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mr_dust
07-08-2008, 10:10 AM
What's up fellow strummers!
Does anyone know the story behind how the ukulele got an high G string? (if there are such a story:rolleyes:)
Becuase it would make more sense to put a low G string on when you are "creating" the instrument, at least according to me. With that said i'm not against the high G, it's quite the opposite! =P

tad
07-08-2008, 01:25 PM
What's up fellow strummers!
Does anyone know the story behind how the ukulele got an high G string? (if there are such a story:rolleyes:)
Becuase it would make more sense to put a low G string on when you are "creating" the instrument, at least according to me. With that said i'm not against the high G, it's quite the opposite! =P

Why would it make more sense to have a low G?

Are you saying reentrant tuning is less intuitive, or are you saying that it's easier from a luthier point of view-- something about pressure on the bridge or something?

If it's the former, this guy seems to think it's a matter of the instrument's pedigree (http://www.coolhanduke.com/history.html)--


In a Madeiran ensemble, the raj„o performs much the same function as the rhythm guitar. It has five strings, tuned DGCEA. The D is re-entrant, tuned in unison with the D on the C string; the G string is re-entrant (like today's soprano uke), tuned in unison with the G on the E string. The ukulele is tuned like the raj„o, but without the D string.

If it's the latter-- I can't help you. I'm not much with woodworking.

Howlin Hobbit
07-08-2008, 04:35 PM
Why would it make more sense to have a low G?. . .this guy seems to think it's a matter of the instrument's pedigree (http://www.coolhanduke.com/history.html)--


In a Madeiran ensemble, the rajão performs much the same function as the rhythm guitar. It has five strings, tuned DGCEA. The D is re-entrant, tuned in unison with the D on the C string; the G string is re-entrant (like today's soprano uke), tuned in unison with the G on the E string. The ukulele is tuned like the rajão, but without the D string.

You can trust Mr. Scanlan (Scanlon???)... ahem, you can trust Dan on this matter.

Also, you have to bear in mind that re-entrant tuned instruments were around long before the "low" tuned types. Prior to the technology of extruded wire and therefore the possibility of wound strings it was almost impossible to make a short scale instrument string that played a low note. Longer scaled instruments (like double-bass, though I think that was a later development too) were possible because having a really thick piece of gut on them worked ok.

mr_dust
07-08-2008, 10:31 PM
Why would it make more sense to have a low G?

Are you saying reentrant tuning is less intuitive, or are you saying that it's easier from a luthier point of view-- something about pressure on the bridge or something?

If it's the former, this guy seems to think it's a matter of the instrument's pedigree (http://www.coolhanduke.com/history.html)--


In a Madeiran ensemble, the raj„o performs much the same function as the rhythm guitar. It has five strings, tuned DGCEA. The D is re-entrant, tuned in unison with the D on the C string; the G string is re-entrant (like today's soprano uke), tuned in unison with the G on the E string. The ukulele is tuned like the raj„o, but without the D string.

If it's the latter-- I can't help you. I'm not much with woodworking.

Hey I'm not saying that reentrant tuning is less intuitive, I was just curious in why the ukulele had a "high G" tuning becuase when i briefly thought of other string instuments they all had low strings(there are probably a term for that) like guitars and so one. And my history/theory isn't the best so I hope I didn't offend you or anything :o And as I said I was just curious in the history behind it's tuning :)

But thanks for your comments! Now I know better :p

tad
07-08-2008, 10:46 PM
I'm glad you asked. I hadn't thought to look into the history of the tuning.

(Bad historian, bad!)

mr_dust
07-09-2008, 05:37 AM
No prob ^^

deach
07-09-2008, 05:39 AM
I'm glad you asked. I hadn't thought to look into the history of the tuning.

(Bad historian, bad!)


lol at the irony.