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View Full Version : Why are people so interested in vintage ukuleles?



allie
10-13-2010, 08:20 PM
I'm just curious about why people seem to be so interested in vintage ukuleles.. do they sound better? Or is it just a novelty/collectors' thing? I see a lot on ebay and majority of them are cracked and not necessarily aesthetically pleasing but people will bid REALLY high on them. So I'm just wondering if maybe they have a different sound to them that you don't find in modern ukuleles or if there's something really cool about them that I don't understand.

Thanks!

Pippin
10-13-2010, 08:35 PM
Depending on the ukulele, yes, they can sound better. Some people collect vintage ukes as an investment. Others want them to play. For me, it is a link to the past, but moreso, there are some ukes that are just hard to find and I can understand people's reasons for buying them.

buddhuu
10-13-2010, 11:29 PM
It's not just 'ukuleles, Allie: you get the same thing with mandolins, guitars, fiddles...

It's partly a mojo thing - there's a kind of a feeling of history and soul that soaks into old instruments.

There's also the fact that acoustic instruments seem to mature and the sound gradually changes with playing and as the wood ages.

Another thing is that many of the instruments made today consciously try to reproduce the classic designs of days gone by. So, if that retro stuff is cool obviously the originals must be even cooler than the repros.

Scarcity and hype push up the perceived desirability of instruments, and consequently their prices.

I love old instruments, but for some perverse reason, the instruments I actually own I would rather buy new.

joeybug
10-14-2010, 12:15 AM
It's not just 'ukuleles, Allie: you get the same thing with mandolins, guitars, fiddles...

It's partly a mojo thing - there's a kind of a feeling of history and soul that soaks into old instruments.


:agree: I came here to say just that

Tudorp
10-14-2010, 03:32 AM
For me, it's the history of it. I collect antiques anyway. not nessisarily expensive antiques, but just anything that appeals to me whether it has a high monitary value or not. With Ukes, and other musical instruments, I love the history it holds. I like to play something that someone else played with their heart and soul maybe 80-100 years ago. I like to think and picture in my mind the original owner with it in their hands, smiling and playing. Who they played for, etc...

Even tho it isn't uke related, but I have a turn of the century player piano that I traced the history back to being in honkey tonks in Texas, and then ended up in one in California. It isn't a very ornate, "pricy" piano, but rather sort of plain looking, and actually pretty tattered looking, BUT still works as it did 100 years ago. I love to play it with it's plinky rinky tink sound and think about all the floosey's, and flapper girls sitting accross the top of it, maybe the old man in a bowler hat bouncing up and down playing rag time on it. I like to imagine the beer, white liqur and all the other drinks that were spilled on it with everyone crowded around it singing drunk lalabys.. Anyway.. It's fun to think of the past, and to have that real link with it..

That said, and this has came up on the forum before, but sometimes people hear it and love the piano, and then ask me why I don't refinish it to make it look better. I considered it several times over the years I have had it, but just can never bring myself to do that to it. I look at that as erasing it's history.. I love it in all it's honky tonk abused glory..

RyanMFT
10-14-2010, 05:11 AM
For me, there is something a little magical about a uke that has survived for many more years than I have been on earth. I too like to imagine the history of it being owned and loved by others, having played music that I don't know, and having been made by hands of people who lived in a different time, a different era.

Also, for many vintage instruments, the quality of the build and materials used in the build are excellent, and when one is willing to really search for and find a great vintage uke, the price for such a high quality instrument is actually much lower than what one would have to pay for a similar quality new instrument. All my vintage uke's have come to me at very reasonable prices. I never could have afforded them at full eBay prices.

Finally, I have always liked old, broken, and cast away things. It is joyful for me to bring them back to life, restore, or just to recognize their beauty when others had just seen them as kind of worthless.

Tudorp
10-14-2010, 05:25 AM
Finally, I have always liked old, broken, and cast away things. It is joyful for me to bring them back to life, restore, or just to recognize their beauty when others had just seen them as kind of worthless.

hear hear.. that is another huge point for me as well..

spruce
10-14-2010, 05:36 AM
It's hard to beat those non-symetrical teens Hawaiian all-koa sopranos on the Coolness Scale, even if a lot of them are hammered or don't play in tune...

http://i231.photobucket.com/albums/ee22/e_stamp/P1060675.jpg

Jim T.
10-14-2010, 06:22 AM
My grandfather's Kumalae won't stay in tune, but the idea that I can (try to) play the 'ukulele he brought with him to college when he left Honolulu in 1925 is a thrill.

mm stan
10-14-2010, 08:00 AM
Aloha Allie,
Actually I like vintage and collectable ukuleles if they sound nice most of all, it is my first criteria...In general, all vintage/collectables may not sound good, but there are some really
excellent ones out there....and there's like the extrodinary ones...the top of the line ones like the Martin 5K...everybody's dream uke....if I can get both, I'll be a happy camper..lol
As you compare to the new high end ones now, the new ones with the curent technology may have more substain and resonation and the older ones may have a sweeter tone due to its quality build and
maturing of the wood. I guess it boils down to what you want....As for history, many seem to connect to the glamour of an vintage instrument and to play something that
has been welll played and adored throughout the years....and then some for it's increasing investment value... Many have been passed down through famalies for generations and
have a huge sentimental value as well, as their past generations have played the same instrument....
I guess a proper metephor would be...would you like a brand new shiny car or a rare vintage auto that when everybody sees, their mouth drops....WOW!! Stan..

Brewerpaul
10-14-2010, 03:27 PM
My grandfather's Kumalae won't stay in tune, but the idea that I can (try to) play the 'ukulele he brought with him to college when he left Honolulu in 1925 is a thrill.

Take it to a uke maker or other luthier. With new strings and a tweak or replacement of the tuning pegs, you may well be able to keep Grampa's uke in tune. That would be even more of a thrill, and I'll bet he'd be proud that you cared enough to tend his uke.

Link
10-14-2010, 03:36 PM
I've never really understood the vintage thing. Same with guitars, clothes, vinyl records... I'd rather have something that looks, plays, and probably sounds better. But then again, I can definitely see me as an older man trying to get my hand on old Mainland ukuleles. Hmm.

Chris Tarman
10-14-2010, 06:02 PM
There are several reasons I can think of: I like old things in general, especially hand-made, somewhat anachronistic things (such as the rather large pipe collection you can see behind me in my Youtube videos, although not all of those are old). Vintage ukuleles are perfect for that. Also, some of them sound better and are made better (or at least DIFFERENTLY made) from ukuleles today. Some people believe acoustic instruments improve with age. If they're well-cared for, they improve in LOOKS as well as sound. I've rarely seen a new instrument with a nice patina. Not just ukuleles, either. I've played new Fender Jazz basses, and they're nice, but none of the new ones have the same well-loved look and cool "vibe" that my '77 Jazz Bass has.
Another big part of it for me is their rarity. There are only a finite number of old Martin ukuleles, for example. They may have sold a LOT of them, but there were only so many to begin with, and that number decreases every year (I hate to think how many are buried in land-fills). No matter what I might think of my new Mainland or my Kalas, they will most likely NEVER EVER have the same appeal as an 80 or 90 year old Martin, or Gibson, or vintage Hawaiian-made ukulele. And neither will the ukuleles currently made by Martin (in my opinion), even the very high-end reissued Style 3s and 5s.
Don't get me wrong, I like new ukuleles too! But I'm planning to keep looking for good deals on vintage ukes while I can. Why do concert violinists all want a 17th century Italian violin?

TCK
10-14-2010, 06:44 PM
Hmm- interesting question, one which I have pondered a LOT. In the last few weeks (about six) I seem to have acquired quite a few Ukuleles, coupla really nice ones, mostly to keep me from playing the heck out of my 70 yr old Martin. I gotta say, and I am not sure what it is- bone saddle and nut, age of the wood, history of all the hands that plucked out 5'2" on it...the thing sounds AMAZING (esp. now that I have it sorted).
Truth be told, my other collection...obsession, is the accordion. I lucked into a hand made Sonola in the nineties for a song, and it is the only one I play, even though there are 20 others laying around. That whole hand crafted thing definitely has it's target audience as well.
Chris- pipes? Got those too- would love to see what you are holding. Also have a thing for hand carved burl I suppose.

spruce
10-14-2010, 07:00 PM
In general, all vintage/collectables may not sound good, but there are some really
excellent ones out there........if I can get both, I'll be a happy camper...

I was in the market for an old Kamaka Pineapple recently, but have run into quite a few that didn't play in tune...
Poorly located frets are damn near impossible to fix... :(

But I recently saw this one (http://elderly.com//vintage/items/180U-1165.htm), and pulled the trigger merely because Elderly--who I totally trust--said it possessed "excellent sound and playability"....

Man, they were not kidding...

This thing sounds fabulous, and plays in tune all the way up the neck...

I did also buy another Pineapple (for 200 bucks no less) that doesn't play in tune, has a trashed soundhole, and the bridge is a full 1/2" (I'm not kidding) too far to the treble side....

It's still beautiful, and has the iconic pineapple decal....
But it ain't a player, and may never be one...
We'll see...

http://i231.photobucket.com/albums/ee22/e_stamp/Kamaka%20Pineapple/5026177271_4700b58bae_b.jpg

Teek
10-14-2010, 10:25 PM
Oh Ho! YOU bought that! I just got one circa 30s-40s, gosh it's sweet but needs frets reset to play above 2nd fret with no buzz. THEN the bridge just popped off! But I figure by the time it visits the luthier and gets sorted out I will still be at a fair price.

The thing about vintage vs new to me is vintage if it has been loved and played comes preloaded with all kinds of mojo, WANTS to be played again, and has history AND a story to tell. New ukes never have that feel for me, except for my custom pineapple that Brad Donaldson made, he has an awesome energy and that uke came full of mojo and all around good vibes. It speaks to everyone who picks it up, whether they play it or not. It gets comments to how good it feels just to hold it, and also as to how lovely it is. It has wow factor with very little bling, it just has great energy.

I get a kick out of my new ukes, but it's the older ones that whisper oh yeah, here we go, cool! when they come out of their cases.

mm stan
10-15-2010, 03:29 AM
Aloha Bruce,
What a score on the pineapples, the first one looks awesome...a deluxe model, so it's almost garantee's to sound good....
The second one, for $200.00 is definetly a wall hanger and a good conversation starter for sure ....I'd grab both of those in a second....
Have fun and enjoy!!! and thanks for sharing!!!! I'd better check out elderly more often now, there seems to be some gems there.
MM Stan....

Jerlial Prophet
10-15-2010, 03:59 AM
I have a friend who loves to at least take a look at every vintage instrument he passes by. I, personally, am not a fan of vintage instruments. Other people see history, connections to the past, classics, rare, etc. I just see someone else's old beat up instrument. I'd like to have an old one someday, but I want it to be one that I had when it was new and got all of it's seasoning from me.

Gmoney
10-15-2010, 04:08 AM
Vintage?! I'M vintage, so why not a vintage uke? Actually, I will one day own a vintage Martin & at least one vintage Kamaka pineapple - just haven't had the $$ & the opportunity at the same time. Like so many others, I love the fact that a vintage uke has provided years of enjoyment to its previous owners & like me, has many years left to continue to do so.

I have now purchased two "vintage" ukes - a "no name" one of no apparent value other than its age - except it came with a complete set of ukulele lessons from the "Hawaiian Institute of Music" dated 1919 that are a really wonderful example of the popularity of this instrument during its early 1900's heyday. I'll be cleaning up the uke this weekend & stringing it w/Aquila's to see how it sounds.

The other I haven't received yet, but it is a Kamaka-Keiki made in the mid-60's that at least in all of the photos looks to be in pretty good shape. I know this one isn't the "Kamaka-to-beat-all-Kamaka's", but it does date to the time of my own musical "awakening" - I was a teen-ager in the turbulent '60's; my brother went to 'Nam & I was left to start learning guitar & listen to all of the anti-war angst coming from my musical hero's. Who of my generation can not hear Dylan, Baez, Country Joe & the Fish, or CCR & not be at least a little nostalgic? So, my Kamaka-Keiki will be a bit of a tangible connection to that time in my life & the many others who have owned this little instrument.

Skitzic
10-15-2010, 04:35 AM
It's all about the mojo.

janeray1940
10-15-2010, 04:53 AM
I tend to buy vintage for just about everything - clothes, furniture, etc. So when I started playing I was certain I wanted a vintage uke. I'd agree with many of the reasons already posted - the link to the past, the "mojo." Plus, I wanted to avoid the whole made-in-China issue and at the time, I couldn't afford a made-in-Hawaii "K" brand. I was on the lookout for a Martin 0; when one failed to materialize in time I bought this 1920s vintage mahogany uke (http://www.flickr.com/photos/littleblackmaryjanes/sets/72157623246848682/).

Turned out that for me, vintage instruments kind of fall into the same category as vintage cars - they're nice to have, but only if you also have a shiny new one to rely on as your "daily driver." My vintage uke is beautiful to look at, but way too fussy to play. Despite having been given a once-over by a reputable luthier, the friction tuners still slip and there are intonation issues. I needed to bring a tuner and a screwdriver with me everywhere I went. And the intonation problems drove my instructor a little crazy :)

Skitzic
10-15-2010, 05:02 AM
I tend to buy vintage for just about everything - clothes, furniture, etc. So when I started playing I was certain I wanted a vintage uke. I'd agree with many of the reasons already posted - the link to the past, the "mojo." Plus, I wanted to avoid the whole made-in-China issue and at the time, I couldn't afford a made-in-Hawaii "K" brand. I was on the lookout for a Martin 0; when one failed to materialize in time I bought this 1920s vintage mahogany uke (http://www.flickr.com/photos/littleblackmaryjanes/sets/72157623246848682/).

Turned out that for me, vintage instruments kind of fall into the same category as vintage cars - they're nice to have, but only if you also have a shiny new one to rely on as your "daily driver." My vintage uke is beautiful to look at, but way too fussy to play. Despite having been given a once-over by a reputable luthier, the friction tuners still slip and there are intonation issues. I needed to bring a tuner and a screwdriver with me everywhere I went. And the intonation problems drove my instructor a little crazy :)

It's a shame it has issues because it sure is a pretty one!

spruce
10-15-2010, 05:07 AM
It's all about the mojo.

Ya know, I hang in Tele, Les Paul, and mando groups, and this is the only place where a "vintage vs. modern" discussion like this can be taken seriously...

Speaks to the problems of a lot of vintage ukes, and to the talents of modern makers...

janeray1940
10-15-2010, 06:29 AM
It's a shame it has issues because it sure is a pretty one!

Aw, thanks. I still play it sometimes when I'm just strumming - it comes with me on road trips and such.

SailingUke
10-15-2010, 06:42 AM
My old Gibson has a voice so totally different than any new ukelele I have heard.
I guess after 85+ years it has mellowed.
For me playing a vintage instrument is connecting to the past.
Knowing someone else probably loved and shared music is a cool thing for me.

PrestonM
10-15-2010, 07:45 AM
The one thing I have noticed, the majority of replies to this "vintage" thread were made by "senior" menmbers. Ha ha!

haole
10-15-2010, 08:09 AM
Turned out that for me, vintage instruments kind of fall into the same category as vintage cars - they're nice to have, but only if you also have a shiny new one to rely on as your "daily driver." My vintage uke is beautiful to look at, but way too fussy to play. Despite having been given a once-over by a reputable luthier, the friction tuners still slip and there are intonation issues. I needed to bring a tuner and a screwdriver with me everywhere I went. And the intonation problems drove my instructor a little crazy :)

This is pretty much how I feel about vintage instruments. The history/mojo is neat, but honestly, most of today's instruments are just built a lot better and a lot more consistently than the old ones. Some old instruments really are magical, but that doesn't mean that Martin and Gibson and Kamaka didn't put out a bunch of duds over the years.

Mike M3
10-15-2010, 08:18 AM
my only uke is vintage but as a mandolin player there is just something lovely about the vintage Martin A style and the Gibson F.I guess it is not only the sound but the finish that just oozes character.I am mainly a keyboard player and really cherish my 1050-60's Hammond tone wheel organs.I have had the digital synths and they all fizzle out after ten years.My Hammonds,you can squirt them full of wd-40 and replace tubes once and they seem to last forever,and the sound of a Hammond and Leslie tone cabinet just can't be duplicated with the new stuff..Mike.

SailingUke
10-15-2010, 08:34 AM
The one thing I have noticed, the majority of replies to this "vintage" thread were made by "senior" menmbers. Ha ha!

I resemble that remark, ya young whipper snapper. :) :) :)

70sSanO
10-15-2010, 10:10 AM
I tend to think that people are enamored with almost anything vintage these days. And a number of reasons are nostalgic and being able to have something that was around when many of us were kids... and of course collectible value.

It is funny that vintage used be be called old and that meant cheaper than new. I bought used electric guitars in the 60's because I couldn't afford new ones. I had no idea that they were supposed to be better... I wish someone had told me, I wouldn't have sold any of them.

The truth is todays CNC close tolerance manufacturing is better is every way than the same level of quality instrument that was made 70 or 80 years... except for the wood. I wouid think since so much old growth is gone today that is the one area where vintage is better. Now if someone had stockpiled tonewood from 70 and 80 years ago, now you're talking.

John

spruce
10-15-2010, 10:24 AM
... except for the wood. I wouid think since so much old growth is gone today that is the one area where vintage is better.

Nah....

Old growth is still very available in most species....

And the processing methods today are much more conducive to producing a good instrument, especially if we're talking spruce...

The tops in a typical modern high-end Martin guitar, for instance, kill the tops in the vintage instruments...

Minimal runout, better attention paid to whether the wood is on-quarter, reduction of bookmatch checking due to hidden windshakes, more attention paid to uneven coloration, etc. etc....

A lot of it has to do with the fact that logs are being milled today specifically for musical instruments (24" long hand-splits for guitars, for instance), whereas in the past lumber was the source....
Big difference....

Nothing like an old instrument that's been banged on for 75 years, but the ones that are being built today have a better chance of sounding good 75 years from now, IMHO....

RyanMFT
10-15-2010, 11:25 AM
I think it is a matter of what appeals to each of us. Exact tolerances are great, perfectly milled wood is great......However, I'm not sure they are better in every way. For those of us who find value in the history and background of an instrument I think it changes the way it sounds to us. I guess it is where we feel at home. Every time I look on the wall in my family room where I have hanging a vintage Martin, Favilla, Kumalae, and Nunes I am filled with a sense of gratitude that these instruments were around before I was, and will long outlast me. I feel a connection to, and a part of, something bigger than myself in my vintage instruments.

IMHO, this is a matter of perspective. Some people find value in exact tolerances and perfectly bookmatched or colored woods. That is cool if that makes you feel like your instrument is filled with life and great music, then it will make great music for you. I find value in something less than perfect, made in another time, which has survived despite it having fallen out of favor, and changing hands many times...... and still it sings loud and clear when given the chance.

mm stan
10-15-2010, 12:01 PM
Aloha All,
Whenever I buy an vintage ukulele, my criteria is if it looks nice it must sound nice too or I'll just walk away from it...or it'll just be a dust collector..
Another thing, new high end ukes cannot replicate it the mellowing of the ukes tone throughout decades...no matter what high technology
precise cutting and shaping tools they have now...it is up to you to find the gems, and distance yourself from the bad ones...or you will
have a bad experience and have a bad opinion on vintage ukuleles or anything you buy...Good Luck, and happy hunting!!! MM Stan..

Theowlandtheoctopus
10-15-2010, 12:23 PM
I'm assuming it's mostly the collector mentality, which I understand, but I'm so abusive to instruments I stick to cheaper models. I also like the inconsistencies one gets with the cheaper, or more damaged instruments.

Chris Tarman
10-15-2010, 01:22 PM
I have a friend who loves to at least take a look at every vintage instrument he passes by. I, personally, am not a fan of vintage instruments. Other people see history, connections to the past, classics, rare, etc. I just see someone else's old beat up instrument. I'd like to have an old one someday, but I want it to be one that I had when it was new and got all of it's seasoning from me.

My '77 Jazz Bass is like that. I bought it in '99 from Elderly Instruments. It had the owner's manual in the case, and the case and the bass both looked brand new. It was like someone had bought it to learn to play, then stuck it in a closet after a couple of months. Now that I've had it for 11 years, there are a few nicks and dings which are all from me, and there's some bare wood starting to show through the paint where my right forearm rests on the body. I'm pretty proud of that paint wear, I must say!

Chris Tarman
10-15-2010, 01:38 PM
And yes, vintage instruments can be kind of fussy. I wouldn't want one as my everyday player. That's why I have more new ukes than vintage ukes. And yes, modern instrument construction, with exact tolerances and what not can make some really spectacular looking and sounding instruments. But to me it is very cool to have an instrument that sounds really good that was made without computers or micrometers. Not that there's anything wrong with the new methods, mind you.

Waterguy
10-15-2010, 03:00 PM
In some cases, it's all about the sound you love. I get teased by one of my CT uke buddies because whenever we all get together I only bring my Kanile'a K1T. I have other ukes, I bring it because I love it. The funny thing is that she pretty much always brings just one of hers. She has some nice ukes, including a Koaloha. What she always seems to be playing though is a vintage Martin. Her opinion is that the modern Hawaiian made ukes always sound pretty but the old Martin sounds pretty when it needs to and ugly when that is what's called for. Not a collector thing, just a sound thing.

70sSanO
10-15-2010, 03:14 PM
Old growth is still very available in most species....


Bruce, being in the business, you would surely know.

I just keep hearing stuff like mahogany is tough and expensive to get, so spanish cedar or sapele is being used. Maybe the old growth is there, but manufacturers seem to be looking for cheaper alternatives.

John

Jerlial Prophet
10-15-2010, 03:52 PM
My '77 Jazz Bass is like that. I bought it in '99 from Elderly Instruments. It had the owner's manual in the case, and the case and the bass both looked brand new. It was like someone had bought it to learn to play, then stuck it in a closet after a couple of months. Now that I've had it for 11 years, there are a few nicks and dings which are all from me, and there's some bare wood starting to show through the paint where my right forearm rests on the body. I'm pretty proud of that paint wear, I must say!

Sorry Chirs, I just have to do it:

2. Those who don't

Chris Tarman
10-15-2010, 06:04 PM
Sorry Chirs, I just have to do it:

2. Those who don't

Awww, MAN! You RUINED it!!!!

Hippie Dribble
10-15-2010, 07:50 PM
I can't speak for others, but I agree with what Bill said. I own several vintage ukes for these (potentially shallow, but honest) reasons:

(i) the prestige / status - I wanted a Martin and a Kamaka cause I thought those were the vintage ukes you just had to have if you were a "serious" collector
(ii) the history
(iii) appearance
(iv) potential resale value

Though I would have loved to, I've never bought one based on how they sounded, cause where I live, you just have no choice but to take a shot and buy online...

That said, I could add two further points:

(i) I've always been too scared to take them out and play them, only rarely, for fear of damaging them or scratching them!, and
(ii) With experience I have come to prefer the sound of modern ukes better anyway!

hmmmm, so why did I bother...? :o

spruce
10-16-2010, 03:27 AM
Bruce, being in the business, you would surely know.

I just keep hearing stuff like mahogany is tough and expensive to get, so spanish cedar or sapele is being used. Maybe the old growth is there, but manufacturers seem to be looking for cheaper alternatives.

Yep.
That's a good example, and one we see in ukes a lot....

Problem is that back in the day we used this stuff like it grew on trees or something... ;)

I remember when koa was $1.80 a B.F., and the curly was mixed in with the unfigured stuff...
There was a mill on the big island that was milling koa like there was no tomorrow, and shipping it to the CONUS...
It wasn't till they went out of business that the prices skyrocketed, and better care of the resource resulted...

Lucky we don't need that much wood to build a good ukulele...

Paul December
10-16-2010, 02:31 PM
Serious pianists avoid vintage instruments like the plague.

strumsilly
10-16-2010, 03:03 PM
I was happy playing my kalas until i acquired a 50's martin. my koa kala is much prettier, but the martin sound blows it away.

adam2180
10-16-2010, 04:32 PM
Well....http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs077.ash2/37167_10150307716830433_763855432_15336985_6906899 _n.jpg

spruce
10-16-2010, 05:29 PM
Well....http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs077.ash2/37167_10150307716830433_763855432_15336985_6906899 _n.jpg

Beautiful...
What is it?

RyanMFT
10-16-2010, 07:45 PM
(i) I've always been too scared to take them out and play them, only rarely, for fear of damaging them or scratching them!, and
(ii) With experience I have come to prefer the sound of modern ukes better anyway!

Wow Eugene, it bums me out that you don't play your vintage ukes! I feel vintage uke's are old and beautiful, should be conserved, but they are still musical instruments and were made to make music. I feel like it is a terrible waste not to play a vintage uke! I recently got a really early ukulele (1900), similar to those I have seen in exhibits in museums. I play it every day. I am gentle but I feel like it is at its best when it is being played.

I guess people are right, older ukulele's can need a little adjustment, repair, or extra care but that is all part of the fun for me.

adam2180
10-17-2010, 02:15 AM
Beautiful...
What is it?

Supertone! Beautyful Mahogany on this one.

allie
10-20-2010, 08:23 AM
Thanks for all the replies! I guess it's a matter of personal preference, and I suppose some people like vintage things because it reminds them of their past? Ah well I was just wondering because the only other instrument I play is piano and to be honest I really dislike playing on old pianos.. But I don't know if that's just me. They don't sound as nice (in my opinion) and I guess another problem is if it's out of tune, you can't just adjust the gears like you would on the uke because pianos are a lot more difficult to tune and it takes way longer.
Thanks again for all your thoughts!