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ichadwick
07-18-2008, 10:02 AM
http://i9.ebayimg.com/05/i/000/eb/cd/a9eb_1.JPG
Link:
Tiple from South America (http://cgi.ebay.ca/Tiple-ukulele-guitar-Lonestar-solid-cedar-top-NIB_W0QQitemZ350052038589QQihZ022QQcategoryZ16224Q QrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD1VQQcmdZViewItemQQ_trksidZp163 8Q2em118Q2el1247) with 12 strings.
I though the tiple had 10 strings? Or are these somewhat different instruments with the same name?

Kekani
07-18-2008, 10:32 AM
Tiple (tee-play) has origins, depends on who you talk to, in Columbia (and other South American countries). What you see is real.

Martin adapted and dropped two strings (when they brought it here), and of course, in the American tradition, changed the pronunciation to Tiple (tip-po).

Guess its a good thing `ukulele is still pronounced `ukulele, and not youkulele.

SinisterDom
07-18-2008, 10:56 AM
Guess its a good thing `ukulele is still pronounced `ukulele, and not youkulele.


Bah, tons of people pronounce it You-Koo-Lay-Lee here and it kills me, I just wanna hit 'em.

uke142464
07-18-2008, 11:59 AM
Bah, tons of people pronounce it You-Koo-Lay-Lee here and it kills me, I just wanna hit 'em.

yea same, ever since I started calling it an ookoolaylay, whenever someone says youkilaylee i cringe:mad:

Tomdini
07-18-2008, 05:42 PM
Occasionally, when somebody calls it a "youkilaylee," after I've repeatedly used "ookoolaylay" in our conversation... depending on the furrow of their brow, a gleam of deliberate ignorance in their eye... I'll wait 'til they're walking out of a Dairy Queen with a delicious Reese's Peanut Butter Cup Blizzard in their hands, or perhaps after standing in line at the post office for an hour and a half just to mail a letter with delivery confirmation... and then I'll run 'em down with my '67 GTO.

Ain't nothin' like it, folks. Ain't nothin' like it.

Anyway, these fits of indignant rage are partly why I'm so far from my native Lithuania to this day.

-Tom

SnakeOiler
07-18-2008, 08:34 PM
So do you guys call France, "Fraan-say" or Chili, "Chill-ay"? The way they are pronounced by natives of those countries? How about Germany, do you call it "Dueschland"? Different languages and dialects use different pronuciations. It doesn't make it wrong or bad. My whole life I've said "youkilaillee" to change it and to correct others would be pretentious.

Kekani
07-18-2008, 09:42 PM
to change it and to correct others would be pretentious.

I didn't see anything about correcting anyone. Did I miss something? Okay, Tom may have come close, but still he doesn't correct anyone. He just uses his GTO as Mad Max would've should that Blizzard have been a can of gas.

The topic of correct pronunciation of this instrument that we know and love was beaten to death on another forum, and ran a sad 50% or so. When I saw the first 3 responses, I fell on the floor. I was absolutely shocked that correct pronunciation on an "international" bulletin board existed. Great for us here at UU!

To answer your question - yes. When I was in Germany speaking to locals, Deutschland was the term, I ordered Pommes Frites in France, and Due Birra in Italy. Aloha is my departing message on my voice mail at work, and Mahalo is part of daily conversation.

Even when I disrespect the `ukulele so much that I shorten its name, pronunciation is the same, its an `uke (ook).

Bottom line, you can feel comfortable here pronouncing `ukulele correctly. Nobody's going to hold it against you.

deach
07-18-2008, 10:17 PM
So do you guys call France, "Fraan-say" or Chili, "Chill-ay"? The way they are pronounced by natives of those countries? How about Germany, do you call it "Dueschland"? Different languages and dialects use different pronuciations. It doesn't make it wrong or bad. My whole life I've said "youkilaillee" to change it and to correct others would be pretentious.


Reminds me of "A Christmas Story" -

'frah-gee-lay.' It must be Italian...

http://www.redriderleglamps.com/images/products/leg_lamp_50_in_deluxe/Deluxe-Crate-small.jpg

ichadwick
07-19-2008, 03:40 AM
Guess its a good thing `ukulele is still pronounced `ukulele, and not youkulele.

Better than "yuk-a-laylee" which I've heard.

Me, I don't care how it's pronounced as long as it's respected.

tad
07-19-2008, 05:05 AM
Bottom line, you can feel comfortable here pronouncing `ukulele correctly. Nobody's going to hold it against you.

But apparently, some forum members WILL hold it against you if you use the standard American or British English pronunciation.

Does this mean you guys will think less of me if I don't roll my R's when I order a burrito at Taco Bell?

Does it matter that burritos are primarily norteamericano food?

Jimmy
07-19-2008, 05:51 AM
Bah, tons of people pronounce it You-Koo-Lay-Lee here and it kills me, I just wanna hit 'em.

Eek.

The thing is, it's the accepted way of saying it here. But it's very hard for me to say 'ukulele because I can't say it nicely. I always sound like a gorilla.

redsedge
07-19-2008, 07:18 AM
Yep, it'd be pretty pretentious to say oo-koo-lele here in the UK (oo-kay?) when we've all called it you-kulele for ever. Does it really matter?

Kekani
07-19-2008, 08:07 AM
when we've all called it you-kulele for ever. Does it really matter?

I just had a thought - oh, oh, this may get dangerous. . .
I think its general consensus that there are still many people that don't respect the youkulele (much less youkalaylee) as a musical instrument, especially outside of Hawai`i. I'll take a stab that most of them don't know what an `ukulele is, or have really heard what an `ukulele can do in the hands of someone who appreciates it.

I don't think its about disrespect, because I truly don't think that people mispronounce it intentionally, except for those that know how to pronouce it.

Sorry for hijacking the thread (not), but for more examples - when I go to a Korean BBQ, and want to order BBQ Beef, I usually order Bulgogi, especially when the owner is taking my order. This, for me, is born out or respect for their culture. Now, just because I don't do it all the time to all cultures, doesn't mean I disrespect them - no, it means I'm ignorant about them and have yet to learn.

I'll take anyone saying `ukulele and sounding like a gorilla anyday (and twice on Sunday) way before I'll hear youkalaylee.

BTW - Tiples are cool, my nephew and 11-year old loves the sound, and the fact that they can actually chord and pick the instrument and make this wonderful 3-dimensional sound. Go to Cumpiano' s website for a soundbite of a Columbian Tiple (teeplay), or just listen to Sunday Manoa and Peter Moon (tippo).

Kaneohe til the end
07-19-2008, 08:10 AM
So do you guys call France, "Fraan-say" or Chili, "Chill-ay"? The way they are pronounced by natives of those countries? How about Germany, do you call it "Dueschland"? Different languages and dialects use different pronuciations. It doesn't make it wrong or bad. My whole life I've said "youkilaillee" to change it and to correct others would be pretentious.

but "Fraan-say" or "Chill-ay" are said like that because of accents. saying youkilaillee is ignorant, its not like you cant say it correctly.

Ukulele Dude
07-19-2008, 09:22 AM
but "Fraan-say" or "Chill-ay" are said like that because of accents. saying youkilaillee is ignorant, its not like you cant say it correctly.

When I say 'youkalaylee', I realize that people in Hawaii don't pronounce it that way. But that's not where I live. And where I live people don't pronounce it that way. And I don't either, even though I know people in Hawaii do.

SnakeOiler
07-19-2008, 10:28 AM
but "Fraan-say" or "Chill-ay" are said like that because of accents. saying youkilaillee is ignorant, its not like you cant say it correctly.

Actually, you have that backwords, we say "Frans" because of our
accent and the way we pronounce certain written words. The same with Ukulele.



But................



"It don't matter how you say it.......Just as long as you play it" :music::rock::music::rock:

SamIAm
07-19-2008, 05:21 PM
perhaps after standing in line at the post office for an hour and a half just to mail a letter with delivery confirmation... and then I'll run 'em down with my '67 GTO.

Ain't nothin' like it, folks. Ain't nothin' like it.

Anyway, these fits of indignant rage are partly why I'm so far from my native Lithuania to this day.

-Tom[/QUOTE]

If i ever had to be hit by a car getting hit by a '67 GTO is my idea of dieing in style! I wouldnt want to marr the car though...i guess i should wrap myself in bubble wrap huh....(there is my nonsense rant for the day)

Rubbertoe
07-19-2008, 06:58 PM
I think it's very interesting the way this thread changed subjects. I'm thinking that cultural pride plays a role in how adamantly one person vs. another argues the "correct" pronounciation of our favourite little instrument. I guess it's the same way I feel when a Filipino, born and raised in the Philippines, corrects me on how to pronounce my last name (I'm a Canadian-born Filipino and have always pronounced my last name with a non-Filipino accent). I don't think I'm disrespecting my culture when I pronounce my name the same way I've been pronouncing it since the age of 3 (or whenever I learned my last name).
As for the "correct" pronounciation of ukulele... I lean towards the historically correct pronounciation. I'm curious though: so far the two schools of thought are arguing between ook-oo-lay-lay and yoo-koo-lay-lay but when Aldrine says "ukulele", doesn't he pronounce it ook-oo-luh-luh (I may have misheard him though since I'm usually too focused on what's coming from his Kamaka).

Kaneohe til the end
07-19-2008, 09:33 PM
Actually, you have that backwords, we say "Frans" because of our
accent and the way we pronounce certain written words. The same with Ukulele.
that was me quoting the other dude, but its different if you CANT say it because of an accent.


When I say 'youkalaylee', I realize that people in Hawaii don't pronounce it that way. But that's not where I live. And where I live people don't pronounce it that way. And I don't either, even though I know people in Hawaii do.
does that in turn mean that if everyone where you live were chopping their fingers off, you would too? i understand what you are saying, however that only means all of you are saying it incorrectly. considering the ukulele was birthed in hawaii, i think we have the correct pronounciation. 'ukulele means jumping flea, youkalaylee does not mean anything, nor is it a word in any language, dead or alive. i understand where you are coming from, having to conform to everybody else, not wanting to be the one who is different. just because everybody smokes pot doesnt make it ok.

deach
07-20-2008, 01:03 AM
Wow! Who'd think pronouncing ukulele one way or another is as serious as chopping fingers off?

Just wondering, do all the people who cringe when they hear "you-kulele", cringe when they hear MeXico? and do they go around correcting people telling them the proper pronunciation is "Meh-hee-co"?


just because everybody smokes pot doesnt make it ok.
What if you have glaucoma?

ichadwick
07-20-2008, 03:12 AM
but "Fraan-say" or "Chill-ay" are said like that because of accents. saying youkilaillee is ignorant, its not like you cant say it correctly.

Ah - what about vanilla? No accents there - do you pronounce it properly - van -ee-ya? Or van-ill-ah? Is that ignorant? Or just custom?

Or what about Mexico - Me- hee -ko? Mont-ree-al or Mon-ree-al? Qwebec or Kay-bec? Jerusalem or Yer-oo-shal-eye-im?

Do you order a "grand-ay" coffee at Starbucks or a "grand"? Is it ignorant to deliberately mispronounce a pretentious word?

I suspect we all pronounce what we're accustomed to in our own area. I think we all understand the meaning even when the pronunciation isn't exact or accurate. When I was growing up it was Peiking and Bombay. Now it's Beijing and Mumbay. When I forget and say Peiking, everyone knows where I mean, although a few will correct me.

I call it "you-koo-lay-lee" around here because people are not familiar with "oo-koo-leh-leh" and look at me strangely. If the discussion gets further, I tell them the proper pronunciation, but so what? They're not going to use it and more than they'll start spelling doughnut or drive-through correctly.

As far as I know, I'm the only uke (ook?) player in this town of 18,000. If I can't get anyone else interested in playing, what are my chances of getting them interested in pronouncing it properly?

Rubbertoe
07-20-2008, 06:37 AM
In the end, it really shouldn't matter so much how you say it; it's how you play it!