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Paul December
02-05-2011, 01:00 PM
I recently heard "Early One Morning" which not only is a pretty song, is very easy to play (in this form at least) (http://chordie.com/chord.pere/www.guitaretab.com/m/misc-traditional/12523.html?=&1944-06-06=always&transpose=&tuning=GCEA)

Can anyone suggest some other titles I should check out? Ken Middleton has some fantastic tabs, but I'm more interested in simpler, strum/sing songs.

If there are any collections out there, that would be great as well.
If the chords are common ones, even a collection written for another instrument would be cool.

This song gets referred to as "Early Folk" and sometimes as "Renaissance"

For those unfamiliar with the song, here it is played on the guitar:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jlm86TkV4GE

gnomethang
02-05-2011, 02:01 PM
NOBODY is to mention 'The Sick and Bucket Dance'....nor 'The Hedgehog Can Never Bbe Buggered At All.
So long as this is clear.

Gillian
02-05-2011, 02:09 PM
How about "In An English Country Garden"?

I learned it in the key of C, but here it is in the key of G.

http://bettylou.zzruss.com/englishcountrygarden.htm


"Greensleeves" is also an easy traditional song, written by Henry the VIII, I think. Too bad it was co-opted into a Christmas carol...

Paul December
02-05-2011, 02:17 PM
How about "In An English Country Garden"?

I learned it in the key of C, but here it is in the key of G.

http://bettylou.zzruss.com/englishcountrygarden.htm



:) That's a perfect one, thanks!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eN12TIJbnmM

Paul December
02-05-2011, 02:35 PM
I just found this one:

I Gave My Love A Cherry

C F C
I gave my love a cherry that had no stone
G7 C G7
I gave my love a chicken that had no bone
Dm C G7
I gave my love a ring that had no end
F Am F G7 C
I gave my love a baby with no cry-ing

F C
How can there be a cherry without any stone
G7 C G7
How can there be a chicken that has no bone
Dm C G7
How can there be a ring that has no end
F Am F G7 C
How can there be a baby with no cry-ing

F C
A cherry when it's blooming it has no stone
G7 C G7
A chicken when it's pipping it has no bone
Dm C G7
A ring when it's rolling it has no end
F Am F G7 C
A baby when it's sleeping has no cry-ing

F Am F G7 C
I gave my love a baby with no cry-ing

ksiegel
02-05-2011, 04:55 PM
NOBODY is to mention 'The Sick and Bucket Dance'....nor 'The Hedgehog Can Never Bbe Buggered At All.
So long as this is clear.

How about "The Wizard's Staff Has A Knob At The End"? (which happens to have been written by the same wonderful writer as "The Hedgehog Can Never be Buggered At All", Esther Freisner.)

-Kurt




(And yes, I know Terry Pratchett wrote OF the songs, but Esther actually wrote lyrics to the songs in the late 90's, and someone I can't recall wrote the music. They have been recorded but I can't recall by who.)

Kem
02-05-2011, 09:29 PM
Well, if you don't mind wandering all over the British Isles instead of sticking strictly to England, try "The Ash Grove," "Wild Mountain Thyme," "The Gypsy Rover," "My Love is Like a Red, Red Rose," "Loch Lomond," "Whistle and I'll Come to You, My Lad," "Barbara Allen," and "Skye Boat Song." Some are more recent compositions than others, but they all have that British folky feel to them.

gnomethang
02-06-2011, 12:32 AM
How about "The Wizard's Staff Has A Knob At The End"? (which happens to have been written by the same wonderful writer as "The Hedgehog Can Never be Buggered At All", Esther Freisner.)

-Kurt
(And yes, I know Terry Pratchett wrote OF the songs, but Esther actually wrote lyrics to the songs in the late 90's, and someone I can't recall wrote the music. They have been recorded but I can't recall by who.)

I remember that! I think after the first mention of the Hedgehog Song Pratchett paid tribute "To everyone who srote in with their own verses....Deary, deary me!"

Occasional ends of choruses:
"...with a snail if you slow to a crawl,
but the hedgehog....."
"...with a giraffe if you stand on a stool,
but the hedgehog....."

Y'all get the picture!

bazmaz
02-06-2011, 01:34 AM
I like to play Leaving Of Liverpool (which may actually be Irish!), and Scarborough Fair.

How about The Lark In The Morning, Toss The Feathers, The Cuckoos Nest?

Paul December
02-06-2011, 07:42 AM
:) Thanks guys, I'm seeking them out right now.

ksiegel
02-06-2011, 05:22 PM
In all seriousness, if you want Early English Songs, you need to do some research on the Child Ballads.

The last I knew, the Child Collection was more than 5 volumes, and contained thousands of versions of early English songs, many of which exist today in modified form.

If you do a Google search on "Child Ballads", you can hit the Wikipedia article, which explains things.

Another source is the Max Hunter Folk Song Collection, at Missouri State University: http://maxhunter.missouristate.edu/childballads.aspx

This is a subset of the Child Ballads; the intro paragraph says: The English and Scottish Popular Ballads compiled and edited by Francis J. Child and published in the last decade of the nineteenth century, is a standard reference for British ballads. Here are listed the versions of these so-called "Child Ballads" found in Max Hunter's collection of Ozark folk song.

There are at least 7 versions of "The Gypsy Davey" (aka "The Gyspy Rover") in this collection. Many have basic musical notation, some have audio files. It appears to be up to us to write the chords/tabs.


Good Luck!


-Kurt

Kem
02-06-2011, 10:21 PM
"The Gypsy Davey" / "The Gypsy Rover" / "The Raggle-Taggle Gypsy" / etc. is a project in and of itself. The story told by each ballad is similar, but the melodies and words are very different. You could have a perfectly good concert consisting of nothing but versions of this song.

BobN
02-07-2011, 03:36 AM
There is a good resource on 16th century ballads here:
http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ballads/

Some mp3s of singing here:
http://www.yorkshirefolksong.net/song_database/all/1.aspx

I am working on "All In A Garden Green"
http://www.csufresno.edu/folklore/Olson/SONGTXT2.HTM#ALLGARDN

Leodhas
02-07-2011, 05:50 AM
I like a lot of the traditional songs/music from the north west of england, specifically those from lancashire. Acts like 5 penny piece and the Houghton weavers. They sing songs in the lancashire dialect (very funny) mainly about working in the old cotton mills and drinking too much. Very under-rated traditional english folk music but great fun and easy to figure out on the uke.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZfS97WcRwI

byjimini
02-07-2011, 07:37 AM
Calico Printer's Clerk is a good 'un, only three chords. :)

bazmaz
02-07-2011, 12:21 PM
Leodhas - as a Lancashire Cricket Club Member, if this was Facebook I would click the LIKE button on your post!!!

Have you heard the band Chonkinfeckle?

itsme
02-07-2011, 09:06 PM
If Ireland's not too far off your radar, how about "Whiskey in the Jar"? It's a traditional song that's been done by such bands as Thin Lizzy, Metallica and the Grateful Dead.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whiskey_in_the_Jar

Leodhas
02-08-2011, 12:18 AM
Leodhas - as a Lancashire Cricket Club Member, if this was Facebook I would click the LIKE button on your post!!!

Have you heard the band Chonkinfeckle?



Not heard of them but will give them a listen, will you tube them.

The only reason I got into Lancashire folk music (so heavily influenced by Victorian Industry) is due to having part of my schooling in that part of the world. When I was a kid my father moved the family South of the border down to Salford (for work) and we ended up staying 5/6 years, I moved back home when I was 18 and my sister stayed down there as she married a sassenach.

Five penny piece or 'The Piece' were the band we first started listening to and then others of that ilk.

However due to my own family being musically based in the Celtic tradition I was made aware of Ewan MacColl (Kristy's father) due to him having Scottish roots, although born and bred in Salford, and his song writing (which when deconstructed is heavily in the Celtic Style, you just have to Listen to 'Dirty Old Town' which many mistake to be written about Glasgow or Dublin but of course is Written about Salford).

Ewan MacColl is taken that wee bit more seriously by me. I understand that he was the guru of English folk music from the late 40's through to the 60's writing tunes like the 'Lancashire Rambler' but even songs like 'The first time ever I saw your face' which was famously covered by Roberta Flack although I prefer MacColls more traditional folk version. Sorry about the MacColl ramble, I'm just a wee bit of a fan of his.

My pals down there keep telling me about a new Band called the 'Lancashire Hotpots' have you heard of them?