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DustinCasler
01-07-2011, 06:52 AM
Hey

I've had my uke for two weeks today and absolutely love the instrument. I've been having tons of fun working on strumming and making different chords. The few that I seem to keep having severe issues getting right are g a g7. Has anyone else had this issue and have any recommendations for getting them right. Also if it helps, I own a concert size. I've played a few tenors and seem to have less trouble with those. Thanks for any help or suggestions.

Mandarb
01-07-2011, 07:04 AM
Nothing specific - just patience and practice. Some people find tenors easier because there is a little more room to fret chords.

JamieFromOntario
01-07-2011, 07:13 AM
The way James Hill taught to make a G chord is to:

Make a peace sign with your left hand.
Use those to fingers to play the 2nd fret of the 1st (A) and 3rd (C) strings.
Then stretch your ring finger to its spot on the 3rd fret, 2nd string (E).

I personally find the G7 a much easier chord to make. I often play it as part of the following progression:
C, C7, F, G7, C
The real trick here is to keep the pointer finger (used for the 1st fret, 2nd string) held down as you change from F to G7.

but like Mandarb says, just give it time and practice; it will come.

Huckleberry
01-07-2011, 07:34 AM
My two cents for what it's worth. I play some songs where I play the G chord then follow it with he G7 fairly quickly. My solution is to form the G7 chord with middle finger on C string second fret, ring finger on A string second fret, and index finger on E string first fret. Holding that pattern, I then put my little finger on the E string third fret which gives me the G Chord. To go from G to G7 I simply raise my little finger. Works for me.

DustinCasler
01-07-2011, 07:41 AM
Thanks for all the tips so far everyone. I even tried using my pinkie to form the g chord, which didn't go so well, ha.

fitncrafty
01-07-2011, 07:43 AM
Dustin the only thing I can add to the already good advice is something I was taught - is to strum each string individually so you can figure out where you are not fretting correctly.
I am not sure if you are having issues with the shapes or clean sound.. but this technique seems to really help as you know which finger you need to adjust to get a good sound.
Keep on practicing it will come.(and maybe I will take my own advice when it comes to E)

swervy jervy
01-07-2011, 07:45 AM
The G chord is the secret shame of beginning ukers. You must form it one thousand times, grasshopper.

molokinirum
01-07-2011, 09:14 AM
You can also use your index finger and bar the C E & A stings at the second fret and then place your middle finger on the E string third fret. This might help if space is a bit tight.

OldePhart
01-07-2011, 04:36 PM
My two cents for what it's worth. I play some songs where I play the G chord then follow it with he G7 fairly quickly. My solution is to form the G7 chord with middle finger on C string second fret, ring finger on A string second fret, and index finger on E string first fret. Holding that pattern, I then put my little finger on the E string third fret which gives me the G Chord. To go from G to G7 I simply raise my little finger. Works for me.

+1 on this - it also really helps where you're playing a blues shuffle (G, G6, G7, G6). With your middle and ring fingers holding the C and A strings at the second fret, you start with your pinky down on the E string, 3rd fret, then lift it, then put down the index finger on the first fret, then lift it. Real easy shuffle.

Sometimes, though, it pays to know your barre G. The barre G is formed by barring all four strings at the second fret, then you use your middle finger at the third fret of the E string and your ring finger at the fourth fret of the G string. The latter is actually optional in many cases - if you don't put the ring finger down you're playing a Gadd9, a slightly bluesier version of the chord that can be used most places a G is called for.

The reason this barre form is often important is it puts you in position to play several of the chords in G that are otherwise a bit tricky to get to quickly (Bm, and Em). So, you kind of choose which G form to use based on what chords are around it.

John

cletus
01-07-2011, 04:45 PM
Sometimes, though, it pays to know your barre G. The barre G is formed by barring all four strings at the second fret, then you use your middle finger at the third fret of the E string and your ring finger at the fourth fret of the G string. The latter is actually optional in many cases - if you don't put the ring finger down you're playing a Gadd9, a slightly bluesier version of the chord that can be used most places a G is called for.

The reason this barre form is often important is it puts you in position to play several of the chords in G that are otherwise a bit tricky to get to quickly (Bm, and Em). So, you kind of choose which G form to use based on what chords are around it.

Yup, good stuff, thanks!

Eavorclear
01-07-2011, 05:50 PM
In my opinion, the Barre G is the best G to play, it may be tricky at first, but it definitely helps in the long run.

OldePhart
01-07-2011, 06:00 PM
In my opinion, the Barre G is the best G to play, it may be tricky at first, but it definitely helps in the long run.

It has the advantage of being a movable chord, that's for sure. I use the barre probably more often than the open, but there are a few things for which the open is nice. Still, when playing in G I usually play the barre and also barre the C, that way all of the chords except the Am are closed and it's easy to change keys if I need to. I love the way you can play the I, iii, IV, V, & vi all around that barre and only need to move it up 1 fret for the IV. Since I've been playing bass the past couple of years I'm all about boxes. LOL

John

DustinCasler
01-08-2011, 07:38 AM
Tried the barring idea. Helps a bit. Thanks for all the ideas.

Hudman
01-08-2011, 09:38 AM
Muscle memory is the key. You can only get it by practicing over and over and over again. Your fret hand coordination, endurance and strength will increase as you continue to practice.

It's going to take some time. Remain patient and keep working at it.

DustinCasler
01-08-2011, 10:13 AM
I've been practicing making the chords while watching TV, hope I get it soon. It's making me wish I would have gone tenor instead of concert though. ha. And to think, I was originally going to get a soprano.....