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View Full Version : Strumming is letting go



kevsumac
06-10-2011, 09:00 AM
Not to get all profound or anything, but I feel strumming is all about letting go and letting you hand to what it WANTS to do. I'll start strumming a pattern, fretting just one chord, I'll get into the groove and my strumming is good. If I allow myself to think about the pattern I'm strumming for a millisecond it all goes in the crapper. The left brain in me needs me think through every down and up stroke which totally screws up my strumming.:p

bornagainjeeper
06-10-2011, 09:17 AM
Not to get all profound or anything, but I feel strumming is all about letting go and letting you hand to what it WANTS to do. I'll start strumming a pattern, fretting just one chord, I'll get into the groove and my strumming is good. If I allow myself to think about the pattern I'm strumming for a millisecond it all goes in the crapper. The left brain in me needs me think through every down and up stroke which totally screws up my strumming.:p

I completely agree with you...I don't understand why people are so caught up on learning the down up down up ect ect stuff...just listen to the music or feel how it should sound. Getting caught up on some strumming diagram just gives your brain one thing more to worry about. Never forget that at its heart, music comes from inside us not a piece of paper

wolfybau
06-10-2011, 11:04 AM
because its fn to learn new strum patterns and different syncopations and ways to do things that you might not otherwise think of. I realy like ethnic music and learnign about different cultrues, and learning their ways of playing music and doing things is very interesting to me. Im very good at learning by ear and remembering things etc anymore, it relay helps me to have a written guide to brake down the timing when Im learning music. i guess if its good enough for orchestras and drummers , why not oother rythm instruments too.

bornagainjeeper
06-10-2011, 11:20 AM
as a life long musician i do understand the value of written music, but training the ear is how you switch from musical robot to musical artist

PhilUSAFRet
06-10-2011, 12:25 PM
A smooth rythmical strum can be a real advantage when playing with others. Some folks need a metronome to "train their brain" for a while. Some tuners have them built in.

molokinirum
06-10-2011, 01:14 PM
I agree...that is how I strum!! Play the song as you feel it!

Seen
06-23-2011, 10:58 AM
I used to think like that until I get real tired of just using the same old strumming patterns all the time. And then I decided to check out a few videos and WHOA it's a whole new world out there! Obviously you don't have to follow everything to the tee but there are so many ideas out there that you can inspire from. Like http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCLHUQQa-Cc&feature=related for example. It never occurred to me that I could use my left hand to be part of the strum!

PhilUSAFRet
06-23-2011, 12:25 PM
Was doing some "free form" strumming and my son noticed I was "accidentally" doing some tripletts. I am now practicing doing them on purpose. When I first tried to force a triplett, I couldn't do it very well. I have to strum patterns to fit in with my uke meetup group, then I like to do my "own thing" when I am not playing with a group. I have also played a little drums and sometimes I just strum to match a drum beat I might have chosen if I were playing drums. Works for me. Most importantly, have a ball.

808boy
06-23-2011, 03:40 PM
Aloha,
I too just let my musical being do it's thing, as long as the tempo is there. Play from the heart and your hands will do their thing. I played guitar, bass guitar, drums, uke, and sang alot in my life, and I always performed from my heart and it has'nt let me down. Main thing is HAVE FUN!...............................BO............. .............

Manalishi
06-24-2011, 05:42 AM
Feel it don't analyse it! Only way to go!