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View Full Version : The build. . .unfortunately just another grizzly kit



Oneslypig
08-07-2010, 09:05 PM
Well, I started in on my Grizzly kit today. I've had it for a little over a month and just now cleared some space to work on it.

First of all, I was amazed at how quickly the time went by. I started around 7:30PM and walked in from the garage at about 11:45.

Bulk of the time was sanding. . . . . .

But that monotony was broken up by some sanding mixed in here and there.

Also, I found some time to get some sanding in.

I decided to shape the headstock a little differently and due to my impatience and terrible tools(a small hacksaw, cringe!) took a small chunk of wood in the process. I need to spend a bit more time shaping it more precisely(likely with some computer graphics help).

Got the neck glued on and decided that if I build anything ever again, I'm not doing rubber bands for clamping. The stingy part of me talked me out of getting the ratchet style clamp for the neck attachment and I am now regretting it. The biggest disadvantage I noticed seems like it would probably be present with the ratchet style as well, though. It was that the rubber bands around the bottom of the neck seem to put pressure on the neck unevenly; encouraging it to move towards the top of the uke. I rigged a couple scrap wood pieces with smaller rubber bands to flatten it out and weighted it down to try and keep the neck from creeping. I guess I'll just have to check in the morning to see if it worked.

I couldn't resist dry clamping and wetting down the top to see what it may one day look like. I was, rather obviously, not surprised, but it's fun to feel like it's a uke instead of a $25 box of wood.

Lastly, does anyone know of a good source for headstock veneer pieces in the US(preferably NW)? This whole thing is admittedly a field I know absolutely nothing about so any help would be appreciated.

Thanks

nick

Dusepo
08-07-2010, 09:47 PM
Nice! I like the headstock curve.

Oneslypig
08-07-2010, 09:50 PM
@Dusepo Ya, it needs a bit of touch up, hopefully it will turn out.

Also as an update, looks like the 'clamp'ing is going to hold.

Timbuck
08-08-2010, 12:20 AM
I hope your not going to glue the bridge on like that ;)

mzuch
08-08-2010, 06:51 AM
Headstock veneers thick enough for inlay at www.stewmac.com.
Thin decorative veneers at www.rockler.com.

Oneslypig
08-08-2010, 07:08 AM
@Timbuck absolutely not. I'll probably drop by my local woodcrafter shop(called woodcrafters. rather un-clever) and pick up an appropriately sized c-clamp.

@mzuch looking into it now. Wasn't too interested in inlay work. Only so many projects at a time.

Timbuck
08-08-2010, 07:36 AM
@Timbuck absolutely not. I'll probably drop by my local woodcrafter shop(called woodcrafters. rather un-clever) and pick up an appropriately sized c-clamp.

@mzuch looking into it now. Wasn't too interested in inlay work. Only so many projects at a time.
I was remarking on the fact that it is back to front in the pic .:D

bryanperk
08-08-2010, 07:41 AM
I was remarking on the fact that it is back to front in the pic .:D

haha Timbuck I hadn't even noticed that looking at the pic, but now that you mention it it definitely is! I think the surprising amount of grain from a $22 kit distracted me from the minor details like that

Oneslypig
08-08-2010, 11:57 AM
Haha, I didn't notice either. I'll pay a little more attention when glue is involved. :)

Swampy Steve
08-09-2010, 06:48 AM
I keep thinking about trying this build. Is this kit easy for a first time builder, or is another better?
Steve

mwaller
08-09-2010, 12:53 PM
I keep thinking about trying this build. Is this kit easy for a first time builder, or is another better?
Steve
The Grizzly kit is definitely a good place to start. Other kits, such as the StewMac soprano or tenor are significantly more expensive and require a lot more work.
However, if you have some prior wood working experience, the Grizzly kit may not provide much of a challenge. The body comes fully assembled, and the fretboard has the frets already installed. Even so, it's a great way to practice wood finishing techniques and instrument set-up.
If you want to get a bit more 'building' experience, I recommend replacing the soundboard on the Grizzly kit with solid spruce. I've built two instruments this way - one with the traditional bridge plate, and one with fan bracing. The experience taught me how bracing affects sound, and gave me an opportunity to shape and glue braces.
Mika