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SuzukHammer
10-07-2010, 12:00 AM
I am reading a profound book right now. I tried to read the book before but I did not like the subject at the time. Now, I find it is an intriquing book because of things happening in my life.

So here's the point. I have a feeling that I will play my uke differently while I am in this way of thinking. I just have to finish work and set apart the time to do it.

My question to others is: Does events in your life change your uke style? Do the emotions bring out a different rhythm?

I'm thinking if I tried to play wrecklessly like before that it won't sound the same.

Get ready, I'm breaking out the Kelii for my mood.

Hippie Dribble
10-07-2010, 12:16 AM
hi Suzuk

yeah, I tend to think that your playing style is impacted by the way you are feeling at any given time. Certainly, one's choice of songs is colored by mood...as someone who has long suffered from depression, I find that when I'm down my patience level is also very low and I give up really fast, especially if I'm struggling to learn a new song

Also playing slows down during these times and one is more likely to play a sad song, maybe some gentle blues style picking, all to amplify the mood - ie wallowing in self pity. I find during these times that I can be very near tears or actually start crying...but hey, that's the power of music and it's universal. Conversely, when you're "up" you naturally have more energy so you are more inclined to play faster, more positive tunes and, if you're performing, ham it up a bit

On the other hand, a way to lighten the burden is to actually force yourself to play a happy song...sometimes it's a little infectious and it can give you a lift.

All just random thoughts off the top of my head. Incidentally mate, very curious as to what book it is you are reading...

mackie
10-07-2010, 12:27 AM
yep! i guess any artistic form will always be an expression. i often find myself channelling what i feel on a song. it goes both ways too i think. sometimes i express the song's sentiment too.

SuzukHammer
10-07-2010, 12:28 AM
I am reading Eckhart Tolle's The Power of NOW and at this point of my life, it is exactly what's needed. I played some uke on the plane on the way over but I've been holding off playing for a few days because I know that what I will play is going to feel "more deliberately creative - improvisation" and I feel like I want hours for it. And I remember plucking my new Kelii before I left on the trip and that's the tone I want.

Hippie Dribble
10-07-2010, 01:27 AM
I am reading Eckhart Tolle's The Power of NOW and at this point of my life, it is exactly what's needed. I played some uke on the plane on the way over but I've been holding off playing for a few days because I know that what I will play is going to feel "more deliberately creative - improvisation" and I feel like I want hours for it. And I remember plucking my new Kelii before I left on the trip and that's the tone I want.

Glad you've found a book that you can immerse yourself in Suzuk. I read a biography on Keith Green a few years back and felt very much the same.

But on to Tolle: though I'm not opposed to where Tolle arrives, I'm totally opposed to the underpin of his argument. To me, as a Christian, he is just another new age guru having his 15minutes. I don't like the implicit focus on the "self" in his, or any other new age teaching. I think whenever we focus too much on "self" we inevitably are on shaky ground...I only believe in looking "inward" when it aids in the goal of reaching "outward " to help others in a practical way...Just my opinion mate.

But what I do agree with, especially applying his views to playing the ukulele, is to let go of self-consciousness. To listen to music itself is a liberating experience, so why shouldn't the playing of it be also? Too much theory...too much over-thinking...sometimes it's good to just let your fingers move around the fretboard and over the strings and see what happens in the moment. Let it be what it is and enjoy it for that.

joeybug
10-07-2010, 01:31 AM
hi Suzuk

yeah, I tend to think that your playing style is impacted by the way you are feeling at any given time. Certainly, one's choice of songs is colored by mood...as someone who has long suffered from depression, I find that when I'm down my patience level is also very low and I give up really fast, especially if I'm struggling to learn a new song

Also playing slows down during these times and one is more likely to play a sad song, maybe some gentle blues style picking, all to amplify the mood - ie wallowing in self pity. I find during these times that I can be very near tears or actually start crying...but hey, that's the power of music and it's universal. Conversely, when you're "up" you naturally have more energy so you are more inclined to play faster, more positive tunes and, if you're performing, ham it up a bit

On the other hand, a way to lighten the burden is to actually force yourself to play a happy song...sometimes it's a little infectious and it can give you a lift.

All just random thoughts off the top of my head. Incidentally mate, very curious as to what book it is you are reading...

:agree: with all of this. You've said it better, mate, than I could!

mm stan
10-07-2010, 04:29 AM
Aloha Suzuk,
I agree with Eugene on Too much theory and over thinking, One must feel the music and flow with it and use your creativity to expand your personal ukulele experience.
It is what makes our music so individual and unique...Have fun and enjoy!!!"Keep strumming them strings" MM Stan...

SuzukHammer
10-07-2010, 08:30 AM
Well, it was nice to play the Kelii , then I took the Fluke up to the swimming pool and it fell off a table and I was just happy it wasn't the Kelii.

But, I went back to what I knew and played what I had learned before. And it was satisfying. Too satisfying to stay philosophical :)

rogerthat778
10-07-2010, 09:38 AM
When I'm improvising, my playing is definitely affected by how I feel at the moment. I noticed this by accident one time when I started playing my uke near a cemetery... (not a great idea btw)

lozarkman
10-07-2010, 01:40 PM
Oh yes, I definitely think the mood of the moment and happenings in our life affect our emotional approach to a song and how we interpet it. I often wonder how artists go into a studio and perform some of the fantastic albums/songs they do without some sort of emotional/physical preparation. I am sure they have performed so much they have a catalog of emotional responses to a song that helps set it up for them, but I am sure it isn't always easy. Since my hernia operation last week, I have leaned a lot more toward Bluesy Oh Woe is Me songs :) Suddenly I am really into Hank Williams Sr Songs for awhile :) Lozark

Pippin
10-07-2010, 08:39 PM
I think whenever we focus too much on "self" we inevitably are on shaky ground...I only believe in looking "inward" when it aids in the goal of reaching "outward " to help others in a practical way...Just my opinion mate.

Looking inward, like the Oracle at Delphi, "Know Thyself" is important in that "What a Man feels in his heart, so is he." It is important to truly understand yourself, your actions, your reactions. When you see yourself for what you are and understand those things, then you can work to use your strengths in the best possible light and work to strengthen your weaknesses.

Teek
10-07-2010, 11:06 PM
@ eugene ukulele I have to note that as a student of Tolle myself, your interpretation of what he teaches is inaccurate if you believe he writes "New Age" stuff, his teachings are based on Buddhism and the kernels of the best wisdom of Christianity. He is all about embracing the Buddhist philosophy of "NO self", meaning letting go of ego, which is in agreement with your opinion that too much focus on self puts one on shaky ground. I'd say have another look at Power of Now, it is a brilliant book. Western idea of self is that we are our ego self. We are not. Tolle writes on consciousness and awareness of self, in order to reach the place of no self, the opposite of self absorption.

Westerners tend to live in the future or the past and seldom in the moment. The power of music is that it brings us into the moment, and living in this very moment, moment to moment to moment, is the only place we CAN live, not the past, not the future. Pippin has a good view on this except I think he meant to say work to "weaken" our weakness! ;)

Being present in the Now and away from my ego self is where I like to go with my ukes. They all speak to me and often it's the uke that directs what I fool around with. Mostly I am a noodler, working on learning the notes and the fretboard, and theory. It's not real easy for me but I don't um fret about it, it's the journey I enjoy. When I try something and it works and I spend some time exploring it I enjoy that. That's really being in the moment. They always cheer me up. I take that joy with me. If I work on a song and don't do well, I know the time isn't wasted, that something sank in, because the next time is usually better.

The only moods I don't like is where I'm so tired or bummed I don't even want to pick up a uke.

Hippie Dribble
10-08-2010, 01:07 AM
hi Teek

I agree with what you say about your approach to the uke. It's about the journey, the process is where she should put our focus, in the "now" you talk about. That's awesome. Don't over think. Don't put undue or unrealistic pressure on yourself. Just enjoy making music with an instrument that is beautiful and humble.

But back to Tolle: sure his teachings are based on Buddhism and the kernels of the best wisdom of Christianity. I agree. That is exactly what teachers within the new age movement do. They take things they like from different faiths and make up their own, based on what suits them. Tolle is a classic new age thinker.

Let us just agree to disagree. Like Dylan said, most likely you go your way and I'll go mine.

Hippie Dribble
10-08-2010, 01:11 AM
Looking inward, like the Oracle at Delphi, "Know Thyself" is important in that "What a Man feels in his heart, so is he." It is important to truly understand yourself, your actions, your reactions. When you see yourself for what you are and understand those things, then you can work to use your strengths in the best possible light and work to strengthen your weaknesses.

I completely agree with this. But let's use this knowledge to make the world a better place, to share love, to share wisdom...not just make ourselves more self aware. What is the point of that. We're all in this together. Fine, if we were hermits and weren't social beings but we are neither hermits nor anti social beings.

joeybug
10-08-2010, 01:27 AM
I completely agree with this. But let's use this knowledge to make the world a better place, to share love, to share wisdom...not just make ourselves more self aware. What is the point of that. We're all in this together. Fine, if we were hermits and weren't social beings but we are neither hermits nor anti social beings.

:agree: totally with you on this. We should use our knowledge and power (if we have any) to make the world a better place.

As for the original question, I find that when I'm hurting, my Ukulele playing reflects that, when I'm happy I play happily, my mood does influence my playing, I'm very new at this whole Ukulele thing, but I think it's all intertwined, happiness that comes from playing an instrument like the Ukulele can influence how we feel after practise/playing. I know that on bad days with pain, hearing others play helps me, hearing myself improve helps me, it all brings a smile to my face and reminds me that life is worth the pain sometimes.

Sorry if I'm rambling and not making sense, I'm on the morphine again, had a run of bad days sadly...

Teek
10-09-2010, 03:21 AM
hi Teek

I agree with what you say about your approach to the uke. It's about the journey, the process is where she should put our focus, in the "now" you talk about. That's awesome. Don't over think. Don't put undue or unrealistic pressure on yourself. Just enjoy making music with an instrument that is beautiful and humble.

But back to Tolle: sure his teachings are based on Buddhism and the kernels of the best wisdom of Christianity. I agree. That is exactly what teachers within the new age movement do. They take things they like from different faiths and make up their own, based on what suits them. Tolle is a classic new age thinker.

Let us just agree to disagree. Like Dylan said, most likely you go your way and I'll go mine.

I don't think we are in disageeement on Tolle. More just interpretations of concepts vary. The actual basic point that Tolle and some teachers of his caliber make that some people miss is that when we get "self" out of the equation we become "un-self-ish". It isn't "making up" a faith, it's distilling the wisdom and making it more accessible, showing a more conscious way to live one's life.

L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology is a true example of literally making up a faith. Hubbard said that he could, that he would, and he did. And his faith is all ego based and money oriented.