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maikii
12-28-2010, 03:28 PM
Does the Kala U-Bass only sound good plugged in, or does it sound good unamplified too?

If yes, that is amazing, with such a short scale!

Since it has a baritone uke body and scale, I am wondering--


Can I get a crummy Rogue baritone uke I have, put the U-Bass strings on it, tune it, and thereby turn it into a bass? Of course not as good as the U-Bass, but will it work?

The U-Bass strings look very thick. Will they even fit through normal bari uke tuners? Do they fit the nut and saddle, and bridge?

What do you think?

Anyone tried this?

Thanks for your input.

Happy New Year!

cb56
12-28-2010, 04:29 PM
The Ubass sounds good unplugged, but it's not very loud at all. Loud enough to practice alone but not loud enough to hang with other instruments. If you think about it, bass notes are BIG notes. You either have to have a BIG instrument to make them loud. Think stand up bass or tuba, or an amplifier to make the small instrument louder.

As far as putting the strings on a baritone goes, they wouldn't fit the holes in the bridge. I would just save up the bux and get the real deal. Maybe look for a used one.

UkeSoCrazy
12-28-2010, 06:37 PM
I also own a Kala U-Bass and I agree completely with cb56. Plugged into my little 20w Hartke practice amp it sounds awesome, I am really impressed with the 4 pz p.ups in the bridge, great response on each of the strings.


http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh190/MachTwang/guitars/ukes/Ubass/DSCF4222.jpg


You would also need to get some of the hipshot tuners for your baritone as the strings are pretty darn big and may not fit on the headstock.


http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh190/MachTwang/guitars/ukes/Ubass/DSCF4224.jpg

maikii
02-02-2011, 05:33 PM
As far as putting the strings on a baritone goes, they wouldn't fit the holes in the bridge.

Yes, I have seen a U-Bass since, and those strings would not fit in a regular bari bridge or tuners.

What about though, if one wanted to experiment a little with regular strings (not the u-bass strings) to turn a bari into a bass? (Granted, not as good as the U-bass, and not something one would gig with, but just to play around with?

Are there any conceivable strings one could use (super hard tension?) that could possibly be tuned to the notes of a bass? (Again, not necessarily good-sounding, and certainly not much volume, but any that one might think could possibly work?

Would it be best for all four to be wound?

If that would be impossible with any strings (other than u-bass, which would not attach to a regular bari), how about bass an octave higher, in other words tuned as the bottom four strings of a guitar (instead of the regular bari tuning, the top 4 strings of a guitar)? I know that will work, as I tried it with the regular Aquila EBGD (1st to 4th) set I put on. (Which feels way too tense at EBGD--the action is pretty bad on the Rogue bari.) So this (octave-higher bass) works with a regular Aquia bari set, but I wonder if it might work better with any other strings? Any suggestion for what might be the best strings for that usage, if the correct-octave bass would be impossible?

Thanks in advance.

rlan
02-02-2011, 06:03 PM
UKESOCRAZY....It looks like you have to many wraps on the A and D tuners. I read that if it gets down to the headstock it can bind and break the tuner. The is some dicussion about this on the UBASS forum and talk bass forum.

bassfiddlesteve
02-03-2011, 02:12 AM
If that would be impossible with any strings (other than u-bass, which would not attach to a regular bari), how about bass an octave higher, in other words tuned as the bottom four strings of a guitar (instead of the regular bari tuning, the top 4 strings of a guitar)?

Professor Peter and Doctor Dick from the Netherlands do just this. They use a "bassolele" which is a baritone uke strung like the bottom four string of a guitar, one octave higher than a standard bass. Since the uke is pitched so high, it actually works pretty well. I know they use the bottom four string of a classical guitar set to achieve this. You can see Doctor Dick playing the bassolele in a couple of these videos (http://www.kleinleed.nl/sis/video.html). The instrument used in the videos is actually a cuatro, but they also use a baritone uke for the same purpose.

- Steve

jop
02-03-2011, 02:31 AM
Yes, it is possible to convert a Rogue baritone into a u-bass. I just did. It can actually be done with very few modifications to bridge, nut and tuners. Once I find out how, I'll post pictures and a small 'tutorial'.

Jens

jop
02-03-2011, 02:57 AM
Here's my attempt at posting pictures and 'tutorial':

The nut is about 42 mm wide. The strings are so fat that it is important that you measure the distance of free space between strings rather than center-to-center-measurements. I have 7 mm between strings which leaves about 2mm outside of the e- and g-strings.

At the bridge I discovered that the groove behind the saddle (where the strings leave the holes they’re tied through) seemed to be in the right position for the bass saddle, so I made a piece of hardwood that fit in there, angled bottom and all. It might be a better idea to rout the groove ‘square bottomed’. This new saddle is wide enough to allow for different compensation for the different strings.
Behind this new saddle I drilled four holes for the strings (down through the bridge and soundboard) –as far back as I dared. Each hole the same size as the string (as close as I could get with metric drills in mm increments).
As I’d rather not make holes in the back of the ‘uke, I had to come up with a way to feed the strings up through these holes. The G-string is easy: I just fed it down through the hole, fished it out through the sound hole, tied a double knot and so on. With the other strings I threaded a thin sewing needle, fed it down the hole, fished it out through the sound hole, stuck it into the end face of the string (I used pliers to make it sit solidly). Then I carefully (with some guidance through the sound hole) pulled the string up through the bridge. It was a bit tricky and took a few attempts for a couple of the strings, but all in all I was amazed how easy it was.
I fitted standard electric bass tuners. The grooves in these were only wide enough for the g-string (and perhaps the d-string), so I drilled the tuner posts to accommodate the wider strings. These strings stretch so much that it would probably be better, easier and cheaper to use really fat old fashioned friction tuners.

I added a simple piezo-buzzer pick-up. It works, but only so-so. I'll have to experiment a bit with where to put it, but I'll probably end up with a commercial under-saddle pick-up. Unplugged it is quiet but fine for practicing.

UkeSoCrazy
02-03-2011, 03:44 AM
UKESOCRAZY....It looks like you have to many wraps on the A and D tuners. I read that if it gets down to the headstock it can bind and break the tuner. The is some dicussion about this on the UBASS forum and talk bass forum.

Thanks rlan, I had taken that picture when I first received the ubass and have since rectified that slightly sloppy setup.

rlan
02-03-2011, 06:36 AM
Good to hear. I figured you knew, but just wanted to make sure. Have a great day.
P.S. I love the little bass. What a fun little instrument.

southcoastukes
02-03-2011, 07:40 AM
We actually have pretty much what Steve is talking about. Tuning is an octave above a standard Bass - still much lower than anything you would find on a ukulele. The only reason we haven't announced it yet is that I wanted to run it through the hands of a couple of our top bass players here in New Orleans for any last minute refinements.

It is also a modification of our Cuatro. The body is a touch bigger than a Baritone. We also have flat wound strings on it which are very nice - smooth as silk! In order to make them work, we had to build in between a Baritone scale and our normal 23" Cuatro Grande scale. Photos here:

http://www.southcoastukes.com/index_files/caraocuatro.htm

Sound is wonderful - we would say more of a Bass "Ukulele" rather than a mini-electric bass.

UkeSoCrazy
02-03-2011, 08:51 AM
Dammit.... Now I want one...

Nickie
02-03-2011, 09:16 AM
That Cuatro looks really nice. I should think that an acoustic bass guitar would suffice, pretty loud unamplified. An Ashbory bass, much cheaper than a U-bass, is a good option too, if you're going to amplify anyway. We're getting one soon. Of course, it doesn't LOOK like a guitar or ukulele.

iDavid
02-03-2011, 11:03 AM
We actually have pretty much what Steve is talking about. Tuning is an octave above a standard Bass - still much lower than anything you would find on a ukulele. The only reason we haven't announced it yet is that I wanted to run it through the hands of a couple of our top bass players here in New Orleans for any last minute refinements.

It is also a modification of our Cuatro. The body is a touch bigger than a Baritone. We also have flat wound strings on it which are very nice - smooth as silk! In order to make them work, we had to build in between a Baritone scale and our normal 23" Cuatro Grande scale. Photos here:

http://www.southcoastukes.com/index_files/caraocuatro.htm

Sound is wonderful - we would say more of a Bass "Ukulele" rather than a mini-electric bass.

Are those for sale?

and how much are those.... so cool.

southcoastukes
02-03-2011, 11:33 AM
Are those for sale?

and how much are those.... so cool.

Should be up on the site in about 3 weeks. Around the same as our Cuatro - $990.00 (binding is extra) though we're looking at a small (hopefully small) price increase.

rlan
02-03-2011, 12:26 PM
Are there any sound clips for the Cuatro ? Looks very nice.

lordlogan
02-03-2011, 12:59 PM
why couldnt i just tune my uke to bass tuning?

southcoastukes
02-03-2011, 01:24 PM
At the moment we only have sound clips for the full scale Cuatro (bottom of the page).

http://www.southcoastukes.com/index_files/cuatro.htm

When we add this short scale version and name it "Bass Ukulele", we'll have a sound clip for that as well. Can't vouch for how good the playing will be, but you'll be able to hear the sound well.


why couldnt i just tune my uke to bass tuning?

As Steve mentioned, it is possible to tune a baritone uke an octave higher than bass tuning with guitar strings. The problem is that on a baritone you would need heavy gauge strings to get decent tension. You're also talking about the four largest round wound guitar strings - the 6th especially is a huge, squeaky monster.

This is why, on ocassion, you build an instrument to fit strings, and not the other way around. These flat wounds are thinner and basically have no squeak. Until or unless we build enough Bass Ukuleles to have the strings made especially for us, we just build an instrument with a scale that gives these strings the proper tension (as well as a big, deep body cavity to match the sound).

maikii
02-03-2011, 05:28 PM
I wonder though--yes, the bottom four strings are good for their specified notes--on a full-size guitar. one would think that with the much shorter scale of the bari uke, they wouldn't sound so good. wouldn't some super high tension bari strings perhaps work better, to tune to the lower notes?


Professor Peter and Doctor Dick from the Netherlands do just this. They use a "bassolele" which is a baritone uke strung like the bottom four string of a guitar, one octave higher than a standard bass. Since the uke is pitched so high, it actually works pretty well. I know they use the bottom four string of a classical guitar set to achieve this. You can see Doctor Dick playing the bassolele in a couple of these videos (http://www.kleinleed.nl/sis/video.html). The instrument used in the videos is actually a cuatro, but they also use a baritone uke for the same purpose.

- Steve

UkeNukem
02-04-2011, 03:52 AM
If I were doing it with guitar strings (octave higher) I'd try Elixir strings. The coating really nulls the squeak (one of my pet peeves anyway).

BTW JOP, that bridge is a fantastic idea! I had thought of using the larger slot but did not want to keep the bridge attached and did not really consider doing the strings that way. I was concerned about intonation. I just can't stand fretted instruments that will not play in tune up the neck. How has that worked on your creation? How far up the neck is it in tune?

I'm also converting a Rogue Bari. I removed the bridge (not an easy task) and sanded the whole thing (except the fingerboard). I will make a wood tail piece that sits on the top half way between the end of the body and the new bridge. This will screw into a backing strip through the top and the have recessed holes for the strings to go into. The bridge will float and have a peizo strip under the saddle but once I get it to the correct spot and angle I'll mark it and drill a hole for the peizo strip wire to go into the body and to the preamp module (UK-2000). I figure that if the hole in the top is a little over sized I can have a little flexibility to move the bridge if need be and the peizo wire will still go through the base of the bridge and the hole in the top (which will still be under the bridge out of sight).

I am using Ashbory tuners and did need to sand down the peg head as it is too thick. The Ashbory tuners are two piece and the part the string wraps around screws onto the post. This means you have to have some room to prevent binding, and modify two tuners for the E & A strings (flip the button part over) because the Ashbory tuners are 4 on a side not 2 X 2. The E & A tuners will also be turning backwards but for the price and low weight I can live with that.

I think I'll finish it by putting on mahogany stain but very dark. Hopefully I can get an even finish with the wood but it is not high quality and I may have to put more layers of stain in some places than others. If it's dark it should hide some of that.

I'm taking pictures as I go but don't have time to keep up a running build thread so I'll post it all when done.

jop
02-04-2011, 05:15 AM
BTW JOP, that bridge is a fantastic idea! I had thought of using the larger slot but did not want to keep the bridge attached and did not really consider doing the strings that way. I was concerned about intonation. I just can't stand fretted instruments that will not play in tune up the neck. How has that worked on your creation? How far up the neck is it in tune?


Thanks UkeNukem. I am still tweaking intonation, but I'm not far off. A quick check showed that I'm almost spot on on 12th fret and within 10 cents all the rest of the way up, -except for the D-string, which is about 20 cents flat at 12th fret. But there seems to be room enough on the saddle to adjust for that (~1/4 inch wide).
By the way, how long is the piezo strip? As it's made for an 'ukulele it might not be long enough for a bass saddle. Also I was wondering whether the tone controls of the UK-2000 were suitable for the bass range.

Jens

UkeNukem
02-04-2011, 07:17 AM
The active part is 65 mm long and 2 mm thick. I laid it in the slot on the bridge (lucky i did not toss it) and it fits perfectly. As far as the preamp it is for Ukulele and has bass and treble (and volume) sliders. The link below shows the control ranges of the UK-2000. The bass is centered at 100 Hz.

http://belcat.com/bbs/data/belcatproduct/1238650652/UK_2000.jpg

There would be other advantages to doing it your method, one being that it does not have to be refinished and using the Road Toad tuners you don't have to sand down the head (and they wind like normal tuners). ;)

Do you use a strap? Is it balanced? I will want to use a strap and the lightness of the Ashbory tuners was a part of choosing them (and cost). I'm also thinking of getting a foam case, too. When you start thinking of ways to make the project nicer you creep closer to the cost of a Ubass anyway. I think Kala really has a winner and their quality/support is second to none. For most folks, getting the real deal is the best way to go and my first recommendation.

If this works well on the Rogue I might try it using a nicer ukulele and use your bridge method. You can shape the top of the saddle for compensation, I did that on a resonator guitar and it plays very well in tune. What I did was shape the saddle either of three ways - |\ /\ /| under each string. At 1/4 inch you deffinately have enough material to work with. Is this what you had in mind?

I think the greatest benefit to mankind of this project is keeping me busy and out of trouble! :rolleyes:

jop
02-04-2011, 10:28 PM
Is it balanced? Until now I had only been playing sitting down, so I just tested it with a strap. It is rather top heavy. No problem if you tie the strap to the peghead, but pronounced if the strap is attached at the heel. It balances somewhere around 14th fret.

I made the saddle excactly as you describe, with a 'ridge' running diagonally along the saddle. Giving the most compensation at the E-string and least at the G-string. For some reason the D-string is the odd man out and requires less compensation.

Jens

maikii
02-05-2011, 03:12 AM
We actually have pretty much what Steve is talking about. Tuning is an octave above a standard Bass - still much lower than anything you would find on a ukulele. The only reason we haven't announced it yet is that I wanted to run it through the hands of a couple of our top bass players here in New Orleans for any last minute refinements.

It is also a modification of our Cuatro. The body is a touch bigger than a Baritone. We also have flat wound strings on it which are very nice - smooth as silk! In order to make them work, we had to build in between a Baritone scale and our normal 23" Cuatro Grande scale. Photos here:

http://www.southcoastukes.com/index_files/caraocuatro.htm

Sound is wonderful - we would say more of a Bass "Ukulele" rather than a mini-electric bass.

What kind of strings do you use for that? Do you make a set for it? Would they work (tuned the same) on a bari uke?

If not, what strings would you recommend, to tune a bari uke like that, bass octave up?

UkeNukem
02-05-2011, 03:14 AM
Thanks for the test, JOP, I'll have to see how mine balances when complete. It may be much more body heavy as the Ashbory tuners are very light and it will have the pickup module in the lower bout (I did the cutout yesterday). I can always add the heel and end strap pins last. This project seems to be focusing my widely divergent musical skills that began with the clarinet (ACK) then drums/percussion, then guitar, then a little keyboards, and bass along the way.

I have been listening to The Grateful Dead again lately and how Phil Lesh plays. His style was summed up on a bass forum as "Never play the root and never on the beat". While an exaggeration, it sure sounds that way much of the time and something in his playing really "clicks" in me. Probably just a phase.

I already created what my friend calls a Gbass (Ga-bass) which I took an extra electric guitar, removed the frets, played it that way for about a year, then put heavy flatwounds for the bottom three strings and round wounds for the top three and tuned it A-A the bottom string being tuned the same as the A string on bass (220). Now THAT'S a phase!

As far as the bridge/saddle thing, I was just going to angle the bridge since it will float but, if you notice the picture of the Ubass bridge there are four saddles, at least that is how it appears. I may try to do that depending on what do-dad wood I find at the thrift store. I bet is is to separate the string vibration to the peizo but who knows if the Ubass has a strip or four separate peizos. Not that it matters in my case I already have the unit and it is a single strip, but I think it may help the clarity of the pickup. I guess the only way to tell would be to do it both ways (NOT!).

maikii
02-05-2011, 03:20 AM
If I were doing it with guitar strings (octave higher) I'd try Elixir strings. The coating really nulls the squeak (one of my pet peeves anyway).

The brand name doesn't tell me what gauge of strings to use, to best tune a baritone uke to the lowest four guitar string notes. (Someone wrote the lowest four guitar strings, but they would be way too floppy tuned to the same notes on a bari uke scale.)

Also, does Elixir make nylon strings? I wouldn't put steel strings on a uke.

southcoastukes
02-05-2011, 03:33 AM
What kind of strings do you use for that? Do you make a set for it? Would they work (tuned the same) on a bari uke?

If not, what strings would you recommend, to tune a bari uke like that, bass octave up?

The flat wounds would be too loose on a standard baritone. That's why we're building the longer scale.

For your use, UkuNukeEm's suggestion of Elixirs is a possibility. They still won't be nearly as slick as the flat wounds, but better than anything else.

Be very careful with tension. These are acoustic strings, not classical. Can't really guide you as to where to start, but you'll need to have a light tension, as the core won't be as flexible as on a classical string.

You'll have some adjustments for intonation, but not nearly what you would have to do for a conversion to the heavier strings.

maikii
02-05-2011, 05:12 AM
In suggesting Elixir though, you are suggesting strings for a full size guitar. You write that the strings for your uke bass would be too loose on a bari uke, as it has a longer scale. Well, strings for a full size guitar would be still much looser! Light tension would make them stll looser! So i'm not sure what you are suggesting!

As I wrote before, just suggesting a brand name does not tell me much. More important to start out with, what gauges would be good for those notes, on a baritone scale? After that is figured out, then one could consider which brands might be better.

Does Elixir make nylon strings, by the way? Probably not a good idea to put steel-core strings on a uke.


The flat wounds would be too loose on a standard baritone. That's why we're building the longer scale.

For your use, UkuNukeEm's suggestion of Elixirs is a possibility. They still won't be nearly as slick as the flat wounds, but better than anything else.

Be very careful with tension. These are acoustic strings, not classical. Can't really guide you as to where to start, but you'll need to have a light tension, as the core won't be as flexible as on a classical string.

You'll have some adjustments for intonation, but not nearly what you would have to do for a conversion to the heavier strings.

maikii
02-05-2011, 05:16 AM
What about the lowest four strings from a children's smaller guitar set? Are those sets any good? Would they be decent for an octave-bass?

Which size would be closest to a bari scale? 1/2 size? 3/4 size?

You have a point though, that for a bass, good to have all four wound strings. No set like that though, suitable for a bari uke scale. so one would have to buy individual wound strings. I would have no idea what gauges to use for that purpose? Anyone know?

Or--a set of extra heavy Worth bari strings? (But then all unwound.)

southcoastukes
02-05-2011, 11:03 AM
maikii -

A couple of things. First you have to use wound strings. Anything out of treble material would be dead as a doornail.

Second, knowing guages does you no good at all. Too many people fall into that trap. Would you use Nylgut gauges to order a set of flourocarbons? No, they would be way too thick. Flourocarbons have a greater density, so are thinner for the same use as nylgut.

With wound strings this is also true. Everyone's formulations are different, and so gauges for any given use will vary from one material to the next.

What we have been suggesting is that if you want to deal with these big wound strings, strings 3-6 from a guitar will get you there (not in that order, of course). By the way, should have added that you'll get much better balance with a set that offers a wound guitar 3rd.

Try the golden polished strings from from LaBella - you can get them at StringsbyMail. Don't say I didn't warn you - even polished, those are still big squeaky monsters.

UkeNukem
02-05-2011, 12:11 PM
I guess I was not paying attention to the details of your build. I thought it was heading the direction of wound metal strings. Elixir does make acoustic guitar strings and I have used them. You might take a look at their site for some gauges of the various sets.

http://www.elixirstrings.com/

http://www.juststrings.com/elixirguitarsinglestrings.html

The Nanoweb is the thin coating.

southcoastukes
02-05-2011, 12:31 PM
Hello Nukem,

Yes, those Elixirs are fine strings. We have a "silent partner" in our little group. His name is Jimmy Foster. Practically invented 7-string archtops - an incredible builder and player as well. He plays the Elixirs and recommends them to all his clients. I tried out some Nanowebs at his place - very nice!

I think the confusion is over the fact that we are using flat wound strings. That makes them sound like they are for an acoustic guitar. These particular strings, however, are made from a softer compund, the tension is on the light side, and in fact are intended for classicals.

I just wanted to make maiiki aware that if he tried acoustic strings on his baritone, especially the big sizes, he could very well enter the land of flying bridges.

jpgordon
02-05-2011, 12:47 PM
According to the Aquila site, they're coming out with their own strings for the U-Bass. Anyone heard anything about this?

maikii
02-05-2011, 09:35 PM
Thanks for all the replies, but I am not sure if I am getting my question across.

As I wrote earlier, I think before one decides on which brand of strings to buy, a first step would be to determine what gauges I should use of individual strings, or what kind of set.

If the bari uke had the same scale as a full-size guitar, then putting on it strings 3-6 of a guitar, to play the same tones as a guitar, would work. However, that is not the case. The bari uke scale is much shorter. So using the same strings for the same notes, they will be floppy.

As I wrote, I already tuned that way, using the Aquila regular bari set already on the uke. They are much too floppy, when tuned so low. But I do not know that those strings from a regular guitar set would be any better.

Extra hard tension bari uke strings? Extra hard tension classical guitar strings? 1/2 size guitar strings?

What do you think?

UkeNukem
02-06-2011, 04:53 AM
I see what you mean, maikii. That is a "physics" problem basically. One thing I've found is the heavier the gauge (or fatter the string) the lower they can be tuned and still have enough tension. The opposite is that fat strings cannot be tuned higher without making the tension too high. That's why strings get progressively thinner as you tune higher. We all know that as stringed instrument players but the way it works for bass may not be apparent.

This all also means there are trade-offs in changing string gauge. Things like nut height/slot width, neck releif, and saddle height all have to balance to make the instrument playable with a given set of strings.

Good luck in your experiments!

maikii
02-06-2011, 05:21 AM
Thanks, Nukem.

Yes, I totally understand the physics.

Yes, there will be some experimenting.

However, I hoped that some here could give me some good suggestions for starting to experiment. For instance--at a baritone scale, what kind of string set or individual strings might work best, to tune to the suggested notes? Can anyone help with that? Thanks.


I see what you mean, maikii. That is a "physics" problem basically. One thing I've found is the heavier the gauge (or fatter the string) the lower they can be tuned and still have enough tension. The opposite is that fat strings cannot be tuned higher without making the tension too high. That's why strings get progressively thinner as you tune higher. We all know that as stringed instrument players but the way it works for bass may not be apparent.

This all also means there are trade-offs in changing string gauge. Things like nut height/slot width, neck releif, and saddle height all have to balance to make the instrument playable with a given set of strings.

Good luck in your experiments!

thebigiamPete
05-10-2013, 04:13 AM
Here's my attempt at posting pictures and 'tutorial':

The nut is about 42 mm wide. The strings are so fat that it is important that you measure the distance of free space between strings rather than center-to-center-measurements. I have 7 mm between strings which leaves about 2mm outside of the e- and g-strings.

[B].

Hello there:-) Now this might sound rather silly to you but I know nothing about these things. This seems a great sollution to people like me who are skint. I have a kala baritone (the cheap one) that i fancy having a go with. Did you replace the nut or modify the gaps? why did you not increase the gap in the bridge where the saddle normaly fitted? Sorry to ask but I am clueless:-) Pete

jop
05-10-2013, 12:35 PM
Hello there:-) Now this might sound rather silly to you but I know nothing about these things. This seems a great sollution to people like me who are skint. I have a kala baritone (the cheap one) that i fancy having a go with. Did you replace the nut or modify the gaps? why did you not increase the gap in the bridge where the saddle normaly fitted? Sorry to ask but I am clueless:-) Pete

No problem, ask all you want. I used the existing nut. The grooves for the bass strings are so wide that they 'swallow up' the existing grooves, so you can easily fiddle around with the spacing. As there was a groove in the right position in the bridge (the bass strings need more compensation than the baritone strings), it was very straightforward to fashion a saddle to fit in there, rather than butchering at the bridge.

thebigiamPete
05-31-2013, 11:49 AM
No problem, ask all you want. I used the existing nut. The grooves for the bass strings are so wide that they 'swallow up' the existing grooves, so you can easily fiddle around with the spacing. As there was a groove in the right position in the bridge (the bass strings need more compensation than the baritone strings), it was very straightforward to fashion a saddle to fit in there, rather than butchering at the bridge.cool thanks for that

Mrbell321
02-25-2014, 01:32 PM
Jop, I'm doing a conversion now and your tuners look really similar to mine, but you seem to have managed to drill them without destroying them. When I put the string next to the neck, they are practically the same size. How did you manage that?

jop
02-25-2014, 09:17 PM
Mrbell.
I simply used a drill press, using drills the same size as the strings. It didn't work out perfectly with the E- string. The hole size is - as you also noticed- very close to the size of the post, so there isn' much material left, and it tends to bend. The strings get much thinner when stretched, so you could get away with much smaller holes, if only you could find a way to feed the strings through them initially. I saw a different - and probably better/easier - way, but I've forgotten where: he simply stretched the strings next to the posts, and tied them on with thin nylon strip/zip thingies through the holes. This could probably be done with the original tuners, but they will probably take a lot of winding because they are so thin.

Jens

Mrbell321
02-27-2014, 12:19 PM
Thanks for the response. But... I decided to track down some other tuners that will just work better.