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Rosspeterson1993
03-14-2011, 11:35 AM
hey so i was going through uncle rods boot camp practice sheet 3 key of g and it shows Am7 and c6 both just open on all the strings is this right or a typo?

Eric Blooduke
03-14-2011, 11:38 AM
It is correct Am7 & C6 are both open on all strings, no typo.

Ambient Doughnut
03-14-2011, 11:42 AM
It's right, just one of those quirks.

Am7 is composed of A(1st) C(flat3rd) E(5th) and G(flat7)
C6 is composed of C(1st) E(3rd) G(5th) and A(6th)

same notes, different order!

Hope that helps :)

ksiegel
03-14-2011, 11:43 AM
Well... the Hal Leonard Chord Finder is in agreement with Uncle Rod, for at least one of the positions for Am7.

The book gives these three examples: 0000 2433 2213(eighth fret)

I tend to play the chord 2030 - again, a leftover from guitar days.

Try them all, and use what a) sounds best, and b) works best with your chord progression.

-Kurt

Huna
03-14-2011, 11:46 AM
check out some of the chord resources online like this one, a reverse chord finder. Theres lots of ways to play chords.

http://www.praiseuke.com/blog/?page_id=43

http://chordlist.brian-amberg.de/en/ukulele/standard/Am7/

http://www.ezfolk.com/uke/chords/A_major/Am7/am7.html

Rosspeterson1993
03-14-2011, 11:49 AM
alright thanks guys those explanations made zero sense to me but i got my answer haha

ichadwick
03-14-2011, 01:06 PM
It's in part because the uke has only four strings, so the number of notes you can play is limited. If a chord requires five or even six notes and you can only play four - well it's likely that those same four notes might also be in another chord.

SailingUke
03-14-2011, 01:13 PM
the diminished chords all have multiple names for the same fingering.
Ian is correct about only having four strings, so sometimes you need to leave a note out of a chord.
If you are playing with a bass player they will usually have the root note covered, also when you are singing the melody may provide the root.

Plainsong
03-14-2011, 01:33 PM
That's the fun thing about uke. Everyone else is playing a chord where the root is where it should be, but we get funky inversions without even trying. All the same notes, different order. It's a fun theory thing. :)

Sanagi
03-16-2011, 01:15 PM
If you have someone backing you up on bass and he's playing 'A' under your open string strumming, it's an A minor chord with G added - G being the 7th note of the A minor scale that makes it an Am7 chord. If the bass man plays 'C', it's a C chord with A suspended - that's the '6' of the C major scale that makes it a C6 chord. If you're playing by yourself with no bass, whether the ear interprets it as 'A' or 'C' will depend on the chords before and after it. If it goes by quickly enough people probably won't notice that there's a difference at all.

Welcome to the ambiguous world of music theory!

padre.will
03-20-2011, 12:26 PM
ok, as long as we're on confusing things for noobs, the various chords that Uncle Rod shows as diminished (all same 4-fingered shape up and down the neck) are listed on my iPhone chord finder app as dim7 chords. and the diminished chords have other shapes. 'splain, someone, please?

OldePhart
03-20-2011, 01:07 PM
ok, as long as we're on confusing things for noobs, the various chords that Uncle Rod shows as diminished (all same 4-fingered shape up and down the neck) are listed on my iPhone chord finder app as dim7 chords. and the diminished chords have other shapes. 'splain, someone, please?

The short version or long version? The short version is these are technically dim7 chords but they are the only easy way to make dim chords and you can use the dim7 almost anywhere you'll see a dim - in fact, the dim 7 chord is almost always the actual chord used in most songs for reasons the explaining of which requires a fair amount of boring music theory.

Sanagi
03-20-2011, 06:02 PM
The diminished seven is the ultimate multipurpose dominant function chord and is really easy to play on uke so there's not much call to play the triad version without the seventh. I tend to prefer the minor seven version of a diminished chord, which is also quite do-able. There's also the dominant flat nine, but we four-stringers have trouble getting across the full impact of that one.

Nickie
03-23-2011, 06:51 AM
I don't even understand this well enough to be confused by it. I'm just baffled... clueless.