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kuke2
04-13-2011, 05:15 AM
Hi,

I am a noob at the uke but I'm serious about learning it. I am in a folk band, and I need to learn most/all of the chords in about a month and a half. I have played piano for years and am pretty knowledgeable about music theory in general.

Basically, my goal would be to learn uke chords by understanding the way the fretboard is setup. I don't want to learn chords just by playing songs. (If that makes any sense!)

Any help would be appreciated! Thanks! :D

fitncrafty
04-13-2011, 05:18 AM
Here you go.. This is the ukulele Boot camp by uncle Rod.. Great stuff.. here's a link to download the file.

http://www.4shared.com/document/WI3SRGwf/Ukulele_Boot_Camp_rev.html

kuke2
04-13-2011, 05:38 AM
Thanks for sharing that! I am actually going through the Boot Camp right now, but I'm trying to find a way to understand the layout of the fretboard. When I learned to play piano, I learned the notes and where to find the notes on the keyboard. Similarly, I want to learn where to find the chords on the fretboard of the uke. I know I'm not explaining myself very clearly!

Kanaka916
04-13-2011, 06:02 AM
Maybe this will help . . . Chord Theory (http://www.kauairainbow.com/Ukulele/Chord%20Theory/Theory.html) or Ukulele Fretboard (http://www.ukulelestrummers.com/Ukefretboard.html)

kuke2
04-13-2011, 06:42 AM
Thanks! That definitely does help!

janeray1940
04-13-2011, 06:44 AM
Online fretboard identification tutorial (http://www.musictheory.net/exercises). Choose Fretboard Identification, Customize = Yes, Instrument = ukulele, etc.

kuke2
04-14-2011, 03:40 AM
Oh, amazing! Thanks for your help. :)

itsme
04-14-2011, 06:43 AM
Many people have recommended the book "Ukulele Fretboard Roadmaps" by Fred Sokolow and Jim Beloff.

kuke2
04-14-2011, 07:50 AM
I had noticed that...thanks for reminding me! I'll look into it. :)

Gmoney
04-14-2011, 08:04 AM
Online fretboard identification tutorial (http://www.musictheory.net/exercises). Choose Fretboard Identification, Customize = Yes, Instrument = ukulele, etc.

I've NEVER seen that one! THANKS!

Gmoney
04-14-2011, 08:06 AM
Many people have recommended the book "Ukulele Fretboard Roadmaps" by Fred Sokolow and Jim Beloff.

I bought that book a few months ago & it just never "clicked" for me. I just couldn't wrap my head around it or other "movable chord" instruction. BUT, last week, it finally began to make sense & I have to say that I think I finally am "getting it" - NOTE: FAR from "By Jove, I think he's got it!"

But improving!

janeray1940
04-14-2011, 08:11 AM
I bought that book a few months ago & it just never "clicked" for me. I just couldn't wrap my head around it or other "movable chord" instruction. BUT, last week, it finally began to make sense & I have to say that I think I finally am "getting it" - NOTE: FAR from "By Jove, I think he's got it!"

But improving!

I've had that book for two years now. It only started to make sense to me when I began taking a class with Fred, who wrote it :)

If you have a guitar background, or music theory background, the book is great. For those of us without that advantage, it's a little daunting, but not impossible.

Glad you're finding the online fretboard identification thingamabob helpful!

ukukimmy
04-14-2011, 08:19 AM
Glad to have read this post. Thanks for sharing!

ukukimmy
04-15-2011, 02:28 PM
Many people have recommended the book "Ukulele Fretboard Roadmaps" by Fred Sokolow and Jim Beloff.

Just picked up a cipy today after reading this thread. Thanks!

Hippie Dribble
04-16-2011, 02:41 AM
Online fretboard identification tutorial (http://www.musictheory.net/exercises). Choose Fretboard Identification, Customize = Yes, Instrument = ukulele, etc.

Fantastic Jane. That is a really awesome link. Thanks so much. :)

roxhum
04-16-2011, 03:32 AM
Fantastic Jane. That is a really awesome link. Thanks so much.

Ditto! That is really awesome.

OldePhart
04-16-2011, 05:30 AM
I don't play the keyboard but my limited understanding of it is that, with the exception of "classical" players who follow dots on paper, keyboard players primarily work with shapes. I.e. a major chord shape, minor chord shape, etc., all from the triad patterns which are very clearly illustrated on a keyboard because of its linear layout.

Assuming that is the sort of keyboard playing that you do, you will probably be most comfortable learning the barre chord shapes and the relationships or "box" patterns associated with them. This is an analog of chording on a keyboard, in that you have relatively few hand "shapes" and you move those vertically up and down the fretboard very similar to the way a keyboard player moves their shapes horizontally along the keyboard.

If that sounds like something that will work for you, you might want to download the "M" and "box" diagrams from this page (http://www.praiseuke.com/blog/?page_id=10).

John

PhilUSAFRet
04-16-2011, 08:27 AM
I believe there is an app for your cellphone, although I can't help you find it!