PDA

View Full Version : first 5 ukes



santacruzer
12-04-2010, 10:35 AM
Here is a picture of my first 5 ukes. All have one piece sides and bindings. 4 different shapes, 4 different woods for back and sides, and 3 different string lengths.4 have spruce tops cut by Rich Turner from an aircraft spar, 1 is cedar I resawed myself. All ukes are my own design. I'd like to thank all the generous people in this forum for thier inspiration and helpful ideas that helped in making these ukes possible. John

Kalihonu
12-04-2010, 11:20 AM
Aloha santacruzer, wow you did a really great job on those ukes. They look awesome, bet they sound sweet too. Thanks for sharing.

UkeforJC
12-04-2010, 11:23 AM
wow...John,
these are very very nice work. You must love pineapple a lot.
I would like to build a pineapple next.

When you said that these are your design, did you mean that you draw the plans?

santacruzer
12-04-2010, 12:21 PM
I just made 4 different forms for the body shapes I wanted to try to make. I use light weight bracing. The lining on all of them are solid. I'll probably spend the rest of my life working on fine tuning the aesthetics. John

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
12-04-2010, 12:33 PM
I just made 4 different forms for the body shapes I wanted to try to make. I use light weight bracing. The lining on all of them are solid. I'll probably spend the rest of my life working on fine tuning the aesthetics. John

Those look great santacruzer. I would suggest spending time on getting optimum sound. I see a lot of beginner builders craft some incredible looking instruments that fall short in the sound department. You have a lot of opportunities to learn where you are.
Keep it up and have fun.

mm stan
12-04-2010, 01:38 PM
Aloha John,
They look awesome..how do they sound...Wow are you selling them??? Thanks for sharing...MM Stan..

Hippie Dribble
12-04-2010, 01:44 PM
Aloha John,
They look awesome..how do they sound...Wow are you selling them??? Thanks for sharing...MM Stan..

hi John. They are beautiful looking pineapples. Congratulations on the builds. Stan's question was mine also: were you going to sell them?

santacruzer
12-04-2010, 02:54 PM
Stan and Eugene,
It will be a while before I would sell any. IMHO 4 out of 5 sound very good. Intonation on all is also good. The 2nd uke I made had the bridge and plate too close to the butt plate which decreases the volume a bit. Its part of the learning curve. I am going to donate uke #5 to a school in the Puna District. Thanks for your interest. John

Dane
12-04-2010, 04:05 PM
Can you do a pic of your headstocks? I really like some of those curly ones. They all look very nice. 4 concert and a soprano?

thehappyukulele
12-04-2010, 04:48 PM
Very nice John. I love seeing the whole group together. I build in a similar way with one piece sides and a modified pineapple shape. I especially like the inlays around the soundholes. They really unify the group. Terrific.

Dave Iriguchi

ksquine
12-04-2010, 04:58 PM
very nice....5 real beauties. I like those rosettes alot.

santacruzer
12-04-2010, 05:46 PM
1816818167here is the headstocks and some of the rosettes. All I still see are my mistakes. John

ADD
12-04-2010, 06:58 PM
1816818167here is the headstocks and some of the rosettes. All I still see are my mistakes. John

That critical voice is always so loud. But if you have to point out any mistakes, then it's not a mistake, it's there to make it unique and interesting. It can teach us how to deal with an imperfect self in an imperfect world. (Unless it effects intonation/playability.) Then as Chuck suggest work on getting optimum sound. Couldn't help myself.

They are beautiful, all five of them. You did an incredible job.

Dane
12-04-2010, 07:21 PM
1816818167here is the headstocks and some of the rosettes. All I still see are my mistakes. John

Mistakes are good, it makes you strive to be better, but at the same time it keeps you humble, and it shows that it was made by hand =)

bluesuke
12-05-2010, 05:11 AM
I am a little curious about how you joined your tops. It looks like the are set inside the sides

santacruzer
12-05-2010, 06:15 AM
Hey Bluesuke,
Top and bottom are glued on top of the sides and solid linings with either Titebond or LMI glue. The press to hold them in place while drying is based on the Dave G. of Waverly Street design. The routing of the bindings is done with the StewMac Dremel Binding Router Guide installed through the bottom of a 3/4 inch plywood base via a 1 1/8" hole so it creates a small router table and with a small notch in the plywood top where the adjustment screw is, to make the binding cutter the same height as the plywood table. So far, it has worked good on ukes with flat tops and bottoms. The bindings are lace wood, bamboo, a mystery wood that was sold as mahogany and the last one used plastic bindings from LMI. The thickness of the bindings was from about .058" to .062" and scraped or sanded to final thickness. (Bamboo and plastic both bent without having to be pre-formed.) John

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
12-05-2010, 04:11 PM
. I am going to donate uke #5 to a school in the Puna District.

Good for you. They going to the Hawaiian charter school?

santacruzer
12-05-2010, 05:27 PM
Uke #5 is a sapelle mohogany body and side, with Western red cedar top, with rosette out of 4 woods. As of earlier this year, the charter school in Puna, on the Big Island now has a ukulele class taught by Andy Andrews. I'm just helping out. John