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View Full Version : Garageband - Recording two separate things at once.



CoLmes
02-06-2011, 01:33 PM
Does anyone know how this would work? I'm just trying to put my uke which I am plugging right into my inpit on the side of my computer, and I have a USB snowball for vocals. Is there really a way to record both simultaneously ?

Raygf
02-06-2011, 02:54 PM
Never tried it, but here is an explanation.
Regards,
Ray

http://www.thegaragedoor.com/back/multitrack.html

Lori
02-06-2011, 03:06 PM
There is always a bit of a problem recording vocals with a mic, at the same time as a plugged-in guitar or uke. Even if you could record the mic input at the same time as the uke input, some acoustic spill from the uke will get into your vocal track. I guess that is only a problem if you start editing the tracks separately. You could plug into a room amp, and record both live with the mic.

–Lori

ceviche
03-24-2011, 09:13 PM
Lori,

You might try a uni-directional mic--one that only picks up sound coming from right in front and not from the sides. Another approach to uke bleed-over into the vocal mic would be to record a second track of you playing only uke. That way you can blend "up" the second track to merge with your first uke playing while not overwhelming your vocals.

I once did that with a jam session I taped with a 4-track recorder. The mic we recorded with was a uni-directional and only picked up the mandolin player. I later filled back in my own guitar to mask over my barely audible original take.

--Dave E.

Ukulele JJ
03-25-2011, 03:37 AM
There is always a bit of a problem recording vocals with a mic, at the same time as a plugged-in guitar or uke. Even if you could record the mic input at the same time as the uke input, some acoustic spill from the uke will get into your vocal track.

Only if the singer were in the same room as the uke-player, as would be the case with live gig, or in the studio if the singer was also the uker.

In a traditional studio setting, however, the vocals are typically recorded in an acoustically-isolated vocal booth, so there's little or no bleed-over. For a home studio where the singer was not the uker, you could just have the singer in another room. You'd need long enough cables for the mic and the headphones. (Oh, and you'd need a headphone splitter of some kind, I guess...)

Otherwise, I'd just do them in two passes with the same mic. (The uke will probably sound better miked anyway.)

JJ

pdxuke
03-25-2011, 07:00 AM
What I think you are asking for is a USB mixer that permits several mic -ins. You need something like this, a USB mixer or multi-mic box:http://www.amazon.com/M-Audio-Fast-Track-Ultra-Interface/dp/B003Y55VMK/ref=sr_1_44?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1301072333&sr=1-44

I have reservations about anything Maudio, but you might start here with your research.

Maybe this as well:
http://www.amazon.com/PEAVEY-CH-USB-MIXING-BOARD/dp/B002CWO10E/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1301072491&sr=1-1

SweetWaterBlue
03-25-2011, 07:15 AM
As others have said, you need a mixer. I sometimes mix signals inside the Zoom H4, because it has a mixer in it and plugs into my USB port. You don't have to have a USB mixer, since I used to use an old analog mixer that plugged into my microphone input on the computer - very old school.

Guitar Center has a good deal on the Tascam D-004 for the next few days ($129 with a $20 rebate, plus the sale). It comes with a couple of pretty good mics, plus a 4 channel mixer.

I usually just use Audacity as a mixer, but when I do I record the tracks separately and then mix in my computer. Its a little harder if you don't have a good mixer, because you can't necessarily monitor the tracks that you just recorded.

spots
03-25-2011, 07:30 AM
The OP was able to resolve this a while ago, but as a follow up on the bleed over discussion.

For two track recordings I use two cardioid mics and work with mic placement. The backside of cardioid mics have the most sound rejection. So I point the backsides (as much as possible) towards the sound source I want to reject. Usually I end up with some version of a mic lower than my mouth pointing up at the ceiling, and one above the uke pointing at the floor.

There may still be some bleed of vocal and instrument into the mics (including reflection from the ceiling and walls), but the bleed over is greatly reduced compared to having both mics pointing at your body.

Since I am not trying to do professional grade studio records, the small amount of bleed hasn't caused problems for my uses. I use compression on the voice track, EQ the instrument track, etc. and the recordings still sounds good.

Supercardioid or hypercardioid mics might be more directional, but they also start to pickup sound from the backside of the mic. This may introduce other problems into recordings depending on your setup.