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View Full Version : A string changing hint...



OldePhart
01-15-2011, 06:18 AM
Saw another thread about several folks either having just changed strings for the first time or getting ready to. Thought I'd mention something that makes that particular chore a lot easier if you have a tie-on bridge.

Make friends with a nurse / doctor, or go to a gun / knife show, or find a head shop if you live in an area where such have not been closed down. Buy a hemostat or two. Now when you need to push that slippery little bit of string through a tiny loop and pull it through you have tiny little grasping fingers that will do the job quite neatly.

Besides, now you have a perfectly legitimate legal reason to have a hemostat on a chain around your neck. LOL

John

pdxuke
01-15-2011, 06:27 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mU42wHlS-NY

I learned with this You Tube Vid. It is really clear and concise.

OldePhart
01-15-2011, 06:30 AM
Hmm, even better - but now I don't have a legitimate reason to wear that hemostat! LOL

John

cletus
01-15-2011, 06:32 AM
Hmm, even better - but now I don't have a legitimate reason to wear that hemostat! LOL

John

What's legitimate anymore? <sigh>

Tudorp
01-15-2011, 07:19 AM
Great tip. I been using hemostats for years as 3rd hands for loads of things. You can buy them in places that sell hobby tools, and soldering tools too. I have curved pairs, straight and several configurations, and use them for countless things, and yes, even stringing guitars, and ukes. No home or tool box should be without a set of those things..

Ingrate
01-15-2011, 10:51 AM
Agreed about the hemostats! Once you've used them, you wonder how you did w/o them.

I disagree w/Sauer's technique for winding/securing the string at the tuner. Here are images I found on the 'net that show a secure way which I use, and minimal string is needed on the tuner post (a good thing).

OldePhart
01-15-2011, 11:26 AM
That does look like a handy and secure little wrap. I have to confess that I didn't watch the whole video so I don't know what he recommends for the tuner end. I've just been using the "one over, two or three under" technique I learned with guitars years ago and it seems to work fine. I can see where your way would be better if the string was a bit on the short side - but I don't expect to have that problem now that I'm cutting my strings from 25 yard rolls!

John

pdxuke
01-15-2011, 11:57 AM
Agreed about the hemostats! Once you've used them, you wonder how you did w/o them.

I disagree w/Sauer's technique for winding/securing the string at the tuner. Here are images I found on the 'net that show a secure way which I use, and minimal string is needed on the tuner post (a good thing).

Never had a problem w/Sauer's method. I'd be interested to know why you prefer what you posted?

rem50
01-15-2011, 12:04 PM
I visited Kent Knorr at the NC ukulele academy and asked him to show me. While we talked he changed them for me! :)

Ingrate
01-16-2011, 06:03 AM
Never had a problem w/Sauer's method. I'd be interested to know why you prefer what you posted?

1. It's logical. It's a double-lock knot. It doesn't rely on friction between the string and the winding post.
2. It minimizes the amount of string wound on the post.
3. It's very easy.
4. So far, it has not failed.

pdxuke
01-16-2011, 08:07 AM
1. It's logical. It's a double-lock knot. It doesn't rely on friction between the string and the winding post.
2. It minimizes the amount of string wound on the post.
3. It's very easy.
4. So far, it has not failed.

Thanks. Makes sense. I'll try it!

eor
01-16-2011, 08:29 AM
Besides, now you have a perfectly legitimate legal reason to have a hemostat on a chain around your neck. LOL

John

they are sold at fishing outfitters... we use them for getting a hook out of a fishes mouth cleanly.... but thats All....no really thats all... what was i talking about????

oh well time for a lunch.....