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View Full Version : Opinion on Cutaway Ukuleles?



The Pohster
03-02-2011, 06:21 AM
What is the general opinion? Minor advantages and minor setbacks?
Does it take away from the look?.
Thanks,
:spam:

cletus
03-02-2011, 06:43 AM
I don't like the way they look, a definite deal killer along with any dreaded abalone trim.<shudder>

Nixon
03-02-2011, 07:38 AM
I was never a fan of traditonal cutaways, but I did fall for a "benjamin scoop" style so much I commissioned a uke with one.

http://petehowlettukulele.co.uk/pete_howlett_ukulele_march_blog.html

Its abut halfway down the page.

Kanaka916
03-02-2011, 07:49 AM
I have an 8 string cutaway and IMO, it's basically eye candy. Some like 'em and some don't. Besides, it was my first uke after not playing for, let's just say awhile.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v486/hawhyen51/IMG_2991.jpg

casarole45
03-02-2011, 07:51 AM
Like any uke it depends on the individual one. Most cutaways I hate, but this one which I own by Ohana looks the bees knees, and loses something when it doesn't have the cutaway... The flamming on the one I got is insane (these are just stock photo's).

2116321164

What I'm really waiting for though is for someone to go wild and get the first ever custom Gibson SG shape acoustic uke. Reckon that would look wild and be pretty individual in the uke world...

janeray1940
03-02-2011, 07:52 AM
I don't like the way they look, a definite deal killer along with any dreaded abalone trim.<shudder>

With you all the way on both of these points.

ItsMrPitchy
03-02-2011, 07:54 AM
I like the look of cutaway ukes and it makes lower frets easier to reach which is a bonus. But its all opinion based so each to their own.

hoosierhiver
03-02-2011, 08:00 AM
The extra few frets can be useful if you are a great player, but I think most people buy them for the look.

fabioponta
03-02-2011, 08:14 AM
A love for the ukulele has risen in recent years, and that love reaches beyond the ears and the eyes especially. Generally, models with more traditional designs that look more "vintage", are the most preferred. It's almost like something from a new kind of cult culture: in most countries (especially in third world's most populous), the ukulele is still unknown and creates some degree of differentiation of access to culture.
Some brands avoid to make ukulele models with cutaway body, as is the case of Koaloha, even though a solution to feedback problems with pickups. The solution for them was the tenor for the manufacture of the "Thinline" tenor model, thinner, with less feedback and no cutaway. Other models with cutaway generally has fewer problems with pickups (Ohana, Mainland, Mele), who plays acoustic guitar with pickup knows the story of the feedback.

More than the sound, the ukulele is an aesthetic style.

At least that's what I think as an anthropologist ukulele player....

casarole45
03-02-2011, 08:24 AM
The extra few frets can be useful if you are a great player, but I think most people buy them for the look.

I bought mine for the extra fret access (I'm not saying I'm a great player though :) ), but on the concert sizes it can be a dog if you want to hold a chord shape up in the cloud section of the uke. My Mainland does however look pretty just the way it is =D

itsme
03-02-2011, 08:32 AM
I don't like the way they look, a definite deal killer along with any dreaded abalone trim.<shudder>


With you all the way on both of these points.
Wow, the three of us should start a club. :p

Mandarb
03-02-2011, 08:45 AM
I am with the consensus so far - not a fan of cutaways. But if you like one with a cutaway - go for it.

PhilUSAFRet
03-02-2011, 08:52 AM
I love all ukes, including cutaways. I even plan on putting a pickguard on my "blues" uke, just for the aesthetics. To paraphraze Andrew Zimmern on Bizarre Foods, "if it looks good an sounds good to you, play it."

GX9901
03-02-2011, 09:23 AM
I think a cutaway helps with upper frets access if the neck is joined at the 12th fret, but since most ukes I have are joined at the 14th fret, it hasn't been something I've needed. I do think on some ukes they work very well in terms of looks:

This Maccafferi guitar look-alike practically required a cutaway:
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/_hMJKe0Vprf4/SPu1iWYLX4I/AAAAAAAAARg/AAoCRQM0rMQ/s512/DSC_7479.jpg

Many solid body ukes look better with a cutaway IMHO:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_hMJKe0Vprf4/S5qN4Hgw-wI/AAAAAAAABAc/wDFw1pLqUGM/s512/DSC02761.JPG

joeybug
03-02-2011, 09:51 AM
Wouldn't normally go for a cutaway and my first four Ukes are "traditional" shape, but my next Uke is a cutaway, not buying it for the look more for what it has and can do! Came highly recommended to me :D

mm stan
03-02-2011, 11:26 AM
I personally like the traditional look....wasted time making them and additional cost....

SailingUke
03-02-2011, 11:32 AM
I personally like the traditional look....wasted time making them and additional cost....

I like the traditional look as well. With a cutaway you not only pay more but you are getting less ukulele. :)
Of couse, I do have "the James Hill Wedgie" on my DaSilva.

PhilUSAFRet
03-02-2011, 11:48 AM
Awwwww, I want a Macccaferi uke!

JamieFromOntario
03-02-2011, 12:00 PM
I like the "James Hill Wedgie" too!

BoatPaddle's M-style cutaway looks nice too.

cb56
03-02-2011, 12:13 PM
I have one cutaway and two non cutaway. Love 'em all!

pulelehua
03-02-2011, 12:31 PM
Heresy. (damn, short of 10 characters)

Heresy. A lot.

Tred
03-02-2011, 12:35 PM
Whilst not a lover of cutaway ukes in general there is one with a true florintine cutaway which, if I can find one, will be my next purchase. I believe it's a Bushman tenor and, by it's looks, is modeled on the Gibson guitar florintine cutaway - sounds good too. I think it looks better on a uke than on a guitar!



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTIv8hP-UIA

ichadwick
03-02-2011, 01:14 PM
Cutaways were designed for guitars so it was easier to play the frets above the 12th. They're more aesthetic than necessary on a uke. Me, I like the way they look - they can be very modern in appearance. They also reduce the body cavity somewhat, so may modestly affect volume and tone.

As for abalone - most of what gets passed off as abalone is really plastic or even paper in resin. I don't mind it, as long as it's subtle.

cletus
03-02-2011, 02:27 PM
As for abalone - most of what gets passed off as abalone is really plastic or even paper in resin. I don't mind it, as long as it's subtle.

Subtle abalone?:stop: That stuff is the cilantro of ornamentation!:biglaugh:

itsme
03-02-2011, 02:37 PM
Subtle abalone?:stop: That stuff is the cilantro of ornamentation!:biglaugh:
They say it's due to a certain gene, but a lot of people (including me) think cilantro tastes like soap and can't stand it.

SailQwest
03-02-2011, 02:38 PM
My primary concern with a ukulele is the sound, with looks being not terribly important. That said, my husband and I both play cutaways as our "main" ukes, but they were specially picked out of a large shipment based on their beautiful sound. The cutaway was neither a deal-maker nor a deal-breaker for either of us.

Of course, after playing a cutaway for several years I've really gotten used to easy access to those higher frets.

70sSanO
03-02-2011, 03:11 PM
I have a traditional tenor and a very non-traditional tenor cutaway.

I like the access to the higher frets when I occassionally go up there.

People either love or hate the looks...

http://photos.imageevent.com/70ssano/ukulelestuff/icons/IMG_0848.JPG

John

philpot
03-02-2011, 04:04 PM
I don't mind them, but I far prefer a traditional body. Just my opinion.

The Pohster
03-02-2011, 05:22 PM
I was looking at the Honu Delux XXX uke concert or tenor cutaway size...hmm