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View Full Version : Anyone else think baritone ukuleles are evil?



KenjiBeast
12-27-2010, 07:45 PM
Alright first off let me point out the fact that I am a passionate ukulele player, in addition to a devoted guitarist. For both of these instruments, I have undying respect and consistently find myself in awe of the elegance of their design.

That said, I have always lowered my eyebrows at the idea of the baritone ukulele. It destroys the defining aspect of the ukulele- re-entrant tuning, while disposing of the two bass strings of the guitar, a similarly heretical act. I've always been of the opinion that it is less a unified instrument unto itself, and more the crippled bastard offspring of guitar and uke, and is therefore beyond redemption, same as the satan-spawned six string banjo.

The reason I'm posting this is likely because I'm trying to convince myself I still don't want one, but I'm also curious if anyone views the baritone uke similarly. However, I do find myself tempted occasionally. :drool:

Hippie Dribble
12-27-2010, 08:15 PM
Hi Kenji

I have a pretty big uke collection and must confess I've never been tempted by a baritone uke. I have a couple of tenors, and honestly, even they feel a little intimidating to me. Baritones just don't conform to what my idea of a ukulele is, either in size or sound. Too much like little guitars. give me a soprano or concert anyday.

But each to their own. Evil? Well, maybe not. You can still tune the baris GCEA. But they're kind of like the middle sibling who misses out...not the eldest, not the youngest and with a crisis of identity...am I a uke or am I a guitar? Aaaaaargh...thousands of dollars in therapy later...:)

mm stan
12-27-2010, 08:25 PM
Aloha Kenji,
I like my baritones and the richness they provide....you give me any uke and I'll enjoy it....are you kidding..don't put something down because you didn't try it...variety is the spice of life, man!! didn't you know that.....he he.. I'm an equal oppertunity ukulele enabler....lol try it, you'll like it... MM Stan..

southcoastukes
12-27-2010, 08:49 PM
I agree in large part with what you are saying, beast. As a result, our Baritones are a bit more "ukulele":

http://www.southcoastukes.com/index_files/bariuke.htm

kissing
12-27-2010, 08:55 PM
I've always been of the opinion that it is less a unified instrument unto itself, and more the crippled bastard offspring of guitar and uke, and is therefore beyond redemption, same as the satan-spawned six string banjo.

If I've learnt anything from Shakespeare, it's that we love bastards!


But in all seriousness, Baritones are special instruments in their own right.
They are a bit of a misfit, as well as an instrument of all seasons, at the same time.

I prefer baritone ukuleles now. In fact, they're my instrument of choice, more so than regular tuning ukes.
I *can* play guitar, but I much prefer baritone uke for its playability and 'light' sound.
A guitar can't quite sound like a baritone uke, and nor vice versa. It still has an identity in its own right that no other instrument can exactly produce.

And as any uke player would know - there is a special charm in playing a 4-stringed instrument rather than a 6-stringed one.

WS64
12-27-2010, 09:13 PM
It destroys the defining aspect of the ukulele- re-entrant tuning, while disposing of the two bass strings of the guitar, a similarly heretical act.

Agreed.
And the evil thing is therefore not the Baritone ukulele but every ukulele with a non-reentrant tuning (castrated guitars)!

I'm very happy with my two Baritone ukuleles with reentrant tuning.

countrybumpkin
12-27-2010, 09:20 PM
Since you are a passionate uke player and a devoted guitarist, I would think that playing the baritone (even low D) would be the natural progression to round out your musical experience in this family of instruments. It's your destiny... evil or not.

Lexxy
12-27-2010, 09:45 PM
....I have a couple of tenors, and honestly, even they feel a little intimidating to me...

Can i have one of em? I'm not intimidated :P

SweetWaterBlue
12-27-2010, 10:15 PM
I love my baritones, and my re-entrant ukuleles too. For me the baritone represents a guitar I can almost play, as opposed to the 6 string guitar which I can't really play at all.

Teek
12-27-2010, 11:35 PM
Love my bari.. with non wound Worth Brown medium tenor strings tuned up to linear tuning that works on this uke, E A C# F#. No DGBE for me, for that I will just pull out the guitars and mostly ignore the 6th string. I don't care about the key, I can't sing and don't play with anyone else.

John Kavanagh used to say something like "Think of it as a long scale tenor".

Richie23
12-28-2010, 12:37 AM
You know you need one... you know you need one...

Aren't you really just faffing around trying to convince yourself otherwise. I was the same as you, resisted for 18 months, then one day in a spur of madness, I bought a cheap Kala Bari.

Beware its addictive....Now I hardly play anything else... my soprano is in its case for another month, my guitar is gathering dust in the corner, I restrung my tenor dGBE.

harpdog
12-28-2010, 12:42 AM
bought a really dirty Martin baritone for the purpose of cleaning it and selling at a profit. That worked out great.
Of course, while I had it, I played it.
While I could definitely feel the inner tension of thinking "what IS this thing - where are the bass strings - WHY does it exist?" -
I also really enjoyed the voicing and the size.
If it appeals, then have one.

lozarkman
12-28-2010, 02:06 AM
Guess I should chime in as I play my baris the most. My first Bari was/is a Makala mahogany which i just sort of let lie around for a long time, then finally got really interested about a year ago and restrung it to GCEA and really fell in love with it. Then bought a tenor and really liked it. Then bought another Bari, Kala spruce top, and wow, that is my go to ukulele. As to its placement in the uke hierarchy, for me it is just a big tenor. Sounds almost identical to my Kala tenor in C tuning, just a fuller, bigger sound. For me The Bari is easier to fret and pick. I don't have particularly big hands, but for some reason they feel more comfortable on my Baris. It is almost like saying the concert is just a large soprano, and the tenor is just a large concert. All in your perspective, I guess. Buy one, You will like it!!! Lozark

Plainsong
12-28-2010, 02:07 AM
Sometimes you just end up with in-between instruments, like alto-clarinet.

That's funny about tenor guitar. I didn't know there was such a thing until watching A Mighty Wind, and realizing he's not playing a baritone uke... but it has 4 strings... what is this thing?? :)


This is a typical statement from someone who will be buying a baritone ukulele in the near future. I predict a Kamaka or a custom made one for you.
Some articles on the history of the Baritone states that it was actually originally made to help young people learn guitar. The traditional model does not have re-entrant tuning, but it is not hard to set up a baritone with re-entrant tuning. Probably as soon as you realise this, it wont be long before you place an order. There is a shop attached to this bulletin board that sells baritone kamakas, why not just have a little surf there now?
An even more confusing thing is to look at the traditional tuning of a tenor guitar (which is based on a banjo?), and then then the size of a tenor guitar, and then try to work out why there is a tenor guitar and a baritone ukulele.
If you want even more to talk about, show us where it says that a ukulele must have re-entrant tuning.

strumsilly
12-28-2010, 02:11 AM
just got my Gibson baritone set up with southcoast linear[key of C] and It plays and sounds great, some of the chords are a stretch though. I haven't played it enough to decide if I like the low G sound . I tried it with a tenor and went back to g. Starting to play more melody and can see the advantage of having all those low notes. I also have a Gibson guitar [an LG-3] which has lots more bass notes, but it really doesn't sound as sweet as the bari, completely different tone ,it would with steel strings of course. I guess the Bari does fill a slot in the herd, but I usually play what's handy, and that's usually the Makala dolphin that is just laying around because it was so cheap.Anyway,I'll play around with it awhile and if I find I'm not playing it much I'll sell it.

ichadwick
12-28-2010, 02:15 AM
It destroys the defining aspect of the ukulele- re-entrant tuning...
Why? I tune two of my baritones high-d. I think it makes for a lovely sound. It's still a uke, just a little bigger and deeper in pitch. I'm sure there were similar sentiments about the tenor at one time... I mostly play tenor, but for some songs, the lower reach of baritone (coupled with the very limited range of my voice) just works a bit better.

You COULD restring it CGEA, as some do, but I tried it found that a bit shrill, and the strings very tight and inflexible. Besides, it seems to me to be trying to deny the bari's inherent nature.

Papa Tom
12-28-2010, 02:22 AM
To me, it seems like the only "real" ukulele is the soprano. Everything else is just a toy guitar. For those of us who are really frustrated guitar players who can only handle four strings at a time, the concert, tenor, and (most of all) baritone ukes go a long way in contributing to our delusion that we are guitar players!

Richie23
12-28-2010, 03:02 AM
o me, it seems like the only "real" ukulele is the soprano. Everything else is just a toy guitar. For those of us who are really frustrated guitar players who can only handle four strings at a time, the concert, tenor, and (most of all) baritone ukes go a long way in contributing to our delusion that we are guitar players!

...But the Bari is just so much more portable than a guitar. I looked at travel guitars before getting my Bari (Washburn Rover, Baby Taylor, Martin Backpacker) and although all were nice, the Washburn had a weak sound, the Martin cost too much, the Baby Taylor (although it sounded the best) was still too big. I settled on a Kala Bari which cost me half the price of the Rover, had money for a case, a couple of sets of strings, and beer money. It sounds great too.

pepamahina
12-28-2010, 03:16 AM
To me, it seems like the only "real" ukulele is the soprano. Everything else is just a toy guitar. For those of us who are really frustrated guitar players who can only handle four strings at a time, the concert, tenor, and (most of all) baritone ukes go a long way in contributing to our delusion that we are guitar players!

I think you might be on to something Pop. I have had short affairs with a lot of different instruments over the years, and everyone keeps asking me (particularly my mother), "why don't you just learn the guitar dummy?" But guitar just didn't work for me. I like the idea of it, but in reality the damn thing is too big and clunky, and the strings HURT, and my hands aren't nimble enough to make the cool chords. Then I curled up around a ukulele and it just fit! I could play it all day and my fingers didn't bleed, and you can make all of these great sounds so much more easily, and it is such a happy instrument. You can be serious with it or not, it loves you either way. I have to part company with you though when you say that only the soprano is the real thing. I think of the other sizes as just being for different sized people or a different size sound. Small, medium, large, and extra large...you know?

Rockabilly
12-28-2010, 03:55 AM
i had a kala baritone strung with aquilla gcea strings. i really liked it alot...i gave it to a friend trying spread the ukulele love...i think i might get another cuz i liked it that much!

AzMichael
12-28-2010, 05:36 AM
same as the satan-spawned six string banjo.

Hear, hear brother!!! It might be just the thing for killing zombies, but for the love of all that is good and holy, please stop playing those things!

As for the bari, I too have strugled with its unique place in this world. Tried it with Worth non-wound strings...too floppy. Tried it gCEA...nope, I already have tenors. Finally re-strung it with good 'ol baritone strings...two plain, two wound. Turns out, it already knew its place in the world, and it didn't need me to show the way. It seems to have created its own niche, much like "crossover SUV's" and "Burnt Sienna" crayons.

~Michael

Plainsong
12-28-2010, 05:38 AM
I know lots of uke purists, but I never understood it. Other instruments don't suffer the problem. If you like the sound and feel, then that's what you play. There's a funny PDQ Bach recording of Canon in D played as if orchestral instruments never evolved, and it sounds rather hilarious. Instruments can grow and change, very few purists around to say bah humbug and call them toys. Not that the OP is one of those dreaded purists, it's just the bah humbug I feel when any uke players pop in and call themselves purists. You play ukulele, there's no calling yourself a purist. :)

Bill Mc
12-28-2010, 05:39 AM
We are not naive to the existence of evil in this old world Kenji. But evil in a musical instrument ? I think it is safe to say the purchase of a baritone ukulele you crave will not have a corrupting influence on your immortal soul. It may even elevate it to new heights as music is a gift from the divine.

strumsilly
12-28-2010, 06:27 AM
Hear, hear brother!!! It might be just the thing for killing zombies, but for the love of all that is good and holy, please stop playing those things!

As for the bari, I too have strugled with its unique place in this world. Tried it with Worth non-wound strings...too floppy. Tried it gCEA...nope, I already have tenors. Finally re-strung it with good 'ol baritone strings...two plain, two wound. Turns out, it already knew its place in the world, and it didn't need me to show the way. It seems to have created its own niche, much like "crossover SUV's" and "Burnt Sienna" crayons.

~Michael
have you tried Suncoast linear strings, not floppy and sound so sweet, especially when fingerpicking. didn't think the wound/ unwound combo sounded balanced, at least on mine,but it works for classical guitars?

Kem
12-28-2010, 07:08 AM
I know lots of uke purists, but I never understood it. Other instruments don't suffer the problem.

Oddly enough, the other instrument I've really noticed being subject to this kind of thing is the pennywhistle. There are whistlers who won't play anything that costs more than $15 or who scoff at those who claim they suffer from WhOA (Whistle Obsessive Acquisition Disorder, the whistle-related equivalent of UAS) because they are clearly just being seduced by shiny, expensive whistles that don't work any better than cheap, mass-produced ones. On the other hand, there are whistlers who swear by high-end whistles (please understand that the most expensive whistles out there rarely exceed the price of a mid-range ukulele) and roll their eyes at people who stick by their cheap Clarkes and Generations. There's also a vigorous debate raging over what constitutes a "real" whistle tone.

Personally, I think we should all play what feels and sounds good to us and not obsess over whether or not we are violating the essence of a particular instrument. If I'm afraid I'm going to be slapped down because I like the baritone...or the low-G tenor...or the banjolele...or non-Irish whistle music...or jazz on the accordion...or anything else that isn't considered "pure"...I'm simply going to be playing less music.

kmahoney
12-28-2010, 07:15 AM
Oh no....now I am very sad. I play guitar and have been wanting a Uke and hubby bought me one for Christmas...yes.....a Baritone because the sales guys told him it would be easier for a guitar player which it is of course. So now what? Do I return it and get a Soprano because it's evil (it does not appear to be evil and actually sounds very sweet). Please help, I do not wish to be an outcast in the Uke community :)

Bill Mc
12-28-2010, 07:24 AM
You can be an outcast with two of my wonderful grandsons for whom I have purchased baritone ukuleles. You'll be in delightful company.

pdxuke
12-28-2010, 07:29 AM
Oh no....now I am very sad. I play guitar and have been wanting a Uke and hubby bought me one for Christmas...yes.....a Baritone because the sales guys told him it would be easier for a guitar player which it is of course. So now what? Do I return it and get a Soprano because it's evil (it does not appear to be evil and actually sounds very sweet). Please help, I do not wish to be an outcast in the Uke community :)

No! You KEEP it and enjoy it--and revel in the fact you already know the chords.

And then you run out and by a soprano and you'll have both ends of the chain!

This is a great thread, because even though I'm a confirmed soprano player, I DO have a fascination for tenors and baritones. Yesterday I ran to a shop just to play a baritone, to see what it was all about. Now I've played a Martin 00018 (guitar) for 40 years, and I was charmed by the barry. It was kind of like a parlor guitar. I tried to imagine how I'd use it, and I'm still not sure--perhaps playing in a band of ukes, which I don't do :-(. I played the Kala laminate, and it was fine, in tune. I was pleased that I could use guitar chords, but...

It didn't really feel like a uke to me. It wasn't a bad thing, but I tried to imagine if I reached for a uke, what would I reach for? It wasn't the barry in my mind--it was a mahogany soprano. Now, I wanted to try using uke tuning, but the clerk said they were NEVER tuned like that, so I was afraid to do it.

That doesn't mean I don't want one! :-) But I'll probably look for a used beater, or an "entry" Kala.

BUT---to conclude-- I DO NOT think barrys are evil. I think they're charming!

mds725
12-28-2010, 07:32 AM
I read somewhere that the baritone ukulele was developed by Arthur Godfrey, who was a radio entertainer who coverted to television when television became popular. I haven't been able to discover why he did it, but my own theory is that he was a big guy and wanted to have an ukulele that didn't look too "small" for him on television.

As others have pointed out, baritone ukuleles aren't necessarily the only ukuleles that don't have re-entrant tuning. Many people string their tenors with low g, and there have even been posts in this forum about using low g tuning on concerts and sopranos. Are baritone ukuleles with re-entrant tuning less evil than those without it?

I have two baritone ukuleles. Both are strung DGBE, although I'm thinking of restringing one to gCEA. I play tenor the most, but I'm not a guitar player and I wanted to have an instrument that gave me a more guitar-like sound without having to learn to cope with the two additional strings on a guitar and the smaller spaces between the strings. (I still may buy a guitar someday and learn how to play it, but for now I'm trying to focus on getting better at playing the ukulele.) There are songs I play (offhand, the Beatles' "I Should Have Known Better") where I think the baritone sound is just more appropriate. And learning to play a baritone with DGBE tuning -- same chord chapes, different chord names -- has been helping me learn to transpose in my head.

There's also the somewhat related question of whether 6-string and 8-string ukuleles are "evil." They aren't "traditional" ukuleles, but many people like them because they produce a slightly different sound.

So, are baritone ukuleles evil? I think there's a place for them in the ukulele family. Maybe traditionalists could call them something without the word "ukulele" in the name. There's nothing wrong with having a stringed instrument that sounds a little different than other similar stringed instruments. Having said that, though, I have to admit that one of my baritone ukuleles still poops in the house and chews on my shoes.

PoisonDart
12-28-2010, 09:05 AM
No, I don't think Bari's are evil.

I think you're off your rocker, my friend.

I think too many years of guitar has poisoned your mind and created a distinctly inharmonious judgementalism about music. Repeat after me: Music is not a test.

I think after some more time playing Soprano, you'll lighten up and break your mind out of it's panic and on that fine day you'll be able to enjoy all that bari uke can offer.

A world of clear, clean, four part harmony chords await you. I love the close harmony of regular ukulele but sometimes its just not appropriate to cram all the sound in together.

As far as guitar goes, that's a whole 'nother world too. I don't personally understand why anyone plays guitar without learning to play a separate bass line with their thumb. I guess muddy chords fit with some music?

But I would rather find a bass player, myself.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
12-28-2010, 11:06 AM
It's not so much that they are evil but they aren't even ukuleles ;)

Ukuleleblues
12-28-2010, 11:20 AM
I agree they are evil. I have three and they have taken posession of my soul. Help me before I bari again!!!

GrumpyCoyote
12-28-2010, 11:45 AM
Interesting... Normally I ignore these types of threads, but what the hell... I'm in the holiday mood.

As and avid player of both tenor guitars and baritone ukes - as well as reentrant and "low G" ukes, I couldn't disagree more with the premise that baritones are somehow "less than real". They clearly lack the bass range of a guitar - but so does a mandolin, or a reentrant uke for that matter. Different tools for different sounds. Is a flathead screwdriver less of a screwdriver than a phillips? Absurd. Different tools, both screwdrivers. You don't need six strings to make awesome music - and you don't need reentrant tuning. I use reentrant tuning when I want that sound - baritones when I want something else... six strings when I need alternating bass lines... you get the picture. I use what I need to get the sound I want. Prejudice simply means you have less tools in your tool box.

You find baritones somehow offensive, ok. Don't play them. But to judge the instrument as some how less authentic is exactly what most people do to the uke. It's an irrational assertion based on some odd perception in your head... not reality.

What you have here is your basic cognitive dissonance (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_dissonance). You rationalise the reentrant uke, but for no apparent reason, can't get your head around the same reasoning for the baritone.

It's music... use what you want, ignore the rest. But in my experience, tossing out judgements like this one doesn't help one understand making music any better.

mds725
12-28-2010, 12:16 PM
What you have here is your basic cognitive dissonance (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_dissonance).

Grumpy, reading about cognitive dissonance again like being back in college for me! (I was a social psychology major.) You may be right about the OP feeling some cognitive dissonance. The OP suggested that he wants a baritone ukulele, but it also seems like the OP doesn't want to want a baritone ukulele. Anyway, thanks for the link and the trip down scholastic memory lane!

OldePhart
12-28-2010, 12:18 PM
It's kind of funny. A few weeks ago I probably would have agreed with you. My feeling was firmly, "I already have good guitars, both steel string and nylon, why would I want a small guitar with two strings missing?"

Well, I've begun to figure out some times when a "small guitar with two strings missing" might be kind of handy. I still wouldn't call it a uke (unless tuned reentrant) - but that doesn't mean I couldn't find a use for one if I were to open my front door and find it on my porch one day... (It's amazing how often a big brown truck stops outside my house and leaves something interesting on the porch...)

So, evil? No. It's just not a uke (neither is a tenor tuned low-g in my never-to-be-humble opinion). LOL But an instrument doesn't have to be a uke to be great in its own right.

John

Ukuleleblues
12-28-2010, 12:55 PM
It's kind of funny..... So, evil? No. It's just not a uke (neither is a tenor tuned low-g in my never-to-be-humble opinion). LOL But an instrument doesn't have to be a uke to be great in its own right.

JohnOldePhart, I know they are evil check out the pic!18861

Ukuleleblues
12-28-2010, 12:56 PM
OldePhart, I know they are evil check out the pic!18861That's a baritone being played by the devil!!!

OldePhart
12-28-2010, 01:21 PM
That's a baritone being played by the devil!!!

Heh, heh. Guess he gave up the fiddle, eh?

John

clayton56
12-28-2010, 10:42 PM
I think the bari is more legitimate than concert or tenor. I have sopranos and a bari. The baritone gives me range to low G in re-entrant tuning and lets me use the same picking styles I learned on soprano, and gives a nice alto voice.

I was going to use it instead of guitar as a backup voice, but found the guitar was indispensible in that role.

dans003
12-29-2010, 09:13 AM
i have a bari, and love it. however, it is my best quality uke, so i do have a bit of a bias. i think if i had one just as good that was s, c, or t i would probably like that more.

Plainsong
12-29-2010, 11:28 AM
Oddly enough, the other instrument I've really noticed being subject to this kind of thing is the pennywhistle. There are whistlers who won't play anything that costs more than $15 or who scoff at those who claim they suffer from WhOA (Whistle Obsessive Acquisition Disorder, the whistle-related equivalent of UAS) because they are clearly just being seduced by shiny, expensive whistles that don't work any better than cheap, mass-produced ones. On the other hand, there are whistlers who swear by high-end whistles (please understand that the most expensive whistles out there rarely exceed the price of a mid-range ukulele) and roll their eyes at people who stick by their cheap Clarkes and Generations. There's also a vigorous debate raging over what constitutes a "real" whistle tone.

Personally, I think we should all play what feels and sounds good to us and not obsess over whether or not we are violating the essence of a particular instrument. If I'm afraid I'm going to be slapped down because I like the baritone...or the low-G tenor...or the banjolele...or non-Irish whistle music...or jazz on the accordion...or anything else that isn't considered "pure"...I'm simply going to be playing less music.

That's what I'm saying. Musicians are too busy _playing_ to worry about breaking this or that purist rule. Darn Puritans. :)

tjomball
04-26-2012, 10:26 AM
This to me is an interesting debate.
As a banjo player and guitarist I can to a point see thread starters argument about the "Satan spawned six string guitar banjo". But still that fills a musical "need" if you will.
But I must also agree to a point that part of what makes the uke special to me is the re entrant tuning.
But it still hasn't put me off the thought of a low g tuned concert.
A baritone uke is so far not for me. If that were to be the case I'd rather buy myself a second guitalele and string it up with 1/4 scale guitar strings to get a regular E tuning.

And speaking of instrumental bastards if you will.
What about our beloved little banjo uke? If that's not a bastard child I don't know.
But in all fairness our little "bastards" are there because they fill a musical need. We're not all multi instrumentalist virtuosos. For some of us those bastard instruments gives us an opportunity to get a different sound. And as far as I'm concerned that is a good thing.

But you'll still find me on the balcony sipping my single malt and strumming either my guitar,uke or banjo.. ;)

BlueLatitude
04-26-2012, 11:06 AM
I like the sound of baritones but will probably not get one. But that's only because I have a bit of trouble with the stretches on my tenor.

And even though I have trouble on the tenor, I have it strung with an evil Low-G because it's the closest I can get to a guitar-ish kind of sound.

Where would we be if no one ever hybridized an instrument or invented new ones? Yay for whatever instrument makes a nice sound!

Get the bari! :music:

Ken Middleton
04-26-2012, 11:23 AM
I think "evil" is a bit strong. I am growing to rather like the baritone. However, if I could only ever play just a tenor or a soprano again, it wouldn't worry me unduly.

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
04-26-2012, 01:38 PM
I love ancient threads. Forum archaeology. Fun reading. I love baritone ukes. I am positive that they are good.

kapahulu50
04-26-2012, 02:44 PM
The resurrection of this Satan spawned thread is clearly a sign from the beast to buy a baritone uke.

Ron
04-26-2012, 05:58 PM
I like my Bushman. And yes I played it with the E(?) tuning and thought it sounded like a little guitar. So I tuned it gCEA and preferred the sound (I was just used to it I suppose). THEN we started playing a lot more of those Waylon jennings style country standards in that lazy boomchogachogachoga rhythm (either two/four or 3/four) and I REALLY wanted a decent base note to kick off from so I changed it to a low G. So now it's little guitar tuned up a fourth ;-) but it does exactly what i want it to.

tjomball
04-26-2012, 08:57 PM
The resurrection of this Satan spawned thread is clearly a sign from the beast to buy a baritone uke.

Since 666 is a number that's followed me through my life I say go get yourself a Bari uke..

drbekken
04-26-2012, 09:31 PM
Well...
The baritone ukulele is not a guitar. It is perhaps not a ukulele either, if one is to be picky. But then, why would I care? The main thing is that I like the sound and the feel of the instrument. There are no 'missing' bass strings. The D is the deepest, and it creates a different kind of bass, often with other tones than the root of the chord. This really makes for a special sound, and very interesting chord voicings. Besides, it opens for a lot of ways to play songs in D and G. I was very sceptical towards the baritone at first, but I like it a lot now, and if that means that I'm possessed, then so be it.

ukuleledaveey
04-26-2012, 10:27 PM
I'm with the Doc :) I've only just recently got turned onto the Bari, but wow what a fab instrument, love the sound of it and the challenge of transposing chords and the best thing is E is so easy now on this style of Uke, cant believe people saying "it,s not a ukulele" but yet get defensive when they are told "the uke is not a real instrument" 6 of one and half a dozen of the other, but hey we all human, we all got opinions and we all make mistakes :)
i also love playing soprano as well and as said way back in the beginnings of this thread mmstan "variety is the spice of life" I love my Bari, wish i had got one sooner, but also love soprano's to, they are my prefered sizes. but what ever floats your boat, different horses for different courses, but go grab yourself a bari :)

Skrik
04-26-2012, 10:37 PM
I positively love sopranos, and I enjoy playing my baritone. Tenors (as far as I have experienced) I could live without.

No accounting for taste, as they say.

Nickie
04-26-2012, 10:50 PM
A bari is only evil if I try to play it. I'd feel more comfortable passing gas in public than playing a bari in public.
A tenor banjo, that's another thing.... definitely an instrument of the devil...
Hey, what are you guys doing up at this hour?

Skrik
04-26-2012, 11:55 PM
Hey, what are you guys doing up at this hour?
Living in a different timezone.

ukuhippo
04-27-2012, 12:24 AM
Anyone else think baritone ukuleles are evil?


Yes, see my sig.