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Tudorp
11-11-2010, 01:45 AM
As a veteran myself, I want to extend my warmest thanks to all who served, and who are serving now. You all are brother's and sister's in service of our country.

Thank You, and God bless each one of you.

mm stan
11-11-2010, 02:04 AM
Aloha Bruddah Tudorp,
I second that...for sure!!! and to their famalies whom lost loves ones and or who are injured because of duty..
Mahalo for putting yourselves in harms way, and making sure we all have our freedom...
You all will not be forgotten....:)

Kanaka916
11-11-2010, 02:09 AM
To those who have served and those who are now serving . . . Much Mahalos for your sacrifices and your dedication to duty.

The_Oddness_of_It_All
11-11-2010, 05:17 AM
Words can not express my thanks to those who gave up everything to serve their country.

ukecantdothat
11-11-2010, 05:20 AM
To all veterans, I salute you! Thanks for your sacrifice.

itsme
11-11-2010, 09:10 AM
Thank you to all who have served.


What is a Veteran?

Some veterans bear visible signs of their service: a missing limb, a jagged scar, a certain look in the eye.

Others may carry the evidence inside them: a pin holding a bone together, a piece of shrapnel in the leg - or perhaps another sort of inner steel: the soul's ally forged in the refinery of adversity.

Except in parades, however, the men and women who have kept America safe wear no badge or emblem.

You can't tell a vet just by looking.

He is the cop on the beat who spent six months in Saudi Arabia sweating two gallons a day making sure the armored personnel carriers didn't run out of fuel.

He is the barroom loudmouth, dumber than five wooden planks, whose overgrown frat-boy behavior is outweighed a hundred times in the cosmic scales by four hours of exquisite bravery near the 38th parallel.

She - or he - is the nurse who fought against futility and went to sleep sobbing every night for two solid years in Da Nang.

He is the POW who went away one person and came back another - or didn't come back AT ALL.

He is the Quantico drill instructor who has never seen combat - but has saved countless lives by turning slouchy, no-account rednecks and gang members into Marines, and teaching them to watch each other's backs.

He is the parade - riding Legionnaire who pins on his ribbons and medals with a prosthetic hand.

He is the career quartermaster who watches the ribbons and medals pass him by.

He is the three anonymous heroes in The Tomb Of The Unknowns, whose presence at the Arlington National Cemetery must forever preserve the memory of all the anonymous heroes whose valor dies
unrecognized with them on the battlefield or in the ocean's sunless deep.

He is the old guy bagging groceries at the supermarket - palsied now and aggravatingly slow - who helped liberate a Nazi death camp and who wishes all day long that his wife were still alive to hold him when the nightmares come.

He is an ordinary and yet an extraordinary human being - a person who offered some of his life's most vital years in the service of his country, and who sacrificed his ambitions so others would not have to sacrifice theirs.

He is a soldier and a savior and a sword against the darkness, and he is nothing more than the finest, greatest testimony on behalf of the finest, greatest nation ever known.

So remember, each time you see someone who has served our country, just lean over and say Thank You. That's all most people need, and in most cases it will mean more than any medals they could have been awarded or were awarded.

Two little words that mean a lot, "THANK YOU".

"It is the soldier, not the reporter, Who has given us freedom of the press. It is the soldier, not the poet, Who has given us freedom of speech. It is the soldier, not the campus organizer, Who has given us the freedom to demonstrate. It is the soldier, Who salutes the flag, Who serves beneath the flag, and whose coffin is draped by the flag, who allows the protestor to burn the flag."

- Father Denis Edward O'Brien/USMC

Tudorp
11-11-2010, 09:18 AM
One of my daughters friends at school sent me this. My daughter told me her friend wrote it herself, I didn't confirm that, it's pretty deep for a 13 year old, but if she did, it is pretty cool.

"Veteran is someone, who at one point in their life, wrote a blank check
payable to the United States of America for an amount up to, and
including, their life. That is beyond honor, and there are way too many
people in this country who no longer remember that."

ukecantdothat
11-11-2010, 09:57 AM
One of my daughters friends at school sent me this. My daughter told me her friend wrote it herself, I didn't confirm that, it's pretty deep for a 13 year old, but if she did, it is pretty cool.

"Veteran is someone, who at one point in their life, wrote a blank check
payable to the United States of America for an amount up to, and
including, their life. That is beyond honor, and there are way too many
people in this country who no longer remember that."

That is beyond deep...

DAPuke
11-11-2010, 10:50 AM
Mahalo to the vet's!!!
DAP

lozarkman
11-11-2010, 11:01 AM
On bended Knee and tears in our hearts do we thank the hundreds of thousands that over our history have given their lives and part of themselves that we may have the freedoms we have today. May we NEVER forget the sacrifices made by all veterans for the preservation of our wonderful country. Lozark

BobN
11-11-2010, 12:07 PM
My Grandpa lost a leg in the battle in the Argonne. He was in a wagon load of dead soldiers. A French nun said "This man is still alive."

My Grandma was an officer and a nurse in the WACs.

Nov 11 is WWI armistice day also know as "Remembrance Day" in the British Empire.

Monuments can never do justice to the sacrifice. I like the name "Remembrance Day".

koalition
11-11-2010, 01:29 PM
I reflect on this day thinking back on my days when I served in the US Army, of my brother's service in the USAF, of my Dad's service in the USMC, and of the tours of duty that my niece and 4 nephews formerly and currently serve in the USAF and the USMC. It was never about the money, but ALWAYS about HONOR and DUTY. God Bless America!

ricdoug
11-11-2010, 05:04 PM
Master Gunnery Sergeant Ric Douglas USMC '68 ('Nam) to '92 ('Storm) recon scout sniper and MCMAP's (Marine Corps Martial Arts Program instructor). You are correct, koalition, it has never been about the money. I'm thankful to the Lord for being alive. Many of my comrades have fallen, not in vain. Ric

armytrucker77
11-11-2010, 05:42 PM
Thank you all for supporting us veterans...I thank the vets to and for all they are done and will do.

ichadwick
11-12-2010, 01:06 AM
In Canada, we call Nov. 11th "Remembrance Day", and we wear a red poppy to show our support. It's from the John McRae 1915 poem, In Flanders Field.

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.
Every year I go to the local cenotaph for the ceremony honouring the veterans and the fallen in wars and combat since WWI. It's very moving. Both my parents and my wife's parents were vets of WWII. My mother lost a brother on the Atlantic convoys. My grandfather served in WWI on the Aurora, a cruiser. We will not forget.

I am always delighted by the number of people who show up at the cenotaph for the ceremony, but disappointed by the number of people who don't even take two minutes to observe a moment of silence at 11 a.m. on this day.

joeybug
11-12-2010, 03:11 AM
In Canada, we call Nov. 11th "Remembrance Day", and we wear a red poppy to show our support. It's from the John McRae 1915 poem, In Flanders Field.

Every year I go to the local cenotaph for the ceremony honouring the veterans and the fallen in wars and combat since WWI. It's very moving. Both my parents and my wife's parents were vets of WWII. My mother lost a brother on the Atlantic convoys. My grandfather served in WWI on the Aurora, a cruiser. We will not forget.

I am always delighted by the number of people who show up at the cenotaph for the ceremony, but disappointed by the number of people who don't even take two minutes to observe a moment of silence at 11 a.m. on this day.

In the UK, it's also called Rememberance Day...I always observe the 2 min silence for the fallen, for the fighting, for the ones who give up everything and sometimes lose, but they all fight for our freedom and it is an honour to me, to remember them, to know them, to see them on the streets selling poppies. May we never forget those who fought, fight and those who didn't come home.

From the bottom of my heart, thank you for all you do.