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roxhum
09-02-2010, 04:20 AM
I have another question: What is with the +/-? Example I just picked up a piece that has E7+5 E7 Em6. I thought maybe it meant to jump to the 5th fret but that didn't sound good. The combo sounds real pretty but I don't have a clue what the +/- chords mean. Seriously I had no idea what I didn't know and how complex the fret board is. I am always impressed with the individuals/genious that originally created the complexity of instruments.

Thanks.

Roxhum

mm stan
09-02-2010, 04:38 AM
I believe the + is dominant seventh chords with raised fifth(7th+5)
- is dominant seventh chords with lowered fifth(7th-5)
E7+5 1203
E7 1202
Em6 0102

roxhum
09-02-2010, 04:41 AM
And they said the uku was going to be easy.

Thank you very much for the explanation. It really helped and I almost understand.

seeso
09-02-2010, 07:10 AM
I believe the + is dominant seventh chords with raised fifth(7th+5)
- is dominant seventh chords with lowered fifth(7th-5)
E7+5 1203
E7 1202
Em6 0102

If you see it spelled out E7+5, then yes, it represents a dominant seventh chord with a raised fifth. However, if you see it alone, ie. E+, then it represents an augmented chord. An augmented chord has a raised fifth.

As for the "-," if you see it spelled out like mm stan has shown above, then his interpretation is correct, but usually a "-" after a chord represents minor. Musicians will sometimes write E- instead of Em to represent an E minor chord.

spots
09-02-2010, 09:13 AM
Just to throw another one into the mix...

When you see (the degree symbol), it is a diminished chord. As an example: C would be "C diminished". It contains a root chord, minor third, and a diminished fifth (a flattened fifth).

seeso
09-02-2010, 10:29 AM
Just to throw another one into the mix...

When you see (the degree symbol), it is a diminished chord. As an example: C would be "C diminished". It contains a root chord, minor third, and a diminished fifth (a flattened fifth).

Actually, when you see C, it actually means C diminished seventh, a four note chord. In the case of C, the notes would be C, Eb (minor third), Gb (diminished fifth), and A (double-flattened seventh).

If the music calls for a regular three-note diminished chord, you will usually see Cm-5 or Cmb5.

I know it makes no sense, but that's how it is.

wheelgunner
09-02-2010, 10:53 AM
And they said the uku was going to be easy.

Thank you very much for the explanation. It really helped and I almost understand.

I took Greek and Hebrew in college and I STILL don't get this music lingo! I guess that's why I just play and don't worry too much about the whys and wherefores.

spots
09-02-2010, 11:28 AM
Actually, when you see C, it actually means C diminished seventh, a four note chord. In the case of C, the notes would be C, Eb (minor third), Gb (diminished fifth), and A (double-flattened seventh).

If the music calls for a regular three-note diminished chord, you will usually see Cm-5 or Cmb5.

I know it makes no sense, but that's how it is.

Seeso,

Thank you for the detailed explanation of this as it relates to the ukulele.

I should have mentioned that my example was using a simple triad chord (three notes: root, third, and 5th), as one would use on a piano.

Brewerpaul
09-03-2010, 02:39 PM
Dude, don't sweat it too much. Learn a couple of sets of 3 chords like G,C,D7 or C,F,G7 and you can play thousands of tunes. As time goes on, you'll notice automatically that changing a note or two in those chords gives you a great sounding alternative chord. Probably one of those dim, or +/-, aug23rd, minor 6th etc. Who cares? Just have fun and experiment.

Hippie Dribble
09-03-2010, 06:30 PM
I took Greek and Hebrew in college and I STILL don't get this music lingo! I guess that's why I just play and don't worry too much about the whys and wherefores.

hey wheelgunner, now I'm TOTALLY confused. I thought that seeso and spots were talking hebrew and greek in this thread! Oh well, it's back to "Skip To My Lou" for me...

luvdat
09-04-2010, 07:14 PM
I think the biggest mistake we can make is to attempt to "understand" something that is arbitrary and in the course of time became standardized. There is in fact nothing to "understand." In short, as Seeso and others have said, it's simply the way things are. I say this not to be snide but helpful, since I myself have at times hindered my own learning (not just music) with these expectations. These things are more like elements of languages, terminologies...