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DAPuke
12-01-2010, 11:48 AM
Hi song writers and future song writers,
I am thinking I may take a stab at writing a song.

Do you copywrite your songs?
Is it necessary?
If yes, how? If no, why not?

Thanks folks,
Don

Dougf
12-01-2010, 01:07 PM
Here's a quote from this link http://www.copyrightauthority.com/song-copyright.htm :

"
Under the Berne Convention, most countries have a deal where as soon as your song, music or lyrics are written down in a tangiable form -then they are already copyrighted. You don't need to do anything.
"

I think this would include an upload to YouTube.

You can register your copyright, and a google search turns up places that will do this for as little as $5. Registering would presumably give you added protection in the event you are infringed.

However, speaking for myself, the chances that someone might actually make money off of one of my songs is so remote, it's not even worth the $5 to me. If it really turned out to be significant money, a lawyer would probably take the case on contingency. Anything else and I would probably be glad just to have someone cover my songs.

deach
12-01-2010, 03:12 PM
Here's a quote from this link http://www.copyrightauthority.com/song-copyright.htm :

"
Under the Berne Convention, most countries have a deal where as soon as your song, music or lyrics are written down in a tangiable form -then they are already copyrighted. You don't need to do anything.
"

I think this would include an upload to YouTube.

You can register your copyright, and a google search turns up places that will do this for as little as $5. Registering would presumably give you added protection in the event you are infringed.

However, speaking for myself, the chances that someone might actually make money off of one of my songs is so remote, it's not even worth the $5 to me. If it really turned out to be significant money, a lawyer would probably take the case on contingency. Anything else and I would probably be glad just to have someone cover my songs.

The guy who wrote "Pants on the Ground" probably didn't think it would be worth $5....until it was being played everywhere.

Dougf
12-01-2010, 03:34 PM
The guy who wrote "Pants on the Ground" probably didn't think it would be worth $5....until it was being played everywhere.

My guess is that Larry Platt has some pretty smart lawyers working on this right now, and he'll probably do just fine. I would consider myself extremely lucky to have just one of the numerous people who have covered "Pants on the Ground" to cover one of mine, not to mention the 7 million views on YT.

Dane
12-01-2010, 03:47 PM
I put copyright notices on everything of mine (trained from my photography), just in case something happens in the future, I can say, hey... I had a notice on it. And that way I can at least get reparations. I don't know how it works with music, but with photography, you can put the notice and get reparations, if you ACTUALLY send it in to the copyright office, you are allowed additional money. I put mine in the descriptions of my videos, but they should really be on the video itself. I think krabbers does them on his actual videos.

DAPuke
12-02-2010, 07:19 AM
However, speaking for myself, the chances that someone might actually make money off of one of my songs is so remote, it's not even worth the $5 to me. If it really turned out to be significant money, a lawyer would probably take the case on contingency. Anything else and I would probably be glad just to have someone cover my songs.Yeah, If anyone wanted to cover anything I'd write I'd be flattered, Thanks Doug for the link and your opinion,
DAP

PoisonDart
12-02-2010, 07:21 AM
I don't send it in, but I mark 'em. I agree with Utah Phillips about how to be an ethical musician/songwriter, but I think some of that involves reserving rights so that you can have some control over how the song is used commercially.

DAPuke
12-02-2010, 07:22 AM
I put copyright notices on everything of mine (trained from my photography), just in case something happens in the future, I can say, hey... I had a notice on it. And that way I can at least get reparations. I don't know how it works with music, but with photography, you can put the notice and get reparations, if you ACTUALLY send it in to the copyright office, you are allowed additional money. I put mine in the descriptions of my videos, but they should really be on the video itself. I think krabbers does them on his actual videos.Thanks Dane, I'm not gonna worry about it. I'll check one of your vids for what to write.
DAP
DAP

DAPuke
12-02-2010, 07:24 AM
Thanks PoisonDart, sounds like I don't need to be overly concerned about it.
DAP

DAPuke
12-02-2010, 07:27 AM
The guy who wrote "Pants on the Ground" probably didn't think it would be worth $5....until it was being played everywhere.I'd be ok with his situation! Thanks,
DAP

DAPuke
12-02-2010, 07:29 AM
Hell, I can't even spell it! Thanks you guy's
DAP

lindydanny
12-02-2010, 08:35 AM
What about the flip side, though? How many of you who post videos of songs by other artists properly attribute the songs to their original artists?

I ask this because I've had several conversations with guitar players about infringement and playing at local bars. There is a ton of precedence for you to basically be ruined by the music industry for even playing a song on the street corner with your case open. However, the actual likely hood of this happening is amazing low, there is still the risk.

~DB

lindydanny
12-02-2010, 08:54 AM
Of course, I say the above and then go over and read this from the FAQ on www.ascap.com:

"12. Aren't musicians, entertainers and DJ's responsible for obtaining permission for music they perform?

Some people mistakenly assume that musicians and entertainers must obtain licenses to perform copyrighted music or that businesses where music is performed can shift their responsibility to musicians or entertainers. The law says all who participate in, or are responsible for, performances of music are legally responsible. Since it is the business owner who obtains the ultimate benefit from the performance, it is the business owner who obtains the license. Music license fees are one of the many costs of doing business."

~DB

P.S.: I hope that isn't copyrighted!!! lol

Dane
12-02-2010, 09:06 AM
What about the flip side, though? How many of you who post videos of songs by other artists properly attribute the songs to their original artists?

I ask this because I've had several conversations with guitar players about infringement and playing at local bars. There is a ton of precedence for you to basically be ruined by the music industry for even playing a song on the street corner with your case open. However, the actual likely hood of this happening is amazing low, there is still the risk.

~DB

All it takes is one person who dislikes you.

The copyright I post is "All images, music, and compositions are ęDane Mehl" I hope this covers me, but as I said, my copyright knowledge is in the photography field. I add the images part because I sometimes include photos that are my own work. Public domain images like the ones from NASA though, I make sure that I state where they came from, and you should make sure that it doesn't seem like you are copyrighting those images.

DAPuke
12-02-2010, 10:19 AM
What about the flip side, though? How many of you who post videos of songs by other artists properly attribute the songs to their original artists?
~DBI did (on the only vid I posted) what I see others (most) do, note the title and the original artist. I hope that does it. I don't think the entertainment world has anything to fear from the likes of me:)

Ukulele Jim
12-02-2010, 11:18 AM
I register my songs with the copyright office.

I'm also considering joining ASCAP or BMI, not sure which.

DAPuke
12-02-2010, 01:09 PM
I register my songs with the copyright office.

I'm also considering joining ASCAP or BMI, not sure which.What kind of fees are associated with the copyright office?
Thanks Jim for chiming in,
DAP

Ukulele Jim
12-02-2010, 01:33 PM
It was $35 to copyright an entire album and its contents. And I didn't have to mail anything in, I was able to upload digital files for all the tracks and submit payment electronically. Pretty easy.

LynnMarie
12-03-2010, 02:53 PM
You can copy right your work for free at: http://myfreecopyright.com/

You can upload lyrics or recorded copies of your songs. The site uploads your work on to their server and time/date stamps it. You will get an email confirming it was recorded and you can check or update information on the site at any time.

However, no matter how many steps you take to protect your work it is an expensive legal battle to prove you are due royalties.

DAPuke
12-04-2010, 09:55 AM
Hi LynnMarie, thanks for the link, not too difficult.
DAP

Ukulele Jim
12-04-2010, 11:18 AM
Myfreecopyright looks interesting, but I don't know how well that'd work in court. I prefer the peace of mind from registering with the gov.

JT_Ukes
12-04-2010, 12:03 PM
I prefer the peace of mind from registering with the gov.

not a phrase you hear much these days...

Ukulele Jim
12-04-2010, 07:21 PM
Context is everything.

Ukulele Jim
12-07-2010, 12:49 PM
Another consideration: Although U.S. copyright law doesn’t require that a work must be registered with the government to get copyright protection, you can get statutory benefits, such as the ability to recover your legal costs if you prevail in a lawsuit, if you register it within a few months of publication. For musicians, that publish date is usually when a CD is released. Take a little time before the album is released to register both the music (form PA) and the recording itself (form SR) with the U.S. Copyright Office as a collection so you get the full benefit of registration as it is more cost-effective to register them as a whole than each song separately.