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spookefoote
06-11-2011, 05:09 AM
Got a new Brunswick Baritone for the school uke orchestra last week and chucked some of those fancy Guadalupe Custom Strings (octave below) on it. Man!!!!!!!!! they sound good. Can't put the thing down. It's going to add a whole new dimension to the orchestra.

mm stan
06-11-2011, 06:15 AM
Aloha Spooky,
Happy Belated Birthday greetings..and congratulations on the new baritone...I love mine too...really nice pickers....Have fun and enjoy...MM Stan

mds725
06-11-2011, 08:28 AM
Congratulations on the new ukulele. Please post some photos if you have a chance. Some of us like to drool over other people's new acquisitions. :)

maikii
06-11-2011, 10:14 AM
Got a new Brunswick Baritone for the school uke orchestra last week and chucked some of those fancy Guadalupe Custom Strings (octave below) on it. Man!!!!!!!!! they sound good. Can't put the thing down. It's going to add a whole new dimension to the orchestra.

What do you mean here by "octave below"? Is this bari tuned an octave below regular bari tuning? If so, those must be some thick strings, almost like the u-Bass!

spookefoote
06-11-2011, 10:24 AM
Standard soprano tuning but an octave below. The G is low.

G C & E are wound, making them relatively thin. Seriously it sounds like a lute! it is something else. Those strings are the canine's sphericals. The advantage is that you don't need to learn different chord shapes which makes it more accessible to any player in the orchestra. Plus the octave below gives an added dimension and warmth to the otherwise high tones of the sopranos and concerts. the Uke itself was about 50 and the strings 8 from ebay. Bargain or what?

maikii
06-11-2011, 01:27 PM
Standard soprano tuning but an octave below. The G is low.

G C & E are wound, making them relatively thin. Seriously it sounds like a lute! it is something else. Those strings are the canine's sphericals. The advantage is that you don't need to learn different chord shapes which makes it more accessible to any player in the orchestra. Plus the octave below gives an added dimension and warmth to the otherwise high tones of the sopranos and concerts. the Uke itself was about 50 and the strings 8 from ebay. Bargain or what?

I don't thinhk anyone has to learn different chord shapes, unless one has some unusual tuning, open or something, No different chord shapes between AECG and EBGD, just different names for those shapes.
I am a guitar player, recently started uke. Of course there their is the adaptation that two strings are missing, using four string shapes instead of 6.

However, I still think of the chord that is G on a guitar, that would also be G on a bari, as G if I play it on an AECG-tuned instrument. However, I know that it actually sounds a fourth higher, as a C chord,. That is important to know, when one plays with others. Also, to find a good key for one's singing voice. (Wind players do that all the time. A C on a tenor or soprano saxophone really sounds like a Bb, whereas on the alto or bark sax that same note sounds like an Eb. Yet the player sof both think of the note as "C". They know the transpositions though.

So, if one knows the chords by the AECG names, and starts playing bari at EBGD, one does not have to learn chord shapes all over again. Think of them the same as before, with the same names, but know that it sounds a fourth lower.

That is interesting though--tuning a bari in AECG, an octave lower than soprano. For that too, I would think that one would need very heavy strings. How common is that tuning?

joeybug
06-11-2011, 01:55 PM
Got a new Brunswick Baritone for the school uke orchestra last week and chucked some of those fancy Guadalupe Custom Strings (octave below) on it. Man!!!!!!!!! they sound good. Can't put the thing down. It's going to add a whole new dimension to the orchestra.

Happy New Uke Day!!!

We need pics and a sound sample!!! All these people getting new Ukes, makes me excited to start saving for my next which'll be a custom!

spookefoote
06-11-2011, 11:16 PM
I don't thinhk anyone has to learn different chord shapes, unless one has some unusual tuning, open or something, No different chord shapes between AECG and EBGD, just different names for those shapes.
I am a guitar player, recently started uke. Of course there their is the adaptation that two strings are missing, using four string shapes instead of 6.

However, I still think of the chord that is G on a guitar, that would also be G on a bari, as G if I play it on an AECG-tuned instrument. However, I know that it actually sounds a fourth higher, as a C chord,. That is important to know, when one plays with others. Also, to find a good key for one's singing voice. (Wind players do that all the time. A C on a tenor or soprano saxophone really sounds like a Bb, whereas on the alto or bark sax that same note sounds like an Eb. Yet the player sof both think of the note as "C". They know the transpositions though.

So, if one knows the chords by the AECG names, and starts playing bari at EBGD, one does not have to learn chord shapes all over again. Think of them the same as before, with the same names, but know that it sounds a fourth lower.

That is interesting though--tuning a bari in AECG, an octave lower than soprano. For that too, I would think that one would need very heavy strings. How common is that tuning?

I think you missed the point that in a school orchestra where pupils have never played a plucked string instrument other thatn a ukulele a baritone tuned this way makes it more accessible to them.

kissing
06-12-2011, 01:21 AM
So they make custom strings for Baritone uke that tunes GCEA an octave lower?

spookefoote
06-12-2011, 02:41 AM
They certainly do me old kisser. It came with DGBE but it didn't sound rich enough for me. I stumbled by them on ebay. They're no where near as massive a guage as one might expect.

spookefoote
06-13-2011, 08:47 AM
I don't know how to do a sound sample. I wish I did, I want to share the love!!!!!!!!