Haven't read through all of the posts but, knowing what I know now I wish I had taken advice given on countless forums and picked up a 14 inch or better bandsaw instead of a 12. The 12" Delta I have is ok for sopanos and maybe concerts but I'm gonna have trouble with tenors. Two other things I wouldn't want to do without, a thickness sander and youtube videos and pages and pages of information dealing with the possible dangers and safety procedures of power tools. Also, all the youtube videos and websites on lutherie and ukulele building. Kathy's site is great. I read and stored about a gig of lutherie info over the years, the net is a virtual luthier's school today. A lot of these cats could make a few bucks selling their knowledge but they give it freely, that's a good sign things are gonna be.... alright...
Start buying clamps now.
I got an older but barely used craftsman benchtop belt sander I absolutely love it for shaping stuff, especially bracing, picked it up for a song.
Nice scrapers are excellent for certain jobs.
Fret crowning file is a must have, along with nut slotting files.
Japanese saw is pretty much a must have.
Stewmac or LMI fret slotting saw blad and templates are wonderful to have.
Router and table and some sort of binding router jig with a trim router ( I made my own for like 30 bucks using drawer slides, including a harbor freght trim router and it works perfect).
Block plane, mini planes, nice chisels (don't have but one but will probably add many), spokeshave... there's a rasp from Lowe's it's about 7 inches long, double sided flat and convex with both fine and course... I love that thing for shaping soprano necks... n stuff. Probably move to a spokeshave in the future but I dunno.
Man I could be here all night. Visit Kathy's site.

sharp21
07-18-2010, 08:21 PM
I've been all over Kathy's site. Her updated shop build is actually what got me thinking about how to set up my next one!

What kind of workbench is everyone using? Does it have a shoulder & end vice, or any interesting features? I'll be scratch building one & am thinking of building it & the rolling tool stands at complementary heights so that I can but them up to the end of the bench & it will be level with the work surface. Good for ripping long pieces on the chop saw for example, or having room to work around the bandsaw. A full size bandsaw!

A thickness sander is different than a planer correct? What about using the Luthiers Friend for thickness sanding (http://www.luthiersfriend.com/)?

S.

Ken W
07-19-2010, 02:56 AM
The Luthier's Friend is fine for thicknessing small parts but you'll need a way to thickness larger panels like tops and backs. You'll find folks here who use everything from handplanes to handheld belt sanders...commercially made drum sanders that cost thousands of dollars (see Performax for an example) to shop-built drum sanders that cost very little (see Timbuck's excellent post on his build of a cheap but excellent sander). I resaw my own wood on an old Delta 14" bandsaw with riser block (original 1/4 horse Delta motor...it shouldn't handle what I feed it, but it does) work it down to near final thickness with a Wagner Safe-T-Plane in my drill press (it seems that folks either love or hate the Safe-T-Plane...I love it and get great results) and then sand to final thickness with a shop-built drum sander that I made to mount on my Shopsmith (again...another machine that folks seem to love or hate). The great thing that you will find about this adventure you are on is that there are many ways to build and get good results. Study what others are doing and find your own way.

lindydanny
07-19-2010, 03:09 AM
I will say that getting good bandsaw would be a better decision if you are to build ukes than a table saw. The TS will give you some more flexibility in what you build, but that are a pain in the backside to cut book-matched parts. Plus, the band saw has a good learning curve and is fairly forgiving to your fingers (compared the the table saw).

Make sure if/when you get one that you have a good resaw capacity. Resawing is when you take a board and cut it in half thick-wise. Meaning you take a 1" board and cut it to 1/2". Anything less than a 7" resaw capacity is not adequate (I would go bigger and shoot for at least 10").

~DB

sharp21
07-19-2010, 05:37 AM
What do you think about THIS (http://reddeer.kijiji.ca/c-buy-and-sell-tools-equipment-Delta-14-Bandsaw-For-Sale-W0QQAdIdZ216775268)bandsaw? Price okay? Big enough?
S.

lindydanny
07-19-2010, 06:06 AM
That's a great saw, but the price may be a bit high for a used one. They are about that price new from Lowes (although, that may be a slight different model). Porter Cable is the brand at Lowes, but it is the same company that builds the saw.

If you are going to buy new (which isn't bad), go with a Grizzly (http://www.grizzly.com/products/category.aspx?key=420000). I've had my eye on the G0555 (http://www.grizzly.com/products/The-Ultimate-14-Bandsaw/G0555)for a while but can't quite pull the trigger on it.

If you want to go used, keep an eye out and research the cost new on anything you see. There is a terrible rash of idiots trying to sell a tool for what they paid for it. The word "used" doesn't even seem to register with these morons.

~DB

P.S.: I've got a slightly smaller version of a 14" that is about twenty years old with a cast iron body. It was a knock off of the Delta model at that time. It is a decent saw, but has a slight smaller resaw capacity than I would like. If you can find an old model Delta, then you may be in heaven. They can run around $150 to $300 depending on age, condition, and the relative a$$hole level of the person selling it. Keep your eyes peeled and I bet you'll find what you want!

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
07-19-2010, 04:04 PM
Bench height is important. I built all of my benches higher than the standard height to save me from stooping over too much. At 40" it's ideal for my height and the perfect level for the work stools (bar stools really) that I work from.

sharp21
07-19-2010, 06:11 PM
Bench height is important. I built all of my benches higher than the standard height to save me from stooping over too much. At 40" it's ideal for my height and the perfect level for the work stools (bar stools really) that I work from.

Any other special features, or just a good wood vice?
S.

thistle3585
07-20-2010, 02:35 AM
I bought a 25% coupon for Home Depot off ebay for $4.00 then took it to Lowes and used it to buy a Delta 14" bandsaw. I think I paid a little less than $400 for it. They honor other stores coupons and the manager didn't bat an eye approving it and told me that he thought I got it for less than they paid for it.

lindydanny
07-20-2010, 03:13 AM
Any other special features, or just a good wood vice?
S.

Wood vises are a good investment. Along with them, make sure the bench has dog holes that line up with the vise. That will make it easier to clamp things to the surface for tasks like planing.

Read Workbenches (http://www.amazon.com/Workbenches-Design-Construction-Popular-Woodworking/dp/1558708405/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1279631487&sr=1-1)by Christopher Schwarz. It not only will walk you though the basic deisgns and features that you can add, it also has several good designs you can follow to make your bench.

~DB

sharp21
07-20-2010, 03:28 AM
That Chris Schwarz' name keeps coming up! I've read a number of stuff from him now & he definitely seems to know his stuff.
Great idea about the coupon!
S.

Michael N.
07-20-2010, 05:02 AM
I bought a 25% coupon for Home Depot off ebay for $4.00 then took it to Lowes and used it to buy a Delta 14" bandsaw. I think I paid a little less than $400 for it. They honor other stores coupons and the manager didn't bat an eye approving it and told me that he thought I got it for less than they paid for it.

Just a word of caution. Don't ever set up as a pro. Ukulele maker using that as a business model.