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aaabha
03-10-2011, 06:08 AM
Just had a thought... which led me to realize just how deep the depths of my ignorance is... http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/images/smilies/wink.png

Couple of Qs about baritone ukuleles...

a) I know the tuning is different. I'd assume this means how you play chords is different, too, yes?
Is there somewhere that has these listed? Or are they, in fact, the same finger placements?

b) a friend, guitar player, wants a bass AND a ukulele. Just for silliness sake, could, should he wish, a baritone uke be tuned like a bass (an octave or two up, of course)? Or is it tuned like that already?

c) If the chords ARE, in fact, different, can a baritone ukulele be tuned to GCEA? I mean, I assume it CAN be done, but is there a reason it isn't?

d) Because of the longer (and I assume thicker) strings, would using a pickup and using distortion sound more like a guitar? Would making a solid body, with steel strings and, say, a humbucker, sound more like a guitar? (I ask, as ANOTHER friend, who also plays guitar, was cracking up at the idea of doing a ukulele rock band, with all the loudness that entails and thought the idea of, in his words, "a teeny version of my Les Paul" was hilarious... and charming, but he's thinking that, after a little research, having someone on baritone might fill the sound out better, if EVERYONE's playing ukuleles.)

God... I really am ignorant about this stuff...

Well, I guess that's what we're all here for, no? To bring the light of the mystical, magical ukulele to those that are still in the dark!
Me? I'm still kinda poking me head out of the cave.http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/images/smilies/biggrin.png

Thanks all, for any help...

.

Lori
03-10-2011, 07:04 AM
Just had a thought... which led me to realize just how deep the depths of my ignorance is... http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/images/smilies/wink.png

Couple of Qs about baritone ukuleles...

a) I know the tuning is different. I'd assume this means how you play chords is different, too, yes?
Is there somewhere that has these listed? Or are they, in fact, the same finger placements?

b) a friend, guitar player, wants a bass AND a ukulele. Just for silliness sake, could, should he wish, a baritone uke be tuned like a bass (an octave or two up, of course)? Or is it tuned like that already?

c) If the chords ARE, in fact, different, can a baritone ukulele be tuned to GCEA? I mean, I assume it CAN be done, but is there a reason it isn't?

d) Because of the longer (and I assume thicker) strings, would using a pickup and using distortion sound more like a guitar? Would making a solid body, with steel strings and, say, a humbucker, sound more like a guitar? (I ask, as ANOTHER friend, who also plays guitar, was cracking up at the idea of doing a ukulele rock band, with all the loudness that entails and thought the idea of, in his words, "a teeny version of my Les Paul" was hilarious... and charming, but he's thinking that, after a little research, having someone on baritone might fill the sound out better, if EVERYONE's playing ukuleles.)

God... I really am ignorant about this stuff...

Well, I guess that's what we're all here for, no? To bring the light of the mystical, magical ukulele to those that are still in the dark!
Me? I'm still kinda poking me head out of the cave.http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/images/smilies/biggrin.png

Thanks all, for any help...

.

Welcome to UU!
A. The baritone chords uses the same shapes as the standard uke chords, but they are in a different key. So, the shape has a different name in that tuning. So, what is a C chord for GCEA tuning becomes a G chord for DGBE tuning. The Baritone tuning is like a Guitar, except without the 5th and 6th strings, so you can use the same chord charts if necessary if you can ignore the extra strings. There are some books for baritone players.

B. Your friend might want to check out the U Bass by Kala.

C. I have heard that you can get special strings for tuning your bari to GCEA. String thickness needs to be adjusted for some tunings, otherwise strings would break if tuned too high, and go rubbery if tuned too low. String thickness needs to be optimized for the best tone.

D. There are some baby Les Paul ukes out there already (google), so shop around. I think once you plug in, it becomes more guitar-like in sound. If you go to steel strings and plug in, I think it will sound very much like an electric guitar. There is also a mini Epiphone Pee Wee 6 string electric. Make sure you only use steel strings on an instrument that was design for that. Ukes with non metal strings might not have a strong enough neck to handle the extra tension.

You came to the right place. We all love ukes here. Would love to see your uke band when it's ready.
–Lori

strumsilly
03-10-2011, 07:10 AM
I have my bari tuned GCEA using Southcoast linear strings, none wound, sounds great.

Pine Apple Slim
03-10-2011, 07:14 AM
<<<<<<<<b) a friend, guitar player, wants a bass AND a ukulele. Just for silliness sake, could, should he wish, a baritone uke be tuned like a bass (an octave or two up, of course)? Or is it tuned like that already?>>>>>>>>
<<<<<<B. Your friend might want to check out the U Bass by Kala.>>>>>>>

Baritone Uke is tuned like the high 4 strings of a guitar DGBe, the uBass is tuned like the lower 4 strings of a guitar EADG, except down low in the same octave as a bass guitar.
I'm wanting a uBass really bad right now myself.

PoisonDart
03-10-2011, 07:20 AM
Baritone really DOES help fill out the sound of ensemble ukuleles, imo.

ukulelecowboy
03-10-2011, 08:29 AM
Baritone ukuleles are great instruments and really versatile. Although they tend to be "shoehorned" into a DGBE tuning class ala the last four strings of a traditional guitar, they can be setup in a variety of ways with different tunings. I play baritone only in my stage ukuleles, I have instruments set up the following ways:

DGBE (linear "g" tuning with a low "d" string)
dGBE (re-entrant "g" tuning. The "d" string is tuned an octave above)
GCEA (linear "c" tuning with a low "g" string)
gCEA (re-entrant "c" tuning with a high "g" string)
CGDA (tenor guitar tuning or in fifths)

This allows me a great deal of versatility when playing as I can choose a specific "quality of sound" for different songs, etc. Although I play primarily GCEA tuning, the variables are nice.

As mentioned in a previous reply, the chord shapes are the same but DGBE tuning is essentially 5 steps lower (i.e., if you capo'd a DGBE baritone at the fifth fret the tuning would basically be GCEA) This makes transposition on the fly fairly easy.

Although I can't afford it now, it would be nice to have a custom double neck baritone to handle two different tunings (say, linear and re-entrant) simultaneously. Of course, I could go this route as well:

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b75/ADDmodeler/Rick_Nielsen.jpg

That would handle just about everything. ;) As far as electric baritone ukuleles, I own and play two different models.
A Jupiter Creek Steel String Telecaster:

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b75/ADDmodeler/jupitercreek.jpg

and an Eleuke Baritone Nylon String:

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b75/ADDmodeler/EleUke_BCJ100_FMH_Flamed_Mahogany_Baritone_model.j pg

They are both alot of fun to play and can handle the litany of standard effects, pedals, etc. and are nice for very specific applications.

Thanks!

ichadwick
03-11-2011, 08:26 AM
a) I know the tuning is different. I'd assume this means how you play chords is different, too, yes?
Is there somewhere that has these listed? Or are they, in fact, the same finger placements?
Yes and no. If you play the same chord shapes, the pitch is different (five frets lower in tone). For example, G on a tenor-soprano is 0232, but the same shape on a baritone makes it D.


b) a friend, guitar player, wants a bass AND a ukulele. Just for silliness sake, could, should he wish, a baritone uke be tuned like a bass (an octave or two up, of course)? Or is it tuned like that already?
No. A bass is tuned like the last four strings of a guitar (EADG). A uke is tuned like the first four strings (DGBE for baritone).


c) If the chords ARE, in fact, different, can a baritone ukulele be tuned to GCEA? I mean, I assume it CAN be done, but is there a reason it isn't?
Yes, you can buy string sets for GCEA but why make it sound like a tenor when you can buy a tenor? The string tension for CGEA is also greater and makes the strings very, very tight. I think it loses in sound (I've done it).


d) Because of the longer (and I assume thicker) strings, would using a pickup and using distortion sound more like a guitar? Would making a solid body, with steel strings and, say, a humbucker, sound more like a guitar? (I ask, as ANOTHER friend, who also plays guitar, was cracking up at the idea of doing a ukulele rock band, with all the loudness that entails and thought the idea of, in his words, "a teeny version of my Les Paul" was hilarious... and charming, but he's thinking that, after a little research, having someone on baritone might fill the sound out better, if EVERYONE's playing ukuleles.)
If you want a solid-body baritone, check out Jupiter Creek's ukes. Humbuckers won't work on nylon strings, only steel.