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Keef
09-03-2010, 10:15 AM
We have had a guitar sitting around since the early 60's so today I picked up this giant monster and tryed to play it but only made noise so I removed two strings and retuned it as a uke in low g and tryed again no go OMG!! It's like a mile between frets :) I'll just put the steel strings back on it and put it away

philthy
09-03-2010, 10:57 AM
i did the same thing. i learned guitat on a classical cordoba. not only were the frets a mile apart, the neck width was forever wide. how did those things ever become popular? i sold it and bought a pocket uke. ahhh, that's better.

SuzukHammer
09-03-2010, 11:43 AM
I thought that if I played uke, I could possibly transfer into playing guitar.

So I have tried picking up guitars and I don't see it being possible for me to play a guitar.

cletus
09-03-2010, 11:49 AM
A former guitar player, I now have an aversion to the beasts.
The sheer weight alone....

Keef
09-03-2010, 11:52 AM
I'm thinking that if you had these http://farm1.static.flickr.com/6/68580182_3b160a5a93.jpg guitar playing wouldn't be so bad :)

kenikas
09-03-2010, 01:33 PM
Hmmm..... I still like mine

monty
09-03-2010, 01:41 PM
Hahaha nice one Keef - dont we all wish we had fingers like that sometimes.. I am also turned off the religious path of the 6-strings goliath, its currently for sale and althought I had many good times... my hands now feel sufficiently dwarven!

Lexxy
09-03-2010, 01:43 PM
Hahaha. I find it challenging to bar frets on the guitar.

Uncle-Taco
09-03-2010, 01:51 PM
Devil's playthings. Stay away from those.

jtafaro
09-03-2010, 03:35 PM
I have a nice Martin HD28-35 and I can't play it anymore either. I don't know how I ever did but that was 22years ago but I still have the guitar and it looks brand new. One day I might try again but it seems so big.

Chris Tarman
09-03-2010, 05:01 PM
We have had a guitar sitting around since the early 60's so today I picked up this giant monster and tryed to play it but only made noise so I removed two strings and retuned it as a uke in low g and tryed again no go OMG!! It's like a mile between frets :) I'll just put the steel strings back on it and put it away

I feel the same way now when I pick up my old Yamaha acoustic. Strangely though, I do NOT feel that way when I play a bass. I don't really know why the acoustic guitar feels so much more huge than a bass guitar. I guess it's just because I've played bass for 30 years now, and it feels like part of my body... and I rarely play guitar anymore. I was never very good at it anyway, lol.

olgoat52
09-03-2010, 05:50 PM
I have only been playing the uke for about 3 weeks and just yesterday pulled out the Taylor to check a chord progression I used to use a lot and man the neck felt like a baseball bat. It is amazing how fast things change.. I haven't played that much over the last 10 years but it never felt that strange when I pulled them out in the past...

cletus
09-03-2010, 06:22 PM
but it never felt that strange when I pulled them out in the past...

That's what she said.

Nelson-Fritata
09-03-2010, 08:42 PM
I started playing the guitar about 10 years ago, and the ukulele a couple of years ago and switching between the two is not a problem for me. If i had to choose between the two however, the ukulele would always win!! :D

DaveVisi
09-03-2010, 09:04 PM
I don't know what you guys are complaining about. I seem to do fine with guitars. Those big chords? Piece of cake!

http://scotthamilton.typepad.com/my_weblog/images/six_fingers_1.jpg

clayton56
09-03-2010, 10:30 PM
I still get mine out occasionally - it's only been a year and a half since I took up the uke. I don't have a problem with the fingering, but the SOUND, so bassy and thick, I sure like the light sprightly uke sound.

I have been playing the banjo more and more since taking up the uke, which is good, but there doesn't seem to be much advantage. With either one, once you go up five frets, you're in uke territory.

luvdat
09-03-2010, 11:00 PM
What I like about this thread: emphasizes how different things feel or simply new found tonal preferences.

Early on and I think this is a temptation for a lot of ukers, there's this impulse to bash guitar playing and guitarists. Yeah I did some of the same. I've come to conclude that most ukers would do better to connect with musicians who play guitar and other instruments and maybe even bring up skills in other instruments.

I played guitar for most of my life and am grateful for that foundation, and like I said in another thread, I just ordered an actual banjo...

Hippie Dribble
09-04-2010, 12:12 AM
I'm with luvdat pretty much.

My musical background is firmly with the acoustic guitar - 20 years of it. It was what I first learnt to play music on and write songs on. It gave me an outlet for all the lyrics and poetry I was writing and stopped me from going nutty. Being proficient on the guitar certainly helped me an incredible amount when I started on the uke about 4or so years back. It made the initial journey much quicker. But like any instrument, the deeper you plumb the depths, you find out how much more there is to learn. This is definately true of the ukulele - perhaps not so much with the left hand, but the many right hand strumming patterns take sooooome learning. I do admit to the little voice on my shoulder tempting me to put down guitar stuff occasionally though!!!

We should all be humble and recognise our limitations. I play often with a 12string guitar player and we have a great time. He still can't take the uke seriously but I'm winning him over by degrees.

Hmmm...banjo..a very unforgiving instrument if ever there was one!!! I've had one for a few years now but really haven't progressed beyond a VERY rudimentary level! I should sell it really but I've got this dream...

beergeek
09-04-2010, 12:26 AM
What I like about this thread: emphasizes how different things feel or simply new found tonal preferences.

Early on and I think this is a temptation for a lot of ukers, there's this impulse to bash guitar playing and guitarists. Yeah I did some of the same. I've come to conclude that most ukers would do better to connect with musicians who play guitar and other instruments and maybe even bring up skills in other instruments.

I played guitar for most of my life and am grateful for that foundation, and like I said in another thread, I just ordered an actual banjo...

I was with you up to the banjo part :eek:

I've played guitar for over 40 years. It takes me a few minutes to get back in the groove when I switch but I do get there. That said, I prefer to bring an uke along anywhere I go.

Ukuleleblues
09-04-2010, 12:32 AM
I still get mine out occasionally - it's only been a year and a half since I took up the uke. I don't have a problem with the fingering, but the SOUND, so bassy and thick, I sure like the light sprightly uke sound...

I play guitar and uke in our band and you get used to the size difference, but during the first guitar song you really feel the size difference before you settle it. The boominess or thick bass can overpower the ukes so I don't play a flat top guiitar with the ukes. I discovered by accident that archtops sound better with ukes, it doesn't over power them.

luvdat
09-04-2010, 12:56 AM
I'm with luvdat pretty much.

My musical background is firmly with the acoustic guitar - 20 years of it. It was what I first learnt to play music on and write songs on. It gave me an outlet for all the lyrics and poetry I was writing and stopped me from going nutty. Being proficient on the guitar certainly helped me an incredible amount when I started on the uke about 4or so years back. It made the initial journey much quicker. But like any instrument, the deeper you plumb the depths, you find out how much more there is to learn. This is definately true of the ukulele - perhaps not so much with the left hand, but the many right hand strumming patterns take sooooome learning. I do admit to the little voice on my shoulder tempting me to put down guitar stuff occasionally though!!!

We should all be humble and recognise our limitations. I play often with a 12string guitar player and we have a great time. He still can't take the uke seriously but I'm winning him over by degrees.

Hmmm...banjo..a very unforgiving instrument if ever there was one!!! I've had one for a few years now but really haven't progressed beyond a VERY rudimentary level! I should sell it really but I've got this dream...

Ordered a 4 string plectrum which can even be tuned DGBE (Chicago style)....planning on playing rhythm, that's it.

Pippin
09-04-2010, 01:00 AM
I have played ukulele and guitar for over forty years. I can pick up and play each without issues. It is the recognition that each is a "different" instrument and, like carpentry or any other craft, the right tool for the job makes all the difference in the world. I play some tunes of guitar that are just not the same on ukulele, even a baritone, and some on uke that I simply do not enjoy nearly as much on guitar. It is not a matter of being unable to play the song, it is more a matter of the tool is not the best suited for the task.

Right now, I have two guitars left in my stable... Martin dreadnaught and Parkwood grand-auditorium. I actually prefer the Parkwood. In ukes, I have a very nice assortment in all sizes but sopranino.

One of these days, I plan to get a parlor guitar.

fumanshu
09-04-2010, 04:19 AM
I think Pippin is right, I just don't like to see people compare uke vs guitar and bashing each other instruments. Each instrument is different, having their own tone so you just can't compare and every person's taste is different too...

I'm somenone with very small hands and I always thought that I would never play guitar because of that, but I was totally wrong and after perseverance I finally found that there's some stuff that is much easier on guitar than ukes...just practice and everything is feasable.

I enjoy as much playing my Navarro flamenco guitar, Taylor GC7 or my Larrivée P-09 Parlor acoustic guitar as much as I like playing all my custom ukes... It's just different.

Uncle-Taco
09-04-2010, 04:20 AM
I don't know what you guys are complaining about. I seem to do fine with guitars. Those big chords? Piece of cake!

http://scotthamilton.typepad.com/my_weblog/images/six_fingers_1.jpg

Is that Hound Dog Taylor?

Hastour
09-04-2010, 08:54 AM
I picked up my guitar this summer, after a few months of uke playing. It did feel huge and awkward, and it took me some time to stop confusing chord shapes. But a few days of playing both instruments helps, now I can switch comfortably, it takes maybe a song or two to adjust.

Still, I feel no enthusiasm for learning to be a better guitarist. I practice on the uke very often, but I play the guitar only to accompany my friends singing. Sadly, it is much better suited for that than uke, which is simply too quiet to be heard among too many singers... There are also songs which simply don't sound well on the ukulele, no matter how cleverly arranged.

But please, don't be tempted to go guitar bashing... even if some guitarists deserve to be bashed a bit :) We all share the love for music anyway.

Pippin
09-04-2010, 10:17 AM
I picked up my guitar this summer, after a few months of uke playing. It did feel huge and awkward, and it took me some time to stop confusing chord shapes. But a few days of playing both instruments helps, now I can switch comfortably, it takes maybe a song or two to adjust.

Still, I feel no enthusiasm for learning to be a better guitarist. I practice on the uke very often, but I play the guitar only to accompany my friends singing. Sadly, it is much better suited for that than uke, which is simply too quiet to be heard among too many singers... There are also songs which simply don't sound well on the ukulele, no matter how cleverly arranged.

But please, don't be tempted to go guitar bashing... even if some guitarists deserve to be bashed a bit :) We all share the love for music anyway.

Good Post.

Two thoughts... Keep playing both the ukulele and guitar and you will soon need no adjustment, both will come instinctively to you. Second, for accompaniment, some ukuleles are better than others-- due to volume. The KoAloha uke line has some of the loudest ukuleles I have ever heard, yet their tone remains sweet. Ohana makes the CK-70 and CK-75 concert ukes with maple back and sides and spruce tops. They are two of the loudest ukuleles that are on the market today and cost quite a bit less than the KoAloha Hawaiian-made ukes. They are Chinese-made, great quality and great value.

olgoat52
09-04-2010, 12:38 PM
I think Pippin is right, I just don't like to see people compare uke vs guitar and bashing each other instruments. Each instrument is different, having their own tone so you just can't compare and every person's taste is different too...

I'm somenone with very small hands and I always thought that I would never play guitar because of that, but I was totally wrong and after perseverance I finally found that there's some stuff that is much easier on guitar than ukes...just practice and everything is feasable.

I enjoy as much playing my Navarro flamenco guitar, Taylor GC7 or my Larrivée P-09 Parlor acoustic guitar as much as I like playing all my custom ukes... It's just different.

Not sure where the impression of bashing came from. The thread mostly talks about how different it feels moving between the two.

the52blues
09-04-2010, 01:20 PM
I, too, have a long relationship with my acoustic guitars (44 years). I also play 12 string, bass, banjo and mandolin. I got the ukulele bug back in April this year and have 5, all tenors except for a pineapple soprano. I look at them as different instruments, some big, some small. I also play all of the brass and woodwind instruments too but I don't think of them as competition. The ones I play the most are the ones I get paid to play the most which is still guitar and bass but my uke skills are improving and I am slowly working them into the act.

luvdat
09-04-2010, 01:43 PM
Not sure where the impression of bashing came from. The thread mostly talks about how different it feels moving between the two.

The point I made is that what I LIKED about the thread is that it did NOT contain guitar bashing. Previous posts and even intros on this forum have frequently contained negative references to guitarists and guitars.

KevinV
09-04-2010, 02:39 PM
I've really lost interest in the guitar since I took up the 'uke, and I played for nearly 30 years. I don't have anything against them, and they are used frequently in my band, I just don't have the desire to play them anymore. I sold all but one of my collection and think I'll Ebay it this weekend...it just doesn't get any use. And after playing the 'uke, I think I'd rather play a nylon string guitar if I ever venture back that way in the future so there's no reason to hang onto a steel string.

itsme
09-04-2010, 03:34 PM
I've really lost interest in the guitar since I took up the 'uke, and I played for nearly 30 years. I don't have anything against them, and they are used frequently in my band, I just don't have the desire to play them anymore. I sold all but one of my collection and think I'll Ebay it this weekend...it just doesn't get any use. And after playing the 'uke, I think I'd rather play a nylon string guitar if I ever venture back that way in the future so there's no reason to hang onto a steel string.
I come from a background as a classical guitarist and do mostly classical fingerpicking on uke as well. I play uke more than guitar these days, but don't plan to abandon guitar by any means.

The best reason I have for keeping a steel string around is that my husband likes to have his buddies over to play video games, shoot darts and drink. After a few brewskies, someone will inevitably want to "borrow" one of my guitars, since they know I play. Now, I'm not about to let some drunk goober start wailing on one of my (fairly expensive) handmade classicals, so out comes the old Ibanez steel string. They're happy, and my "good" guitars stay safe. :)

Chris Tarman
09-04-2010, 06:48 PM
Is that Hound Dog Taylor?
I think it is. At least that was my first thought! I used to play bass in a band with a guitarist who I met when he lived across the alley from us. The day I met him he was wearing a Hound Dog Taylor T-shirt, which is what caused me to ask if he was a guitarist. Turned out to be the BEST band I ever played in. So I have a fondness for Hound Dog Taylor for that reason!

Hastour
09-04-2010, 10:44 PM
(...) The KoAloha uke line has some of the loudest ukuleles I have ever heard, yet their tone remains sweet. Ohana makes the CK-70 and CK-75 concert ukes with maple back and sides and spruce tops. (...)

Thank you for advice! I've been looking for a new uke for some time, and good volume is one of my priorities, so I'll consider those.

ceviche
09-06-2010, 11:27 AM
We have had a guitar sitting around since the early 60's so today I picked up this giant monster and tryed to play it but only made noise so I removed two strings and retuned it as a uke in low g and tryed again no go OMG!! It's like a mile between frets :) I'll just put the steel strings back on it and put it away


I thought that if I played uke, I could possibly transfer into playing guitar.

So I have tried picking up guitars and I don't see it being possible for me to play a guitar.

Hmm. I guess it's easier to go from guitar to uke for more than one reason. Still, in the end, ability in anything demands a learning curve and a lot of persistence.


I have a nice Martin HD28-35 and I can't play it anymore either. I don't know how I ever did but that was 22years ago but I still have the guitar and it looks brand new. One day I might try again but it seems so big.

Well, you know, if that thing is gathering dust, I'd be more than willing to lighten your load for you. ;)

--Dave E.

lindydanny
09-07-2010, 04:21 AM
Honestly, I started playing ukulele so that I could improve my guitar skills. As funny as that sounds, I'm a better guitar player for learning ukulele.

Currently, I'm working through Mikey Bakers Jazz Guitar Method book 1 on guitar. When I finish (in a year or so since you have to slowly work through it), I'm planning on going back through it and changing all of the chords into ukulele chords and learning jazz ukulele that way.

As far as the difference between necks, there is a huge one for me. But, I will submit that I find there is a big difference between the neck on my Kala tenor and my Mitchell concert. The concert has a thicker neck (because it is admittedly a cheaper instrument). It takes my fingers only a few moments to get used to either neck. What has helped is playing in situations where I switch back and forth between the two with no warm up (I play weekly at church like this).

Also, there is a distinct difference in the two instruments. There was a thread about playing ukulele like a guitar and it dawned on me during that thread (it may have been actually said this way; I'm too lazy to look it up) that playing strumming and percussive patterns on ukulele the same way I do on guitar is wrong. As a result, I'm better at playing ukulele now because I treat it like a different instrument.

As for using it to be a better guitar player, think of the scales and training your ear there. How hard is it to even take back-packer guitar around everywhere compared to a uke of any size? Am I right! I can diddle through patterns for scales and still get the ear training. Also, most of the chords translate very well, I only have to start thinking of the base notes when I switch to guitar which makes me think about my playing there anyway and I consider that a good thing.

So, personally, the uke and the guitar go hand it hand for me.

~DB

Big_Fred
09-07-2010, 06:05 AM
I don't have a problem with the fingering, but the SOUND, so bassy and thick, I sure like the light sprightly uke sound..

My only guitar is an Ovation 12 string Balladeer, which I hardly ever play anymore. After playing Uke for over a year, I pick up the Ovation and feel like it is shouting at me. The word that springs to mind is 'vulgar'.

Bobasan
09-07-2010, 07:17 AM
I'm new to the uke, coming at it from a classical guitar background, and I am finding that I am just playing more of everything. I play something on the guitar and get inspired to try it out on the uke and visa versa. I just need to find another guitar/uke player in my area to get play with now he he.

Dirka
09-09-2010, 01:37 AM
When I first tried my sisters guitar, it seemed really clunky to me, and those six strings were just impossible. Then I picked up a friends Strat clone and things were even worse, what with the higher string tension and less space between them. A few weeks ago, my sisters best friend left her really nice acoustic guitar at our house, so I restringed it for her and fiddled around with it for a bit. Now I like guitars :D

SweetWaterBlue
09-09-2010, 03:56 AM
After plunking on the uke for a few months, I started yearning for more base (started a thread on that somewhere). That eventually led me to read up on bass guitars, but eventually I just bought a used acoustic guitar. I already had a classical guitar I got in high school and never play. After playing the new guitar for a few weeks, I put it back in its case and haven't really touched it in months because I got into baritone ukes. The baritone provides me with a decent bass line, but is still easy to play (Compared to a 6 string guitar), and keeps me in the uke community and I like the fellowship that provides. I think the baritone uke (or tenor guitar) is very close to the perfect guitar for a beginner.

I still play my soprano and concert occasionally, but I traded off my tenor for a baritone and don't regret it (too much lol). I am still in my uke infancy, so its tough to say where I will end up, but the guitar is never far away.

olgoat52
09-09-2010, 05:30 AM
Honestly, I started playing ukulele so that I could improve my guitar skills. As funny as that sounds, I'm a better guitar player for learning ukulele.

Currently, I'm working through Mikey Bakers Jazz Guitar Method book 1 on guitar. When I finish (in a year or so since you have to slowly work through it), I'm planning on going back through it and changing all of the chords into ukulele chords and learning jazz ukulele that way.

As far as the difference between necks, there is a huge one for me. But, I will submit that I find there is a big difference between the neck on my Kala tenor and my Mitchell concert. The concert has a thicker neck (because it is admittedly a cheaper instrument). It takes my fingers only a few moments to get used to either neck. What has helped is playing in situations where I switch back and forth between the two with no warm up (I play weekly at church like this).

Also, there is a distinct difference in the two instruments. There was a thread about playing ukulele like a guitar and it dawned on me during that thread (it may have been actually said this way; I'm too lazy to look it up) that playing strumming and percussive patterns on ukulele the same way I do on guitar is wrong. As a result, I'm better at playing ukulele now because I treat it like a different instrument.

As for using it to be a better guitar player, think of the scales and training your ear there. How hard is it to even take back-packer guitar around everywhere compared to a uke of any size? Am I right! I can diddle through patterns for scales and still get the ear training. Also, most of the chords translate very well, I only have to start thinking of the base notes when I switch to guitar which makes me think about my playing there anyway and I consider that a good thing.

So, personally, the uke and the guitar go hand it hand for me.

~DB

Mickey's book is great. Started with that 36 years ago.. (OMG... that just sunk in.. ) Stay away for Joe Pass's books. He'll scare you to death ;-)

ErnieJ
09-09-2010, 05:37 AM
I find playing uke helps my guitar playing and vise versa. Uke is actually helping me to become a better guitar player because it seems to be easier to get into advanced chords and progressions on the uke which I then, out of curiosity, have to try on the guitar and it is very fun to do that.

olgoat52
09-09-2010, 05:49 AM
When I first tried my sisters guitar, it seemed really clunky to me, and those six strings were just impossible. Then I picked up a friends Strat clone and things were even worse, what with the higher string tension and less space between them. A few weeks ago, my sisters best friend left her really nice acoustic guitar at our house, so I restringed it for her and fiddled around with it for a bit. Now I like guitars :D

I think one of the pit falls that most guitarists fall into is that IF they learn to play chords (seemed like I was the only guy in any of the bands that ever new any, everyone else just wanted to solo...) they feel compelled to use all 6 strings. What I found with the uke is how little I new about 4 string inversions and how much cleaner the music can be by not always using the full width of the neck on a guitar. Gives you a greater appreciation for guys like Eddie Condon and Eddie Lang.

olgoat52
09-09-2010, 05:51 AM
I've really lost interest in the guitar since I took up the 'uke, and I played for nearly 30 years. I don't have anything against them, and they are used frequently in my band, I just don't have the desire to play them anymore. I sold all but one of my collection and think I'll Ebay it this weekend...it just doesn't get any use. And after playing the 'uke, I think I'd rather play a nylon string guitar if I ever venture back that way in the future so there's no reason to hang onto a steel string.

I guess I would hold on to at least one. You never know how you're gonna feel tomorrow ;)

scottie
09-09-2010, 06:34 AM
I started out as a guitar player and will always be a guitar player who enjoys the uke. There are many things to like about the guitar. There also many things to like about the ukulele.

Physically, there are advantages to be gained in having the strength together with accuracy that comes from playing a guitar which will greatly enhance your ukulele playing. It's all about controlled strength. Being able to get used to the two vastly different instruments is something that conservatory students (who must have a primary and secondary instrument) routinely deal with. It makes you a better musician.

ceviche
09-09-2010, 08:59 PM
I find playing uke helps my guitar playing and vise versa. Uke is actually helping me to become a better guitar player because it seems to be easier to get into advanced chords and progressions on the uke which I then, out of curiosity, have to try on the guitar and it is very fun to do that.

:agree: Word!

--Dave E.

lindydanny
09-10-2010, 03:03 AM
Mickey's book is great. Started with that 36 years ago.. (OMG... that just sunk in.. ) Stay away for Joe Pass's books. He'll scare you to death ;-)

Oh, I bought Joe's books first... The fact that his chord book says it is mostly in C (I think) and about three quarters of the chords don't have a root note threw me off big time. Still, his style is good for a kick in the teeth once in a while.

I've also gotten into Charlton Johnson's book "Swing and Big Band Guitar: Four-To-The-Bar Comping in the Style of Freddie Green". It makes an odd supplament to Mickey's book. I do about one exercise a week out of there just to get a different perspective. I've learned quite a bit from both.

~DB

Keef
09-10-2010, 05:00 AM
on a guitar you have 6 strings and four fingers and a thumb is that ever a problem?

lindydanny
09-10-2010, 09:42 AM
on a guitar you have 6 strings and four fingers and a thumb is that ever a problem?

That's why God created bar-chords.

Keef
09-10-2010, 04:51 PM
I thought bar chords were simple chords you used in a honky tonk bar when everyone is to drunk to care what you sound like :)

monty
09-10-2010, 05:16 PM
I thought bar chords were simple chords you used in a honky tonk bar when everyone is to drunk to care what you sound like :)

:P Dad joke count is rising!

cletus
09-10-2010, 05:24 PM
I use barre chords when playing for my ballerina friends.

Keef
09-11-2010, 02:39 AM
I use barre chords when playing for my ballerina friends. I just don't know what to think about this :)

ricdoug
09-11-2010, 01:16 PM
Having 61 guitars and 15 ukes, I go back and forth between them. I like the difference in fret spacing. On the ukulele I generally perform on sopranos. BTW, each of my guitars gets played at least once every 2 weeks. When Guitar Center sells strings 10 sets for $20 bucks, I clean them out. Ric

ichadwick
09-12-2010, 02:06 AM
I played guitar since the early 1960s and have had dozens. But when I started to play the uke, I simply found it uncomfortable. I had gotten too accustomed to the shorter spaces and narrower necks. Eventually I sold the two guitars that remained, and bought more ukes.

bnicholas26
09-13-2010, 04:15 PM
I don't know what you guys are complaining about. I seem to do fine with guitars. Those big chords? Piece of cake!

http://scotthamilton.typepad.com/my_weblog/images/six_fingers_1.jpg

holy god, it pops out when you count the fingers...