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ukejoelele
12-30-2010, 04:43 PM
Hi, Sorry if similar things have been asked before, but what is the best way to record a pono MT being played onto a PC? I preferably would like to avoid drillling into my ukulele but if its safe and neccessary... is there any less intrusive pick ups? If not what mics/software is best? Thanks, Joe

Doc_J
12-30-2010, 04:49 PM
A decent mic will suffice. The Blue snow ball seem popular in the good but low/moderate cost range. There are many good mics, it just depends on your budget. The audio on some digital cameras can be good enough.

OldePhart
12-30-2010, 05:06 PM
Just about any large diaphram condensor mic works great for recording acoustic stringed instruments (guitar, uke, etc.) for studio work. For YouTube, what Doc_j said about the built in mic in some video cameras - even my Flip HD has very good audio.

John

bazmaz
12-31-2010, 12:57 AM
I use a Shure instrument Mic, through a small mixer (with phantom power on the microphone stage) and into my PC through an M-Audio Audiophile sound card.

It all depends what quality you are after - you can get away with a USB microphone straight into the PC. At the other end of the scale you could spend hundreds on a mic, hundreds on a mixer, and hundreds on a sound card.

Tor
12-31-2010, 01:26 AM
I did a quick test with a zoom H4 recorder which I use for a little bit of acoustic guitar recording. Test worked out well. Zoom makes several similar recorders, 2- and 4-track or more, and with or without video. The mic/recording quality is very good for the price. There are also other vendors in the price range. The options these days are incredible when you look at price/performance and built-in features like multitrack recording and editing, effects (e.g. reverb) etc.. Combine that with Audacity or something on a PC (my H4 came with Cubase included) and you can do anything and everything.

Pippin
12-31-2010, 01:38 AM
I prefer using a mixing board, a stand-alone multi-track studio recorder, and some really high-quality studio condenser mics. If I were restricted to recording straight on the PC, I would probably opt for the above mentioned snowball mic. For the money, it is not bad. I would opt for MixCraft as my software of choice... not a freebee like Audacity because nothing is really free... they are collecting data on you in exchange for using the program. You are also limited in what you can do moreso than using a purchased app like MixCraft. My recommended app can also use VST plugins, like the "Master Limiter" which will increase your volume a lot when you need it.

Tor
12-31-2010, 02:48 AM
I don't know what data would be collected with Audacity.. admittedly I use it on Linux not Windows, but I don't see what could be collected. The application is part of the software distro I use, and I'm not connected to the 'net with my laptop when I use it either.
I also use Ardour btw. There's no Windows version as far as I know, but there is a Mac version.
Disclaimer: I'm not a pro in any sense with any of this software.
(Also remember that some of the home-recording equipment you buy come with a license for pay-software like Cubase, which works ok for many.)

Richie23
12-31-2010, 03:38 AM
An inexpensive way is to get a stick on pickup. I use a Schaller Oyster pickup version 723 http://guitar-pickups.biz/hp135250/Artikel-Liste.htm which costs about 25. It comes with a non-staining re-usable putty substance to attach to the wood of your uke. I then attach the jack to an inexpensive 'Jack to USB' lead which is connected to my Mac or PC. I use the freeware programme Audacity to record. The whole setup costs around 40. I also just discovered the free amp modelling software called Slego, which you can download here http://www.dontcrack.com/freeware/downloads.php/id/5483/software/Slego/ or here http://www.overloud.com/download.php.

Ukuleleblues
12-31-2010, 01:39 PM
I use a Zoom H2 and have used a Roland Edirol. Just download the wav to the pc and edit it. I have been very satisfied with the results. Plus it's super portable. I'll also conect my H2 straight to the mixer and record through the line in when we perform. Sounds great.

I think they have a new ZoomH1 recorder for $99. Has anyone tried it?

thejumpingflea
12-31-2010, 01:54 PM
Just about any large diaphram condensor mic works great for recording acoustic stringed instruments (guitar, uke, etc.) for studio work. For YouTube, what Doc_j said about the built in mic in some video cameras - even my Flip HD has very good audio.

John

Small condensors are typically better for acoustic stringed instruments. Large is more suited for vocals.

That being said, I use both a large and small for a stereo recording. They are both great. ;)

Nuprin
12-31-2010, 02:43 PM
Small condensors are typically better for acoustic stringed instruments. Large is more suited for vocals.

That being said, I use both a large and small for a stereo recording. They are both great. ;)

I do the same...pencil condenser about 6" out pointing to where the fretboard meets the body, and a large diaphragm pointing to the body around 12" out.

pdxuke
12-31-2010, 03:39 PM
Mac user: I used to use the M-audio firewire interface (410) until it TOASTED THE FIREWIRE on MY BRAND NEW MAC DESKTOP (grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr...) So, I'm now searching for another alternative. I have some fabulous xlr mics, but no way to get them into garageband. I am thinking of trying a usb mic, but I hear that the latency issues make it all but impossible to multi track. Amybody have ideas? Allan?

Richie23
01-01-2011, 02:45 AM
Mac user: I used to use the M-audio firewire interface (410) until it TOASTED THE FIREWIRE on MY BRAND NEW MAC DESKTOP (grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr...) So, I'm now searching for another alternative. I have some fabulous xlr mics, but no way to get them into garageband. I am thinking of trying a usb mic, but I hear that the latency issues make it all but impossible to multi track. Amybody have ideas? Allan?

Just a simple USB to Jack lead, then a Jack to XLR adapter. This will cost very little, and your Mac will recognize the setup. I use this set up with garageband myself, and its works really well. Not had any latency issues on a very old Mac-Mini.

pdxuke
01-01-2011, 09:57 AM
Just a simple USB to Jack lead, then a Jack to XLR adapter. This will cost very little, and your Mac will recognize the setup. I use this set up with garageband myself, and its works really well. Not had any latency issues on a very old Mac-Mini.

Which adapter do you use? Shure? Icicle by Blue?

ukeeku
01-01-2011, 12:03 PM
I love, and I mean love my Blue Yeti
$81 on amazon
http://www.amazon.com/Blue-Microphones-Yeti-USB-Microphone/dp/B002VA464S/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1293922916&sr=1-1
and here are all my sound samples that I have done with it so far
http://ukeeku.com/sound-samples/

My only word of caution is to treat the USB jack with a lot of care, they will fix it but it can breat easily.

Richie23
01-01-2011, 01:43 PM
Which adapter do you use? Shure? Icicle by Blue?

I use neither, as I put my own together from bits I bought at Maplins, but have looked at the Blue Microphones Icicle XLR To USB Converter, which looks to be a real treat of a device. Don't know about the Shure one, probably much the same. I used to have a lovely Shure 444 Mic, which i used for Radio Broadcasting... back in the old days.

ukejoelele
01-02-2011, 06:48 AM
Thanks for the posts, think I will look into the blue mic, looks quite good value for the quality. Joe

Ukulele Jim
01-02-2011, 10:28 AM
I've recorded two entire albums using a Zoom H4. Works well for me!