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mangorockfish
03-24-2011, 02:25 PM
I know this has been discussed here many times, but I need to know how to learn to play without a teacher. I have a lot of time to practice, being out on the road three to four weeks at a time, but the time I have is late at night, so the lessons on here are out. What would be the best things to practice? I want to learn to finger-pick and learn "ukulele music therory". I know I need to learn scales and have looked at the tutorials on here, but the red and blue dots gets confusing. I don't understand where to start and stop. I know quite a few chords and a few songs which is a good start, but I want to learn more than that. What do I do?

itsme
03-24-2011, 03:33 PM
If you want to learn to fingerpick, then the first thing you should do is work on learning to read tabs. Not just chords and lyrics for songs, but tabs that show you which fret and string to pick.

Ukulelehunt has a good primer on this:

http://ukulelehunt.com/how-to-read-ukulele-tab/

Wilfried Welti's "solobuch" has a lot of simple tunes, try ones you probably already know the melody to, like "Scarborough Fair" and "Greensleeves".

http://ukulelehunt.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/solobuch.pdf

sukie
03-24-2011, 07:14 PM
How about getting a copy of Ukulele Fretboard Roadmap? (please tell me that's the correct name) I've known some people that have used that and were really happy with it.

mangorockfish
03-24-2011, 07:17 PM
How about getting a copy of Ukulele Fretboard Roadmap? (please tell me that's the correct name) I've known some people that have used that and were really happy with it.
I've got that and it is good.

janeray1940
03-24-2011, 07:20 PM
How about getting a copy of Ukulele Fretboard Roadmap? (please tell me that's the correct name)

It's the correct name. Well, Ukulele Fretboard Roadmaps, plural, technically speaking :)

I highly recommend this book, but have to say that it can be kind of daunting to tackle on your own if you don't have much background in theory, or if you don't already play guitar. The chapters look short but they cover a lot of information! So if you do get this book, take it slow, a little at a time, and keep revisiting previous chapters.

The Roadmaps book covers scales, but I like these scales (http://liveukulele.com/tabs/scales/) too.

Kirrky
03-24-2011, 10:07 PM
The way I taught myself was youtube videos and looking up tabs. Lots and lots of youtube videos...I mean LOTS! Haha. Usually if there is a song I wanted to learn, I would just type in the name of the song in youtube followed by "tutorial" and I would just learn from there.

I am no way an expert myself, but I think you should try and get down the basic chords. Such as C, Am, F, and G.

Here are some websites that I have used during my journey of learning how to play the uke:

www.ukulele-tabs.com : I really used to like this site until there was copyright drama and they had to take the words off of the tabs that people posted. However, I still like to use the chord chart they have there from time to time.

www.ukulelehunt.com : Mentioned already but it's a great site that has tabs listed alphabetically, or even by difficulty! Learned many songs from that site :).

And of course...

www.ukuleleunderground.com : Aldrine Guerrero is the MAN! I've learned many things from his video lessons, and also from the youtube channel that he has (ukuleleoversoul). His tutorials for songs are beyond amazing, with slow-motions at the approriate times, and showing you step by step how to hold a chord.

It seems very daunting, but I guarantee you the journey of learning how to play the uke becomes much better once you are able to play one of your favorite songs. It will give you inspiration to keep going!

Good luck!

Edit: I just read your entire post, and realized my post is useless. -_-". Sorry buddy, can't help you on musical theory, I'm a complete newbie when it comes to that. Disregard this post if necessary.

kenikas
03-25-2011, 07:18 AM
I definately agree with the Fretboard Roadmaps recommendation, also both of John King's books "The Classical Ukulele" and "Famous Solos And Duets For The Ukulele" are very good. Another one I really like is Mark Nelson's "Learn To Play Fingerstyle Solos For Ukulele". As for more depth in to theory the "Music Theory For Dummies" and "The Complete Idiots Guide To Music Theory" both seem pretty good, but I've just started in to those.

bazmaz
03-25-2011, 12:58 PM
This site, and ukulele hunt are brilliant for tuition.

I run a blog that isnt really about tuition, but aims to deal with those other niggling questions that new uke players come across

You can find beginner tips here - http://www.gotaukulele.com/p/beginners-guides.html

joeybug
03-25-2011, 03:52 PM
I definately agree with the Fretboard Roadmaps recommendation, also both of John King's books "The Classical Ukulele" and "Famous Solos And Duets For The Ukulele" are very good. Another one I really like is Mark Nelson's "Learn To Play Fingerstyle Solos For Ukulele". As for more depth in to theory the "Music Theory For Dummies" and "The Complete Idiots Guide To Music Theory" both seem pretty good, but I've just started in to those.

I just brought the "Music Theory for Dummies" and am working my way through it, along with Ukulele Fretboard Roadmaps, and both are REALLY helping me come to graps with music theory in general as well as in regard to the Uke!