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mendel
12-16-2010, 05:33 AM
I was struming away on my lunch break earlier and I found myself playing C, Am, F, G7. I like to strum it in different patterns, and I was curious what chord progressions you guys like to play around with. Any favorites?

Rockabilly
12-16-2010, 05:38 AM
I'm fond of that progression myself : )

kenikas
12-16-2010, 05:53 AM
I do that one a lot myself, but my favorites have to be the Hawaiian vamps. C= D7, G7, C ; D= E7, A7, D ; F= G7, C7, F ; G= A7, D7, G ; and A= B7, E7, A.

mendel
12-16-2010, 05:57 AM
Kenikas- This may be naive of me, but what do you mean by "Hawaiian Vamps"? Also, I notice that you progressions have only 3 chords in them. Is that the norm, and my favorite happens to have 4, or are there usually 4 chords in a progression? I have heard in the past that it has something to do with the root chord, arpeggios, and then a 7th note from the same key. Perhaps that was incorrect.

Ron
12-16-2010, 06:45 AM
I'm fond of A7 D7 G7 C and C E7 A7 D7 (from which you can go to F G7 C

In a different Mood D C Bm Am G is a nice riff

DAPuke
12-16-2010, 06:55 AM
Mendel,
Kenikas- This may be naive of me, but what do you mean by "Hawaiian Vamps"? Good question. Here is an answer from our UU member Mitch, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BJewlLxdLLo.
I like the C, Am, F, G7 too. I tend to play songs and have favorite sections. like, G-Em-Am-D7. Thats from the first part of "The Rainbow Connection"
DAP

SailingUke
12-16-2010, 07:09 AM
Kenikas- This may be naive of me, but what do you mean by "Hawaiian Vamps"? Also, I notice that you progressions have only 3 chords in them. Is that the norm, and my favorite happens to have 4, or are there usually 4 chords in a progression? I have heard in the past that it has something to do with the root chord, arpeggios, and then a 7th note from the same key. Perhaps that was incorrect.

I don't believe a chord progression is 4 chords. I usually think of a chord progression as the chords in a song. While 1 & 2 chord song are around one may not think of them as a progression.
One of the most common progressions is the I,IV,V7 (key of C - C, F & G7).
It is used in countless songs, is the basis of most rock & roll, country, folk and blues.

Hawaiian vamps are the II,V(7),I. You will hear them as an intro in a lot of Hawaiian songs. It sets the tempo for the dancers as well as the band.
They can also used as an outro/ending.

It is probably worth the time to learn the theory of chord numbers. I also believe in practicing chord progressions in different keys.
It not only helps in transitions, but helps you begin to hear chord changes. By practicing the chords in a particular key you will learn to move easily from chord to chord.

It is important to be able to transition between C & F or C & G7. You will find these chords together often.
There won't be many times you need to go from C to an Ebm7 for example.

I also suggest learning the "circle of 5th's" progression in various keys, it sound cool and is fun too. (key of C - C,E7,A7,D7,G7,C)

good luck and keep noodling around, it can fun and productive.

kryztoff
12-16-2010, 07:20 AM
i like to use this one Bm F#m G#m G

mendel
12-16-2010, 07:22 AM
Do you recommend any resources, articles or otherwise about the theory of chord numbers? I am finding that in my playing it is obvious that the design of the Uke is genius because of how easily chords that play well with each other are oriented so well in relation to one another on the instrument. I am enjoying playing, but I am the type of person that always wants to not just play, but also be a "student of the game" so to speak.

Uncle Rod Higuchi
12-16-2010, 07:31 AM
I'm partial to C, Cdim, Dm7, G7.

However, I also like to play:

F, Dm, Gm7, C7, F, F7, Bb, Bbm6 (0333), F, D7, G7, C7, F, A7, Dm, C7, F, F7, Bb, Bbm6, F, D7, G7, C7, F, barre fret 3-4-5.

I do the above at 1 or 2 strums for each chord and 1 strum for each of the barre chords on the 3rd-4th-5th frets.

Keep uke'in',

kenikas
12-16-2010, 07:47 AM
Do you recommend any resources, articles or otherwise about the theory of chord numbers? I am finding that in my playing it is obvious that the design of the Uke is genius because of how easily chords that play well with each other are oriented so well in relation to one another on the instrument. I am enjoying playing, but I am the type of person that always wants to not just play, but also be a "student of the game" so to speak.
I'm glad others got to answer you before I got back, they did a much better explaination than I could. A couple of good chord references that I've found usefull are "Understanding Ukulele Chords" (Mel Bay book), and "Fretboard Roadmap for Ukulele". Both give a good foundation on chords without going to deep into music theory.

Mandarb
12-16-2010, 08:24 AM
Lately I have been noodling around with F, Am, Dm, Bb.

Hippie Dribble
12-16-2010, 08:52 AM
Lately I have been noodling around with F, Am, Dm, Bb.

2nd Mandarb's favorite chords!

At the moment mine is F, F7, Bb, Bbdim, G7, C7, F...typical George Formby type chord pattern!

Also, any minor key pattern sounds great to me, like: Dm, C, Dm, C, Bb, F, C, Dm...ala the ol' folksong "The Cuckoo"

happy strumming mendel!!!

mm stan
12-16-2010, 09:39 AM
Aloha Mendel,
Mine is F, C7, F, F7, Bb, F, C7, F.......and so forth.. G, C, C7, F, G7, C.....another is G, C, C7, F, A7, D7, G... just a few...Have fun and enjoy!!!! MM Stan
Happy Holidays..

mds725
12-16-2010, 10:01 AM
One of my favorite chord progressions comes from the Beatles' song, "All My Loving."

In the key of C, the progression is: Dm, G, C, Am, F, Dm, Bb, G.
(I've played the song in other keys as well, but the key of C seems to fit my limited vocal range the best.)

Here's Ukulele Mike playing this progression (the song begins at 1:58):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy0N7unQDHU

mm stan
12-16-2010, 10:19 AM
One of my favorite chord progressions comes from the Beatles' song, "All My Loving."

In the key of C, the progression is: Dm, G, C, Am, F, Dm, Bb, G.
(I've played the song in other keys as well, but the key of C seems to fit my limited vocal range the best.)

Here's Ukulele Mike playing this progression (the song begins at 1:58):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy0N7unQDHU

Popular beatles progressions for me is F,Gm, C or F, Eb, G... MM Stan..

DAPuke
12-16-2010, 12:02 PM
One of my favorite chord progressions comes from the Beatles' song, "All My Loving."

In the key of C, the progression is: Dm, G, C, Am, F, Dm, Bb, G.
(I've played the song in other keys as well, but the key of C seems to fit my limited vocal range the best.)
Great song I like this too and try to play it every day. The version I play uses G7 instead of G. I'm gonna try it with G when I get home from work. :)
DAP

OldePhart
12-16-2010, 12:17 PM
The chord progression from the Beatle's "Yesterday" is high on my list but I think my all time favorite is the very simple G, Bm, C, D - it's the recurring chord progression used on the Bee Gee's "I Started a Joke." It's a bit unusual to find the third so heavily used in a song in a major key (actually, it's a bit rare to see it at all in popular music), and it really works on this one. It really sounds good on guitar, mandolin, and uke.

The uke version is pretty easy to play if you use the barre G, and super easy to play if you do it as a Gadd9, Bm7, C, D

John

Ron
12-16-2010, 12:32 PM
I don't believe a chord progression is 4 chords. I usually think of a chord progression as the chords in a song. While 1 & 2 chord song are around one may not think of them as a progression.
One of the most common progressions is the I,IV,V7 (key of C - C, F & G7).
It is used in countless songs, is the basis of most rock & roll, country, folk and blues.

Hawaiian vamps are the II,V(7),I. You will hear them as an intro in a lot of Hawaiian songs. It sets the tempo for the dancers as well as the band.
They can also used as an outro/ending.

It is probably worth the time to learn the theory of chord numbers. I also believe in practicing chord progressions in different keys.
It not only helps in transitions, but helps you begin to hear chord changes. By practicing the chords in a particular key you will learn to move easily from chord to chord.

It is important to be able to transition between C & F or C & G7. You will find these chords together often.
There won't be many times you need to go from C to an Ebm7 for example.

I also suggest learning the "circle of 5th's" progression in various keys, it sound cool and is fun too. (key of C - C,E7,A7,D7,G7,C)

good luck and keep noodling around, it can fun and productive.

Very helpful - thanks.
That "circle of 5th's" progression is the basis of a lot of those old school 30' and 40's jazz style songs - All of me for example (...although that has a Dm instead of the D7 on the way down....hmmm)

Bradford
12-16-2010, 12:44 PM
All of the concepts mentioned by SailingUke are explained very well in the book "Understanding Ukulele Chords", which was recommended in this thread. I second that recommendation, it is clear and very easy to understand, it is perfect for those like you who wish to understand why music works the way it does.

Brad

vacuousnacho
12-16-2010, 02:58 PM
I'm a big fan of G, Em, C, and D. My girlfriend and I wrote a song with those chords a few weeks ago.

SuzukHammer
12-16-2010, 03:30 PM
As I am learning scales, I find that I'll then make up chords from those group of notes. then I make progressions. Its backwards but its fun to just hear the variations. I suppose I could figure out the parts from there but, just too much fun noodling in scales.

SailingUke
12-16-2010, 04:15 PM
All of the concepts mentioned by SailingUke are explained very well in the book "Understanding Ukulele Chords", which was recommended in this thread. I second that recommendation, it is clear and very easy to understand, it is perfect for those like you who wish to understand why music works the way it does.

Brad
Thanks, I also recommend the "Fretboard Roadmap" it is a valuble reference for all levels.
There have been many discussions on theory, I don't believe one needs to totally get into it, but whatever theory you learn will help you understand what you are playing. I truly believe you will surpass you expectations by understanding music theory.
Knowing the musical alphabet "A,A#/Bb,B,C" etc. and what chords are in what key will get you off the beginner plateau so many of us get stuck on.
Don't make it hard work, keep strumming and having fun, but engage your brain into the act and you will be surprised.

Happy Monkey
12-19-2010, 07:50 AM
bump for a great thread!

mds725
12-19-2010, 10:02 AM
Great song I like this too and try to play it every day. The version I play uses G7 instead of G. I'm gonna try it with G when I get home from work. :)
DAP

I'm curious to know how using G instead of G7 sounded to you. I tried G7 and didn't hear a big difference, although I think I prefer the contrast of Dm to G over Dm to G7. Maybe I'm just more accustomed to it because it's the progression I play. Please let me know what you thought!

mendel
12-19-2010, 01:05 PM
Dm to G7 was an easier and smoother transition for mr than Dm to G. The sound difference was barely audible to me. Maybe it's my untrained ear, my playing, or my Uke. Not sure.

beardco
12-19-2010, 02:43 PM
I also think Fred Sokolov's Fretboard Roadmap books are a great learning reference and insight into music. There's even a DVD for the guitar version. At the bookstore today I saw a book on how to write music for the guitar. It looked interesting and also useful for the ukulele.

mendel
12-20-2010, 02:27 PM
New favorite.

Bb, F, C, F

Tom Petty "Wildflowers". My strumming needs work, but it is a really pretty sounding song.maybe someone good enough to do it justice can post a YouTube video of it.

AlohaUlulani15
12-20-2010, 03:17 PM
Am, F, Bb and C7 is my favorite(:

Coconut Willie
12-21-2010, 06:44 AM
I do that one a lot myself, but my favorites have to be the Hawaiian vamps. C= D7, G7, C ; D= E7, A7, D ; F= G7, C7, F ; G= A7, D7, G ; and A= B7, E7, A.

I like the sound of those Hawaiian vampls as well.

UkeToaster
12-21-2010, 08:08 AM
my most recent ones are: e7sus5 f#m bm and a9, em7 d7 D am, Dsus D11 amsus gsus5. they are great with the right strum :)

bazmaz
12-22-2010, 10:03 PM
For me, lets go right down to basics - standard Blues turnaround in E

Em, Am, Em, D-Am-Em

Can be used to play pretty much most classic rock and roll and blues songs.

clayton56
12-22-2010, 11:45 PM
talk about getting back to basics, some days I am playing G7 to C for hours on end.

I do work with putting little runs and riffs in there but, still.

bazmaz
12-23-2010, 02:43 AM
lol, waiting for the next post now that someone just plays C...!;)

strumsilly
12-23-2010, 03:27 AM
been fooling with D,B7,G,A7 [ Santa baby chords] D,Bm7,Gm7,A7 sound cool too.
Merry Christmas

pdxuke
12-29-2010, 09:37 AM
Hard question to answer since I also think of it as a song, and not chord progression. But lately, my ear is loving the chords in DREAM A LITTLE DREAM:

F, E7, C#7, C7 F, D7, Am7-5, D7 Bb, Bbm6, C#7, C7.

Here's the chart:
www.doctoruke.com/dreamalittledreamofme.pdf

Richie23
12-29-2010, 11:44 AM
Changes regularly, but currently its A#7, A7, Dm, F, C, Gm, C. I'm playing DGBE strung Baritone.

I'm playing http://bdenes.mnsi.net/badseeds/nomore.txt, but use A7 rather than A. Also A#7 is the same as Bb.

mendel
12-29-2010, 02:48 PM
You guys are advanced!!! I am a newbie. I can hit chords like E and B, but it's hard for me!!! I can't wait until I can just throw them into chord progressions!!!

My new fave is C, F, G7, and D.

DAPuke
12-30-2010, 03:04 AM
I'm curious to know how using G instead of G7 sounded to you. I tried G7 and didn't hear a big difference, although I think I prefer the contrast of Dm to G over Dm to G7. Maybe I'm just more accustomed to it because it's the progression I play. Please let me know what you thought!

I myself couldn't hear a big difference between the two chords when played in the progession. I like the sound of most 7th chords compared to the root chord. To hear the difference try playing a G and then a G7, D and D7... I'm with Mendel as far as the progression is easier for me to play. At this point in my playing I pick songs based on how easy the chords are.
DAP

wafflicious
01-03-2011, 12:31 PM
Thats the one for Surf

OldePhart
01-03-2011, 01:53 PM
Was piddling around today during lunch and found myself playing G - Bb - C - G over and over (all majors - and, yeah, G, not F). It sounded strangely familiar, and a really neat progression, but I couldn't figure out what it's from. I'm pretty sure it's either the intro or bridge of some popular song from days gone by - but I never figured it out.

John

mendel
01-03-2011, 02:14 PM
That does sound really familiar. No idea where I heard it though....

franulele
01-03-2011, 02:40 PM
Love Potion #9

A section: Am...Dm...Am...Dm...C...Am...Dm...E7...Am... (repeat)
B section: Dm... .... B7... .... Dm... ....E7 I held my nose, I closed my eyes // I took a drink ///
A section again

Plus many of the common Tin Pan Alley songs have fun chord progressions.

heymak
01-03-2011, 03:23 PM
You guys are advanced!!! I am a newbie. I can hit chords like E and B, but it's hard for me!!! I can't wait until I can just throw them into chord progressions!!!

My new fave is C, F, G7, and D.

I have the same problem, "House of the Rising Sun" is a cool one for beginners; Am, C, D, F Am, C, E7

Still have trouble slamming my fingers into the D shape though.

musicman44
01-03-2011, 03:38 PM
I've played around with C A7 D7 G7 like Rev. Gary Davis' "She's Just Funny That Way."

heymak
01-08-2011, 01:01 PM
Was piddling around today during lunch and found myself playing G - Bb - C - G over and over (all majors - and, yeah, G, not F). It sounded strangely familiar, and a really neat progression, but I couldn't figure out what it's from. I'm pretty sure it's either the intro or bridge of some popular song from days gone by - but I never figured it out.

John
I just started strumming this and it reminds me of Pink Floyd. I just kept hearing in my head "I'll see you on the dark side of the moon."

OldePhart
01-08-2011, 02:05 PM
Actually, I was telling a friend of mine about it on the phone after I wrote that and he started laughing - it's the chords played during the solo on "Free Bird" :o He should know, he played in bar bands for years where seven nights out of ten you've got some drunken idiot yelling "play free bird!" I guess I'm lucky in that I've never played in a bar band so I never learned Free Bird. LOL

Not that Pink Floyd might not have used it as well.

John

mds725
01-08-2011, 03:56 PM
Actually, I was telling a friend of mine about it on the phone after I wrote that and he started laughing - it's the chords played during the solo on "Free Bird"

That's why it sounded familiar! (I learned to play "Free Bird" sort of as a joke, on the theory that someone always requests "Free Bird," no matter who you are or what instrument you're playing. And it's a handy song to play if you ever need to borrow one of those pocket-size lighters.)

heymak
01-09-2011, 03:17 AM
Actually, I was telling a friend of mine about it on the phone after I wrote that and he started laughing - it's the chords played during the solo on "Free Bird" :o He should know, he played in bar bands for years where seven nights out of ten you've got some drunken idiot yelling "play free bird!" I guess I'm lucky in that I've never played in a bar band so I never learned Free Bird. LOL

Not that Pink Floyd might not have used it as well.

John

Now I need to try it with a diferent strum pattern. This is kinda fun for a newby.

spookefoote
01-09-2011, 03:47 AM
C, Cmaj7, F, F(Inversion 2 0 1 3) Whaddaya know! Raindrops keep falling on my head.

luke'nlele
01-09-2011, 04:59 AM
Our friend, uke group leader and fellow UU member, Raygf, sent this link to us in response to a question we had asked about minor chord progressions. It is a guitar site, but for anyone who doesn't know yet, a chord is a chord whether for guitar or uke. That is to say that the chord names are the same . It's only the shapes/ fingerings that are different for the uke. We've been having a lot of fun trying out this great, long list of minor chord progressions.

http://www.guitar-chords.org.uk/chords-key-a-minor.html

mendel
01-11-2011, 02:38 PM
Awesome link!!! I just ordered the Ukulele Fretboard Roadmap as well. I'm looking forward to a ton of strumming.

mendel
01-15-2011, 06:05 AM
Today I am having funplaying Freebird by Skynyrd. I'm also messing around with C, C7, F. From time to time, I'm dropping in D, A7, and G. Then right back around again. I'm going in circles..... Anyone else hooding around with anything easy and interesting???

ZajkoSK
01-15-2011, 10:07 AM
:D I love playing Gm Dm Am

70sSanO
01-15-2011, 10:53 AM
When all else fails and I am just noodling around or trying out a ukulele, I play a progression that follows the vocal progression of the chorus on MercyMe's Finally Home. This is being played a full step lower than the recording, for those who can handle the higher range, move it up 2 frets.

The chorus starts off with an open D. The progression starts by playing a G (barred F on second fret) - add a C# (4th fret A string) - add a D (5th fret A string) - play an Em on the 7th fret (barred Am shape) - play a D on the 9th fret (barred F shape)

Repeat from the G and play the second D on the 5th fret (barred A shape).

You are basically just walking up and down the A string.

You can strum or finger pick. For my it is one of those aah moments.

Have fun!

John

Nickie
01-15-2011, 02:53 PM
Mendel, I'm a beginner, and I think I have to agree with you. If it gets too complicated for me, I'll quit and walk away from it.

mendel
01-15-2011, 03:13 PM
I think you just melted my brain, John. I don't know what your post means at all. I'm hoping the book I ordered will hip me to the game of music theory.

70sSanO
01-15-2011, 03:57 PM
I didn't mean to melt anyone's brain. I am not advanced on theory, I've just played guitar for a lot of years.

Ukulele Fretboard Roadmaps should help with where the notes are located and movable chords.

Once you understand what notes make up a chord, you can play it anywhere.

John

mendel
01-16-2011, 03:03 AM
I'm hopeful that once I read and reread the book, I will have a much better understanding of the fretboard and I can begin to master the space of the fretboard. Once I learn it, I feel like my playing will advance by leaps and bounds. Then the fun really begins!!! Reading music and playing as if I were playing a piano... Note for note. I am excited to be able to mix up finger picking with striking. I can't wait!!!