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View Full Version : On Aquila Nylgut string



berylbite
02-14-2011, 02:20 PM
does any set of Aquila Nylguts work for any ukulele? or are there different sets for different sizes?

Can I tune it up with a low G if I re-arrange the gauges accordingly or do I have have to buy a specific set.

Steve vanPelt
02-14-2011, 02:28 PM
For low G you have to buy a low G set. The low G will be a wound string.

Tantal
02-14-2011, 02:40 PM
I think the main difference is the length. You can use Tenor strings on a Soprano, but you might be too short the other way around when you string it up.

berylbite
02-14-2011, 03:06 PM
Thanks guys!

maikii
02-14-2011, 03:14 PM
I think the main difference is the length. You can use Tenor strings on a Soprano, but you might be too short the other way around when you string it up.

No, not true. They are different gauges, for different instruments.

Look at http://www.aquilacorde.com/en/modern-instrument-sets/ukulele.html

You can see all the sets they make for the different ukes, and different tunings.

If you scroll down to the bottom of the page you can see the gauge and/or weight of each string in each set.

berylbite
02-17-2011, 10:06 AM
aw snap, I guess I'll have to plop the concert strings I ordered on my bushman, no biggie.

PhilUSAFRet
02-19-2011, 03:58 PM
Be very careful of very "bright" ukes, especially sopranos. Aquilas will make any uke "brighter" I think. Worth clears and browns are becoming increasingly popular for folks who want a mellower sound and the soprano folks are discovering Martin Fluorocarbon strings because they are thinner and give your fingers a little more room.

Plainsong
02-19-2011, 05:36 PM
Worths make my Howlett soprano sound plonky. I still say a good uke will sound good even with the wrong string match, and you can hear through the plonkiness that the uke itself isn't plonky, but it came with aquilas and I think that's the match.

I used to think that koa=aquila and mahogany=Worth, but there are so many exceptions. I waiver between aquila and worth. D'darrios aren't for me.

Deek
02-20-2011, 05:07 AM
I've used aquila's for years and I recently ordered some Martin Fluorocarbons to try out in the soprano/concert gauge. I've been trying to fix a buzz on a koa tenor I just built and I decided to re-string the tenor with the soprano/concert Martins. They were plenty long enough. Although the buzz is still there (something internal, I've concluded), the new Martin fluoros have given it a really sparkly tone. The A-string almost sounds like a steel string which really adds definition to melody notes. I'll have to try it for a while, but for now I think it was a sucessful experiment.

joeybug
02-20-2011, 05:09 AM
Worths make my Howlett soprano sound plonky. I still say a good uke will sound good even with the wrong string match, and you can hear through the plonkiness that the uke itself isn't plonky, but it came with aquilas and I think that's the match.

I used to think that koa=aquila and mahogany=Worth, but there are so many exceptions. I waiver between aquila and worth. D'darrios aren't for me.

I've used Aquila on every Uke EXCEPT my KPK which I though could do with a different sound, I have Worth Brown's on her now and she does sound a lot mellower and I do like it :D

Plainsong
02-20-2011, 05:43 AM
Yeah, normally I like Worths too. Just for that one specifically, I think it's Aquila. Just in case your UAS is flaring up for one of his ukes. ;)

joeybug
02-20-2011, 06:00 AM
Yeah, normally I like Worths too. Just for that one specifically, I think it's Aquila. Just in case your UAS is flaring up for one of his ukes. ;)

It is slightly! Argh! I need more money!!!

mds725
02-20-2011, 04:31 PM
The other day I met someone with the same ukulele I have, a Big Island Honu koa tenor. My ukulele is strung with re-entrant Aquilas and his was strung with low G Worth Browns. Even accepting uke-to-uke differences in soung among ukes of the same model, there was a big difference in sound -- his ukulele sounded a lot mellower with much better low range sound, while mine sounded bright with a dominant treble range sound.