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View Full Version : 2 hole (puka) ukuleles



dnewton2
07-24-2008, 05:35 AM
So I have been looking to get a new uke sometime soon. I like the way the 2 hole ukes look and was wondering about them. Is there any advantage or disadvantage over single hole ukes, any sound differences or any thing other than looks about the two hole models? Thanks in advance for any feedback.

h-drix
07-24-2008, 06:19 AM
to my knowledge there isnt a HUGE diffrence (if there is even a diffrence at all), i think the reason for the change from two hole to one was that its easier for production. Intresting piece of tid bit from wiki



The majority of sound emanates from the surface area of both sounding boards, with sound holes playing a part by allowing the sounding boards to vibrate more freely, and by allowing some of the vibrations which have been set in motion inside the instrument to travel outside the instrument.

so yea, i think the one hole vs two hole question is just a matter of design and price.

experimentjon
07-24-2008, 06:49 PM
Well, my Applause has 14 holes. :) I personally have never tried a 2 hole uke, but I have always been interested in finding out if they sounded any different. But personally, they always looked a bit too phallic for my tastes (dont act like you've never thought about it)...so I would never consider buying one.

NotoriousMOK
07-24-2008, 09:52 PM
But personally, they always looked a bit too phallic for my tastes (dont act like you've never thought about it)...so I would never consider buying one.

actually, I never did, until NOW -- thanks jon! I'll never see the double puka the same again :(


. . . . i feel so . . . violated :cool:




:p

Kekani
07-24-2008, 10:29 PM
Actually, proper use of the two puka design a'la Steve Grimes' guitar for Keola Beamer is based on the premise that by moving the soundhole "up", you can allow for greater movement of the top to generate better bass response and greater sustain. Of course, this is dependant upon whether or not you keep the cross brace above the bridge in the same location or not. In application, this works better for smaller sized, bass challenged instruments.

Then again, that end result would also be the premise for the Kasha bracing, which opened the way for side ports, which found its way onto "traditionally" braced instruments. . . .

ichadwick
07-25-2008, 01:03 AM
Well, my Applause has 14 holes.
I have one of those, too, but the holes are small, and scattered around the soundboard like rain drops.

Wouldn't a side hole reduce the amount of energy being transmitted to the soundboard? Seems like it could add tone while lowering the volume.

deach
07-25-2008, 01:30 AM
.....But personally, they always looked a bit too phallic for my tastes (dont act like you've never thought about it).....

*Stops drooling......

Leroy
07-25-2008, 04:47 AM
I've made a few ukes with duel sound holes. It works very well. I agree with Kekani about the benefits of moving the sound holes away from the center of the sound board. Here are a couple pictures of two cigar box style baritone ukes I made recently. Both have extremely good tone and play well.

http://www.leroybeal.net/imageholding/elbari/02.jpg


http://www.leroybeal.net/imageholding/elbari/04.jpg

Keep on experimenting!


Leroy

Kekani
07-25-2008, 05:27 AM
Wouldn't a side hole reduce the amount of energy being transmitted to the soundboard? Seems like it could add tone while lowering the volume.

Energy to the soundboard is transmitted by torque on the bridge, from the strings. A side port, done improperly, would reduce the amount of stiffness in the side, thus potentially reducing the energy transmitted to the back. In that case, its usually (not always) the higher end customs that tend to take advantage of the back plates as a contributing factor to overall sound. Ovation obviously doesn't apply (except maybe from a shape standpoint).

On the other hand, and contrary to what may seem true, those builders that incorporate side ports correctly end up with an increase in volume and greater overall balance in tone. Unfortunately, there may not be too many guys doing it correctly, meaning, they're done because others have done it, as opposed to being done because that's how their instrument is designed.

-Aaron

Dino
07-30-2008, 11:49 AM
Actually, proper use of the two puka design a'la Steve Grimes' guitar for Keola Beamer is based on the premise that by moving the soundhole "up", you can allow for greater movement of the top to generate better bass response and greater sustain. Of course, this is dependant upon whether or not you keep the cross brace above the bridge in the same location or not. In application, this works better for smaller sized, bass challenged instruments.

Then again, that end result would also be the premise for the Kasha bracing, which opened the way for side ports, which found its way onto "traditionally" braced instruments. . . .

I actually own a Tangi 2-hole uke so I asked him about it. He said the main difference is the extra hole. hahaha. Actually he said its like a ported speaker. It supposed to give off more low tones that you feel more than hear, but its a theory that is hard to prove because each wood used for a uke has its own personality where some single hole ukes give off better base than a 2 holed one. Either way, I love the unique look of it.