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View Full Version : Modifying Inside of Grizzly Uke body



PhilUSAFRet
02-26-2011, 10:13 AM
Another grizzly question. I am building a Grizzly kit primarily as a first effort at uke building and am replacing the top with a solid spruce one, along with several other upgrades. Since I will have the top off, I will have access to the inside. I remember a few posts somewhere and have the following questions:

1. From YouTube, the Dolphin uke with the plastic body sounds better than it's all laminate counterpart to me. Therefore, would I gain any benefit from applying a sealer/finish to the inside of the laminate body and back?

2. Should I install braces and or kerfing before putting the top on?

3. Any caveats about getting creative with soundhole(s)?

I just want this little guy to "all it can be."

Doug W
02-26-2011, 05:07 PM
1. ...the Dolphin uke with the plastic body sounds better than it's all laminate counterpart to me. Therefore, would I gain any benefit from applying a sealer/finish to the inside of the laminate body and back?

Keep in mind that I have built 1 Grizzly kit and that is it for my experience as an instrument maker. I was in a music store once looking at a guitar that had been built by a relatively new builder. The guitar was finished on the inside. I commented on how nice it looked and the repair guy at the music store said he believed it would not allow the wood to "breathe" naturally-moisture might be sealed in between the layers of finish.

His theory sounded good to me, but what do I know?

Bradford
02-26-2011, 05:25 PM
Some luthiers finish the insides of their instruments, most don't, I doubt it would improve the sound.
If you don't install any braces or kerfing before you put the top on, you will have a hell of a time doing afterwards!
As long as the area of the soundhole(s) are fairly close to that of the original, you can get as creative as you wish.

Brad

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
02-27-2011, 05:39 AM
Keep in mind that I have built 1 Grizzly kit and that is it for my experience as an instrument maker. I was in a music store once looking at a guitar that had been built by a relatively new builder. The guitar was finished on the inside. I commented on how nice it looked and the repair guy at the music store said he believed it would not allow the wood to "breathe" naturally-moisture might be sealed in between the layers of finish.

His theory sounded good to me, but what do I know?

The wood is dead. It's not breathing. If anything it'll keep moisture out and would likely slow down the effects of changes in humidity. Many builders I know here will spray a coat inside the sound box if for no other reason than to give dust less to stick to. Some feel it brightens the tone.

Allen
02-27-2011, 09:06 AM
Linings and braces need to go on before you close the box up. Sound holes can be anything you want within reason. Try and keep the total area of the sound holes you are going to use similar to the standard one. And sealing the inside of the box is a good idea. You don't see factory ones do it because it adds another step and costs money. I use shellac on the inside. What it does is buffer humidity swings. Slowing down the up take or drying out of the instrument. Pretty important thing to do when you live in a place like Australia that can have conditions from hot and steamy to bone dry all within a few hours drive, or even the same location, just depending on which way the wind blows.

PhilUSAFRet
02-27-2011, 01:45 PM
Thanks for some great info. I live on the Central FL East coast.