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View Full Version : My new uke has "Adjustable" friction tuners?? Howdothesework??



mthurman52
06-09-2011, 04:34 PM
I just got in my Koloa concert uke! Absolutely stunning, but I am having tuning issues of course. I have never had friction tuners so I am wondering if constant tuning (and I mean constant) is normal and how long the break in period is. Also these are "adjustable" tuners. They have spacer like rings on them. How do these work and is there anything I can turn or tweak to help the tuning issue?

mandrew
06-09-2011, 05:29 PM
Usually you just tighten the tension by turning the screw on the end of the tuners. Standard tuners had a small screw that you adjust with a screwdriver. In these, it looks like you just turn the knerled adjuster, and it compresses the spring, increasing tension. It is normal for strings to stretch a lot for 2-3 weeks until they are tamed don. That depends on how much you play them, of course.

Gmoney
06-09-2011, 05:34 PM
"Using the Schaller Tuning Peg

Loosen the knurled thumb-screw until you can easily turn the tuning peg with some tension remaining. When the string is brought to pitch, tighten the thumbscrew slightly, check the pitch, then tighten the thumbscrew fully. Finger-tightening is all that is needed; the use of tools is likely to damage the tuner. A little experience will help determine the amount of loosening and readjusting you have to do with the thumbscrew and tuning key. Generally, firm pressure works best. Loosening the screw too much will cause the tuning key to slip.

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
06-09-2011, 07:36 PM
My Kamaka has those pegs, too. When I first got my ukulele, three of the four were falling a little flat every time I tuned. First I loosened all four tuner so that none of the strings would hold pitch at all. Then I tightened each tuner a quarter turn or so and checked if the strings would still pull flat. I repeated this (lots of times) until all four strings held pitch and none of the tuners were sliding back. Now they're working great.

TCK
06-09-2011, 08:00 PM
Schaller's are great, but there is a learning curve. Just do exactly what G-money said and it will all work out, but you will tune a lot during the next week. After that, you will love them- I promise

bbycrts
06-10-2011, 05:42 AM
I just got in my Koloa concert uke! Absolutely stunning, but I am having tuning issues of course. I have never had friction tuners so I am wondering if constant tuning (and I mean constant) is normal and how long the break in period is. Also these are "adjustable" tuners. They have spacer like rings on them. How do these work and is there anything I can turn or tweak to help the tuning issue?

Okay, given it's a Koloa, those are very poor reproduction Schallers. Everything else about the uke is really nice (I have a soprano Koloa and like it more and more). After I cut my finger on one of those horrid tuners (no joke) I ordered a set of Taisamlu tuners from eBay and couldn't be happier. They work very well and were a drop-in fit. I actually changed them out while sitting at my desk at work. I can't recommend them more highly. They look a lot nicer, to boot, and they're not expensive at all!

link to eBay for Taisamlu tuners (http://cgi.ebay.com/Chrome-Machine-heads-Ukulele-button-4-ps-229N-UB-/360331464283?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item53e56dce5b#ht_2760wt_905)

They do a "best offer" - I actually got mine for the asking price but shipped free - $12 for quality ukulele tuners that really work well! Several other knobs are available...

(No, not a representative of the company - I just like their tuners that much and hated the stock Koloa tuners that much!)

janeray1940
06-10-2011, 06:16 AM
"Using the Schaller Tuning Peg

Loosen the knurled thumb-screw until you can easily turn the tuning peg with some tension remaining. When the string is brought to pitch, tighten the thumbscrew slightly, check the pitch, then tighten the thumbscrew fully. Finger-tightening is all that is needed; the use of tools is likely to damage the tuner. A little experience will help determine the amount of loosening and readjusting you have to do with the thumbscrew and tuning key. Generally, firm pressure works best. Loosening the screw too much will cause the tuning key to slip.

Uh oh, wait a minute. I don't want to hijack this thread but - you mean to tell me I'm not supposed to use a screwdriver on my Schallers? Because I can't get the screws to turn without one.

Does "thumbscrew" mean the screw with the slot in it? I found the original page that the above quote came from but it's all text, no pictures! Help a visual learner out please :) Thank you!

TheOnlyUkeThatMatters
06-10-2011, 06:30 AM
I don't think it should matter if Schaller tuners are tightened by hand or using a screwdriver, as long as they aren't over-tightened. I'm guessing over-tightening could damage the mechanism. Just tighten the tuners (using any method) as much as necessary to hold pitch and you should be good.

If the tuners are turning freely and holding pitch, I'll bet they're okay.

strumsilly
06-10-2011, 06:48 AM
Okay, given it's a Koloa, those are very poor reproduction Schallers. Everything else about the uke is really nice (I have a soprano Koloa and like it more and more). After I cut my finger on one of those horrid tuners (no joke) I ordered a set of Taisamlu tuners from eBay and couldn't be happier. They work very well and were a drop-in fit. I actually changed them out while sitting at my desk at work. I can't recommend them more highly. They look a lot nicer, to boot, and they're not expensive at all!

I wonder if they would fit my vintage Gibson with out modification. they are worn out and only 3 are original.

olgoat52
06-10-2011, 06:54 AM
I wonder if they would fit my vintage Gibson with out modification. they are worn out and only 3 are original.

Considering how much you have invested in the Gibson, a $15 experiment should be nothing. :)

janeray1940
06-10-2011, 07:02 AM
I don't think it should matter if Schaller tuners are tightened by hand or using a screwdriver, as long as they aren't over-tightened. I'm guessing over-tightening could damage the mechanism. Just tighten the tuners (using any method) as much as necessary to hold pitch and you should be good.

If the tuners are turning freely and holding pitch, I'll bet they're okay.

Thanks! Had a moment of panic there when I thought I might have done some damage. One of the Kamaka concerts had a couple of super tight tuners that I couldn't even turn at first. I loosened them up just enough for my wimpy girl-hands to turn them, and they've been fine ever since.