PDA

View Full Version : Any other mandolin players here?



mentalfloss
08-04-2008, 03:23 AM
I am a novice mandolin player at it for a couple of years. I have found it very hard to play but very rewarding. I just love the sound.
I picked up the uke on a whim because my daughter is so very good with it and I noticed how nice the ukulele sounds with different types of music.
I am wondering if there are any other mandolin players here that also play the uke?
If so, I have a question. Does playing and learning the ukulele help with playing the mandolin?

I know that that mandolins are tuned in 5 ths. and all but it seems that because the uke is easier to get started playing at a somewhat reasonable level.
Maybe I am just having so much fun on the tenor cigar box that I really do not care how I sound.
I have noticed that the strumming of the uke has helped me on the mandolin already.
It is not too fair of a comparison though because I have only played the mandolin for about 2 minutes since Tom Guy sent me the cigar box.

UKISOCIETY
08-04-2008, 04:22 AM
I am a novice mandolin player at it for a couple of years. I have found it very hard to play but very rewarding. I just love the sound.
I picked up the uke on a whim because my daughter is so very good with it and I noticed how nice the ukulele sounds with different types of music.
I am wondering if there are any other mandolin players here that also play the uke?
If so, I have a question. Does playing and learning the ukulele help with playing the mandolin?

I know that that mandolins are tuned in 5 ths. and all but it seems that because the uke is easier to get started playing at a somewhat reasonable level.
Maybe I am just having so much fun on the tenor cigar box that I really do not care how I sound.
I have noticed that the strumming of the uke has helped me on the mandolin already.
It is not too fair of a comparison though because I have only played the mandolin for about 2 minutes since Tom Guy sent me the cigar box.


I play both (the uke much better than the mandolin). Playing the uke doesn't help in learning the mandolin, imo. The chording is different and the strings feel much different. To me, the mandolin's tuning seem much more intuitive than the uke. You might find that soloing is easier on the mandolin because of that.

Also, you use a pick with the mando. You even hold the pick differently than you would a pick on an uke.

I tried tuning the mandolin like a ukulele but I didn't like it a bit. I've read that some people have done it and like it. But I think it changes the sound of the mando and the instrument loses a bit of its distinctive personality.

I enjoy playing both, but since I'm better with the uke I play that more.

mentalfloss
08-04-2008, 09:12 AM
I think it is about confidence. I just feel more confident early in the process with the uke.
I will always keep a mandolin around and go to camps and jam with it. But....I get so much joy from the UKULELE.
Also...
you get so much uke for your money compared to the mandolin.:o

mentalfloss
08-04-2008, 09:15 AM
[
I tried tuning the mandolin like a ukulele but I didn't like it a bit. I've read that some people have done it and like it. But I think it changes the sound of the mando and the instrument loses a bit of its distinctive personality.

I enjoy playing both, but since I'm better with the uke I play that more.[/QUOTE]

Alan have you or anyone else tried tuning the uke like a mandolin.GDAE like a single course mandolin?
I have heard of the cavaquino tuned like that.:music:

UKISOCIETY
08-04-2008, 09:19 AM
[
I tried tuning the mandolin like a ukulele but I didn't like it a bit. I've read that some people have done it and like it. But I think it changes the sound of the mando and the instrument loses a bit of its distinctive personality.

I enjoy playing both, but since I'm better with the uke I play that more.

Alan have you or anyone else tried tuning the uke like a mandolin.GDAE like a single course mandolin?
I have heard of the cavaquino tuned like that.:music:[/QUOTE]

I've never tried it. Might be interesting to try.

UKISOCIETY
08-04-2008, 09:23 AM
Also...
you get so much uke for your money compared to the mandolin.:o

tru dat! I've got my eye on a couple of Breedlove mandolins that I'd love to own someday. Current price around $2000.

Which isn't that bad considering those pricey Gibson signature models. I told Sam Bush that I had recently seen his signature Gibson for sale. He kinda grumbled. It sells for $29,000. Sounds crappy i bet. Gibson aint what it used to be! Sam plays a Gibson (or is it The Gibson?) from 1911. Beat up but man! What a sound!

deach
08-04-2008, 09:30 AM
tru dat! I've got my eye on a couple of Breedlove mandolins that I'd love to own someday. Current price around $2000.

Which isn't that bad considering those pricey Gibson signature models. I told Sam Bush that I had recently seen his signature Gibson for sale. He kinda grumbled. It sells for $29,000. Sounds crappy i bet. Gibson aint what it used to be! Sam plays a Gibson (or is it The Gibson?) from 1911. Beat up but man! What a sound!

I bet it doesn't even come with a chord book or a pitch pipe.

VengefulTikiGod
08-04-2008, 12:00 PM
I think it is about confidence. I just feel more confident early in the process with the uke.
I will always keep a mandolin around and go to camps and jam with it. But....I get so much joy from the UKULELE.
Also...
you get so much uke for your money compared to the mandolin.:o

No kidding. For 200-300 you can get a solid mahogany Ohana. If you're spending that money one a mando, you can get a crappy Rogue with mile-high action and frets that will give you tetanus...

Until you're paying at least 500-800, most low-end mandos are essentially toys, and nearly unplayable. I think most Rogue mandolins are purchased by small guitar stores to fill up shelf space and create the illusion of better selection. Of course, the same thing can be said for ukuleles... how many times have you gone into a guitar store and found the "token ukulele" and "token mandolin"? :mad:

UKISOCIETY
08-04-2008, 12:01 PM
I bet it doesn't even come with a chord book or a pitch pipe.

The 1911 one? It did, but it was more like a pan pipe. Like Zamfir, master of the pan flute remember him?

I've eaten pan-fried flute before but it didn't strike a chord with me...:eek:

mentalfloss
08-04-2008, 04:03 PM
No kidding. For 200-300 you can get a solid mahogany Ohana. If you're spending that money one a mando, you can get a crappy Rogue with mile-high action and frets that will give you tetanus...

Until you're paying at least 500-800, most low-end mandos are essentially toys, and nearly unplayable. I think most Rogue mandolins are purchased by small guitar stores to fill up shelf space and create the illusion of better selection. Of course, the same thing can be said for ukuleles... how many times have you gone into a guitar store and found the "token ukulele" and "token mandolin"? :mad:

You are right vengfultikigod....You could spend $500 and still get a wall hanger mandolin. $750 and up to about 1500 for what you could spend for the same quality of that ohana you talked about.
I have had better luck in the value to price with luthiers that are just getting started or are kind of unknown. Like ukelele luthiers there are some good ones out there.
you can get a pretty dang good uke for $500 to $750. I just am amazed.

tori8984
08-09-2008, 09:59 AM
I bought myself a mandolin from mandolin hut (low end bean blossom) and I can say that the only thing that has helped me is that I laugh when I read that someone has sore fingers from playing ukulele or guitar. I use my mandolin to cut diamonds.