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Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-03-2011, 05:40 PM
I just completed this tenor. I always hate letting fiddleback koa like this go. They just don't grow it like that anymore. The inlay is scrimshawed fossil mastodon ivory.

Chris Tarman
04-03-2011, 05:41 PM
That back is AMAZING!

UncleElvis
04-03-2011, 05:48 PM
Speechless.

I apologize, Mr. Moore, that I cannot come up with a better compliment than...

WANT!

Chris Tarman
04-03-2011, 05:54 PM
That back is AMAZING!

The rest of it ain't half bad, either! I didn't mean to leave the other bits out!

Ronnie Aloha
04-03-2011, 05:59 PM
Geez Chuck, what array of colors do you have for your inlays?

RyanMFT
04-03-2011, 06:00 PM
Wow, Chuck....as always, your work is an amazing combination of art/luthiery!

Lexxy
04-03-2011, 06:04 PM
Wow. is all i have to say..

Sake1one
04-03-2011, 06:10 PM
wow. the fiddleback is hands down the best curl, looks freakin awesome!

angrygnome
04-03-2011, 06:12 PM
Incredible... absolutely beautiful uke. I aspire to one day own one of your playable pieces of art. :)

mm stan
04-03-2011, 06:23 PM
Aloha Chuck,
Absoutlely Beautiful....no one asked yet...can I ask how much?????and is it for sale????

Bradford
04-03-2011, 06:25 PM
I hear you about the wood Chuck, but at least it grows where you live. I'm hoping that I can find some at the GAL convention this summer.

Brad

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-03-2011, 06:27 PM
Aloha Chuck,
Absoutlely Beautiful....no one asked yet...can I ask how much?????and is it for sale????

It's on my web site mm stan (or is it just mm? hmmm). It's already sold though.

Kalihonu
04-03-2011, 06:31 PM
WOW! That is amazing, bet it sounds even Moore Bettah then it looks !!!

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-03-2011, 06:34 PM
Geez Chuck, what array of colors do you have for your inlays?

Recon stone (reconstituted stone or composite stone) is pretty cool stuff. I have no idea what it's made of--epoxy and floor sweepings? I don't know. That particular piece is turquoise recon. I had cut some strips to use as purfling but changed my mind at the last moment. I was going to carry the vine through the fret board too but the color was too overwhelming. A little bit of turquoise goes a long way and part of the key to a good design is knowing when to hold back. In this case I let the gorgeous koa carry the load visually. The top and side turquoise fret markers were enough. Turns out I didn't even have to make them. LMI sells them!

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-03-2011, 06:39 PM
I hear you about the wood Chuck, but at least it grows where you live. I'm hoping that I can find some at the GAL convention this summer.

Brad

They say it's here Brad, although I rarely see anything great anymore. I've boughten cars for what this set cost me. You'll probably have better luck getting koa from Creps up in Slopez than I have here. That set was part of my "Retirement Koa Stash".

mm stan
04-03-2011, 06:42 PM
It's on my web site mm stan (or is it just mm? hmmm). It's already sold though.
Aloha Chuck,
Awwwww man.....and that blue makes it pop...wow wee.....Guess I better check out your website...got any extra's you holding out on..hee hee...oh yeah, for you Chuck, it's Stan....
MM was initially for Mahalo Much or Many Mahalo's...used in closing my postings... MM Stan.

Sven
04-03-2011, 07:37 PM
Very good looking uke Chuck. I think you're right about the point at which to hold back, although that point may well come a lot later for you than for example me.

But we have so much in common, you and I!! I also... build... my instruments. Of. Wood.

Sven

Hippie Dribble
04-03-2011, 07:51 PM
Chuck, left field question: roughly how long is your waiting list at the moment?

Michael Smith
04-03-2011, 08:02 PM
The Master Strikes Again!!. Out of this world beautiful Chuck. And the nude is actually beautiful. I have seen a lot of female form inlays that are butt ugly. This one is really nice. Bravo!!
Would you be willing to share how you went about the scrimshaw? I'm trying to figure out what gravers I should get to do simple things like making a white pearl flower look a little more real.

Steve vanPelt
04-03-2011, 08:40 PM
That is one seriously beautiful uke. What cracks me up is that you give the credit to the wood. Yes, it's a sweet piece of koa, but what you've done with it blows me away. (as usual) Thanks for posting the pics.

Allen
04-03-2011, 11:43 PM
Understated in just the right way Chuck. You've got a gift mate. I'm a big fan of your work.

Ronnie Aloha
04-04-2011, 04:56 AM
Is it possible to meet the model in person?

lancemanion
04-04-2011, 05:45 AM
On the next Ukulele Funbuild I think you should be in charge of the headstock!!!

Flyfish57
04-04-2011, 06:26 AM
Wonderful work yet again Chuck! The headstock is a work of art and the rosette is a wonderful contrast for that crazy Koa!

fahrner
04-04-2011, 06:54 AM
The design and execution is absolutely phenomenal Chuck.

Bradford
04-04-2011, 07:16 AM
They say it's here Brad, although I rarely see anything great anymore. I've boughten cars for what this set cost me. You'll probably have better luck getting koa from Creps up in Slopez than I have here. That set was part of my "Retirement Koa Stash".

I am looking forward to seeing Bruce this summer. It is funny how things work, I'm sitting here in Oregon, surrounded by Sitka spruce trees and I can't buy it locally.
Brad

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-04-2011, 07:21 AM
Would you be willing to share how you went about the scrimshaw? I'm trying to figure out what gravers I should get to do simple things like making a white pearl flower look a little more real.

Scrimshaw and engraving are two different things using different tools and materials.
Scrimshaw is done in relatively soft material (ivory) with knives (#11 Exacto blade) or sharp stylus that is poked into the work or drawn toward you.
With engraving, the working material is much harder (shell) and the gravers are pushed away rather than pulled toward you. Any new graver needs to be cut, resharpened and the handle modeled to fit your hand. In my experience (I was a full time scrimshaw artist at one time) engraving is more difficult than scrimshaw. Using a stippling technique (as well as cutting) scrimshaw allows you to achieve finer shading than engraving does which is done by cutting lines and cross hatching. Study some of the old Durer prints for excellent examples of engraving.
I have yet to master engraving but I haven't explored it thoroughly. Shell is very hard and the graver is hard to control. Guys like Grit Laskin, Larry Robinson, and Harvey Leach make it look easy.
If I were you I would contact Larry Robinson. I think he is still in Valley Ford, which if I'm not mistaken is your neck of the woods. He could probably tell you what gravers to use. He even occasionally gives workshops. Or just get the set from Stew Mac and start messing around.
EDIT: I've also had pretty good luck with the carbide stylus sold by Rio Grande. Unlike the blunt carbide styluses commonly sold through tool catalogues, the Rio Grande stylus comes with two sizes of tips and it allows for very fine work. Because it can be drawn toward you OR pushed away from you, it allows you to do nice curved work. With any engraving it takes a VERY stead hand and good REFLECTED light. And lots of practice.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-04-2011, 07:31 AM
Here's a close up of the turquoise recon stone rosette. Recon stone is available through Rescue Pearl (my favorite) or MaseCraft.

dkcrown
04-04-2011, 05:40 PM
Ahhhhh. Fiddleback. Nice Chuck

maclay
04-04-2011, 06:02 PM
Beautiful work Chuck.
I would love to get one of these in my hands, for a closer look inside and out.

Jake Maclay
Hive Ukuleles
http://www.hiveukuleles.com

mm stan
04-04-2011, 06:20 PM
Aloha Chuck,
Mahalo for sharing all you wisdom and knowledge with us, may you have a tenfold in returns...just love that re con stone...wonder it they can add pearl grains into that compound for that added bling..or would
that be over doing it??? like the pearl paint in cars....

Vic D
04-05-2011, 03:38 AM
Phenomenal work as always Chuck. In another thread you mentioned that you use acrylic filler instead of the old gaskins type. What exactly is the stuff and where could one get it? Also, do you ever run into trouble trying to mate up woods with recon stone and pearl?

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
04-05-2011, 06:44 AM
Phenomenal work as always Chuck. In another thread you mentioned that you use acrylic filler instead of the old gaskins type. What exactly is the stuff and where could one get it? Also, do you ever run into trouble trying to mate up woods with recon stone and pearl?

I use artist's alkyds, you know, the kind that comes in tubes, available at any art store. High quality brands like Windsor/Newton are best because the pigment is vert finely ground. I like alkyds better than oils because it will dry within a day.

I don't understand what you mean by mating up materials. Wood, shell, stone, etc, will al move at a different rate. In time you may notice some witness lines on the seams of the inlay pieces, especially with a glossy lacquer finish. This is normal and barely noticeable. I've seem to see it only with the recon stone, not with the other materials.
The other thing to watch out for when mixing inlay materials is to pay attention to the reflective nature of each. Make the things you want to stand out reflective (pearl shell) and the things you want to push into the background non reflective (wood or comp).
Also, when mixing materials you'll find that most of them will be different thicknesses. For that reason I always build my inlays upside down (on waxed paper) so that the top side will be flat and I try to inlay it as flush to the surface as I can.
Hope this answers your question.